Jorg J Goronzy

Summary

Affiliation: Mayo Clinic
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Selective activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase signaling pathway by stimulatory KIR in the absence of KARAP/DAP12 in CD4+ T cells
    Melissa R Snyder
    Department of Medicine Rheumatology and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Exp Med 197:437-49. 2003
  2. pmc Major histocompatibility complex class I-recognizing receptors are disease risk genes in rheumatoid arthritis
    J H Yen
    Department of Medicine and the Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    J Exp Med 193:1159-67. 2001
  3. pmc Aging, autoimmunity and arthritis: T-cell senescence and contraction of T-cell repertoire diversity - catalysts of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 5:225-34. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Thymic function and peripheral T-cell homeostasis in rheumatoid arthritis
    J J Goronzy
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Trends Immunol 22:251-5. 2001
  5. pmc B cells as a therapeutic target in autoimmune disease
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 5:131-5. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Prognostic markers of radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 50:43-54. 2004
  7. pmc Value of immunological markers in predicting responsiveness to influenza vaccination in elderly individuals
    J J Goronzy
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    J Virol 75:12182-7. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint T-cell-mediated lysis of endothelial cells in acute coronary syndromes
    Takako Nakajima
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Circulation 105:570-5. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Stimulatory killer Ig-like receptors modulate T cell activation through DAP12-dependent and DAP12-independent mechanisms
    Melissa R Snyder
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905
    J Immunol 173:3725-31. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint De novo expression of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and signaling proteins regulates the cytotoxic function of CD4 T cells in acute coronary syndromes
    Takako Nakajima
    Departments of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn 55905, USA
    Circ Res 93:106-13. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications98

  1. pmc Selective activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase signaling pathway by stimulatory KIR in the absence of KARAP/DAP12 in CD4+ T cells
    Melissa R Snyder
    Department of Medicine Rheumatology and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Exp Med 197:437-49. 2003
    ..Our data suggest that CD158j in T cells functions as a costimulatory molecule through the JNK pathway independent of KARAP/DAP12 and DAP10. Costimulation by CD158j may contribute to the autoreactivity of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells in RA...
  2. pmc Major histocompatibility complex class I-recognizing receptors are disease risk genes in rheumatoid arthritis
    J H Yen
    Department of Medicine and the Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    J Exp Med 193:1159-67. 2001
    ..Specifically, KIR2DS2 in conjunction with the appropriate HLA-C ligand may have a role in vascular damage by regulating CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells...
  3. pmc Aging, autoimmunity and arthritis: T-cell senescence and contraction of T-cell repertoire diversity - catalysts of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 5:225-34. 2003
    ..These cells are under the regulatory control of nonconventional costimulatory molecules, display potent effector functions, and appear to be critical in the synovial and extra-articular manifestations of RA...
  4. ncbi request reprint Thymic function and peripheral T-cell homeostasis in rheumatoid arthritis
    J J Goronzy
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Trends Immunol 22:251-5. 2001
    ..Increased risk of autoimmunity, as a consequence of abnormal T-cell population dynamics, could be a common mechanism in chronic inflammatory diseases...
  5. pmc B cells as a therapeutic target in autoimmune disease
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 5:131-5. 2003
    ..Studies exploring which mechanisms are functional in which subset of patients hold the promise of providing new and rational treatment approaches for autoimmune syndromes...
  6. ncbi request reprint Prognostic markers of radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 50:43-54. 2004
    ..To identify prognostic markers that are predictive of progressive erosive disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)...
  7. pmc Value of immunological markers in predicting responsiveness to influenza vaccination in elderly individuals
    J J Goronzy
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    J Virol 75:12182-7. 2001
    ..Frequencies of CD8(+) CD28(null) T cells are useful biological markers of compromised immunocompetence, identifying individuals at risk for insufficient antibody responses...
  8. ncbi request reprint T-cell-mediated lysis of endothelial cells in acute coronary syndromes
    Takako Nakajima
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Circulation 105:570-5. 2002
    ..CD4 T lymphocytes accumulate in unstable plaque. The direct and indirect involvement of these T cells in tissue injury and plaque instability is not understood...
  9. ncbi request reprint Stimulatory killer Ig-like receptors modulate T cell activation through DAP12-dependent and DAP12-independent mechanisms
    Melissa R Snyder
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905
    J Immunol 173:3725-31. 2004
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint De novo expression of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and signaling proteins regulates the cytotoxic function of CD4 T cells in acute coronary syndromes
    Takako Nakajima
    Departments of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn 55905, USA
    Circ Res 93:106-13. 2003
    ..Consequently, these T cells acquire cytolytic capability that can bypass the need for T-cell receptor triggering and, thus, impose a threat to self-tolerance...
  11. pmc Thrombospondin 2 functions as an endogenous regulator of angiogenesis and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis
    Yong Wook Park
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Am J Pathol 165:2087-98. 2004
    ..We propose that TSP2 is an endogenous regulator of angiogenesis and autoimmune inflammation in the synovium and represents a protective mechanism preventing ectopic lympho-organogenesis and persistent inflammation in this tissue site...
  12. ncbi request reprint Tissue trafficking patterns of effector memory CD4+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis
    Xiaoyu Zhang
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 52:3839-49. 2005
    ..We undertook this study to examine the tissue niche for CD4+,CD28- T cells and the signals regulating their survival and tissue homing patterns...
  13. ncbi request reprint Cell-based immunotherapy with suppressor CD8+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis
    Eduardo Davila
    Department of Medicine, Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Immunol 174:7292-301. 2005
    ..We propose that rheumatoid synovitis can be suppressed by cell-based immunotherapy with immunoregulatory CD8(+) T cells...
  14. ncbi request reprint The influence of age on T cell generation and TCR diversity
    Keith Naylor
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Graduate School, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 174:7446-52. 2005
    ..The collapse in CD4 T cell diversity during the seventh and eighth decades indicates substantial T cell loss and implies that therapeutic measures to improve vaccine responses will have to include strategies for T cell replenishment...
  15. pmc TRAIL-expressing T cells induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic plaque
    Kayoko Sato
    Department of Medicine, Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Exp Med 203:239-50. 2006
    ..These data identify that the death pathway is triggered by TRAIL-producing CD4 T cells as a direct mechanism of VSMC apoptosis, a process which may lead to plaque destabilization...
  16. pmc CD8 T cells are required for the formation of ectopic germinal centers in rheumatoid synovitis
    Young Mo Kang
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Exp Med 195:1325-36. 2002
    ..We propose that CD8+ T cells regulate the structural integrity and functional activity of GCs in ectopic lymphoid follicles...
  17. ncbi request reprint Formation of the killer Ig-like receptor repertoire on CD4+CD28null T cells
    Melissa R Snyder
    Department of Medicine Rheumatology and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 168:3839-46. 2002
    ..The computer simulations favored a model in which KIR gene expression is inducible for a limited time during the initial stages of clonal expansion...
  18. pmc Premature telomeric loss in rheumatoid arthritis is genetically determined and involves both myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages
    Stefan O Schonland
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:13471-6. 2003
    ..We propose that HLA-DRB1*04 alleles or genes in linkage disequilibrium regulate stem cell replication and contribute to the accumulation of senescent and autoreactive T cells in rheumatoid arthritis...
  19. pmc Telomerase insufficiency in rheumatoid arthritis
    Hiroshi Fujii
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology and Rheumatology, Emory University School of Medicine, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:4360-5. 2009
    ..Restoring defective telomerase activity emerges as a therapeutic target in resetting immune abnormalities in RA...
  20. ncbi request reprint CD28 loss in senescent CD4+ T cells: reversal by interleukin-12 stimulation
    Kenneth J Warrington
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Blood 101:3543-9. 2003
    ..The re-expressed CD28 was functional and restored the ability of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells to express CD25 and CD40 ligand. Our data suggest that IL-12 may, in part, functionally rescue senescent CD4(+) T cells...
  21. ncbi request reprint Interleukin 12 induces T-cell recruitment into the atherosclerotic plaque
    Xiaoyu Zhang
    Department of Medicine, Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
    Circ Res 98:524-31. 2006
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Homeostatic control of T-cell generation in neonates
    Stefan O Schonland
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Blood 102:1428-34. 2003
    ..Maintaining optimal clonal size instead of filling the space in a lymphopenic host appears to regulate homeostatic T-cell proliferation during fetal development...
  23. pmc Decline in miR-181a expression with age impairs T cell receptor sensitivity by increasing DUSP6 activity
    Guangjin Li
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Med 18:1518-24. 2012
    ..DUSP6 is a potential intervention target for restoring T cell responses in the elderly, which may augment the effectiveness of vaccination...
  24. pmc Signal inhibition by the dual-specific phosphatase 4 impairs T cell-dependent B-cell responses with age
    Mingcan Yu
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:E879-88. 2012
    ..004) was restored. Our data suggest that increased DUSP4 expression in activated T cells in the elderly in part accounts for defective adaptive immune responses...
  25. pmc Dampened ERK signaling in hematopoietic progenitor cells in rheumatoid arthritis
    Ines Colmegna
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University, USA
    Clin Immunol 143:73-82. 2012
    ..Thus, hyporesponsiveness of RA HPC to growth factors results from dampening of the ERK signaling pathways; with a defect localized in the very early steps of the ERK signaling cascade...
  26. ncbi request reprint Synoviocyte-mediated expansion of inflammatory T cells in rheumatoid synovitis is dependent on CD47-thrombospondin 1 interaction
    Abbe N Vallejo
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 171:1732-40. 2003
    ..Because TSP1 is abundantly expressed in the rheumatoid synovium, CD47-TSP1 interaction is proposed to be a key component of an FLS/T cell regulatory circuit that perpetuates the inflammatory process in the rheumatoid joint...
  27. pmc Activation of arterial wall dendritic cells and breakdown of self-tolerance in giant cell arteritis
    Wei Ma-Krupa
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Exp Med 199:173-83. 2004
    ..Activation of adventitial DCs initiates and maintains T cell responses in the artery and breaks tissue tolerance in the perivascular space...
  28. ncbi request reprint Distinct transcriptional control mechanisms of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors in natural killer (NK) and in T cells
    Jing Xu
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:24277-85. 2005
    ..We suggest that the regulated expression of KIRs in T cells profoundly influences peripheral tolerance and antigen-specific immune responses...
  29. pmc Trapping of misdirected dendritic cells in the granulomatous lesions of giant cell arteritis
    Wei Ma Krupa
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:1815-23. 2002
    ....
  30. pmc Reactive nitrogen intermediates in giant cell arteritis: selective nitration of neocapillaries
    Astrid Borkowski
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Am J Pathol 161:115-23. 2002
    ..Heterogeneity of microvessels in NOS-3 regulation may be an additional determinant contributing to this compartmentalization and could explain the preferential targeting of newly generated capillary beds...
  31. ncbi request reprint Immunosenescence, autoimmunity, and rheumatoid arthritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Guggenheim 401, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Exp Gerontol 38:833-41. 2003
    ..We propose that autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis is a consequence of immunodegeneration that is associated with age-inappropriate remodeling of the T-cell pool...
  32. ncbi request reprint The double life of NK receptors: stimulation or co-stimulation?
    Melissa R Snyder
    Department of Immunology, 401 Guggenheim, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Trends Immunol 25:25-32. 2004
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint T cell recognition and killing of vascular smooth muscle cells in acute coronary syndrome
    Sergey Pryshchep
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Circ Res 98:1168-76. 2006
    ..Lowered setting of the T cell activation threshold, attributable to excessive amplification of proximal CD3-mediated signals, may contribute to CD4 T cell-mediated killing of VSMCs and promote plaque instability...
  34. pmc IL-7- and IL-15-mediated TCR sensitization enables T cell responses to self-antigens
    Pratima Deshpande
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 190:1416-23. 2013
    ..We propose that HCs, possibly induced by lymphopenia, decrease the signaling threshold for TCR activation and are thereby partly responsible for autoimmunity in RA...
  35. pmc K-RAS GTPase- and B-RAF kinase-mediated T-cell tolerance defects in rheumatoid arthritis
    Karnail Singh
    Lowance Center for Human Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:E1629-37. 2012
    ..We propose that increased expression of B-RAF and K-RAS lowers T-cell activation thresholds in RA T cells, enabling responses to autoantigens...
  36. doi request reprint Immune aging and autoimmunity
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA, 94305 5166, USA
    Cell Mol Life Sci 69:1615-23. 2012
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Modulation of CD28 expression with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy in rheumatoid arthritis
    Ewa Bryl
    Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 52:2996-3003. 2005
    ..Because reduced expression of CD28 in T cells compromises immunocompetence, we examined whether CD28 expression is reduced in patients with RA in vivo and whether the reduction is related to TNFalpha...
  38. pmc Deficiency of the DNA repair enzyme ATM in rheumatoid arthritis
    Lan Shao
    The Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Exp Med 206:1435-49. 2009
    ..Restoration of DNA repair mechanisms emerges as an important therapeutic target in RA...
  39. pmc BLyS and APRIL in rheumatoid arthritis
    Thorsten M Seyler
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    J Clin Invest 115:3083-92. 2005
    ..We propose that BLyS and APRIL regulate B cell as well as T cell function and have pro- and antiinflammatory activities in RA...
  40. pmc ERK-dependent T cell receptor threshold calibration in rheumatoid arthritis
    Karnail Singh
    Department of Medicine, Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology and Rheumatology, Emory UniversitySchool of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Immunol 183:8258-67. 2009
    ..Treatment with subtherapeutic doses of a MEK-1/2 inhibitor delayed arthritis onset and reduced severity, suggesting that increased ERK phosphorylation predisposes for autoimmunity and can be targeted to prevent disease...
  41. pmc Telomeres and immunological diseases of aging
    Nicolas P Andrews
    Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Gerontology 56:390-403. 2010
    ....
  42. ncbi request reprint Down-regulation of CD28 expression by TNF-alpha
    E Bryl
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 167:3231-8. 2001
    ..These results demonstrate that TNF-alpha directly influences CD28 gene transcription. We propose that the emergence of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells in vivo is facilitated by increased production of TNF-alpha...
  43. ncbi request reprint Molecular basis for the loss of CD28 expression in senescent T cells
    Abbe N Vallejo
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:46940-9. 2002
    ..The present data also provide evidence for INR-regulated transcription that is independent of the known components of the basal transcription complex...
  44. ncbi request reprint B cells as a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases
    Yong Wook Park
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Woodruff Memorial Research Building, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Expert Opin Ther Targets 9:431-45. 2005
    ..As a general rule, clinical effects of B cell-directed therapeutics have often been unanticipated and unpredicted by experimental models, emphasis-ing the need to explore and verify disease principles in the patient...
  45. ncbi request reprint Premature immunosenescence in rheumatoid arthritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    J Rheumatol 29:1141-6. 2002
  46. ncbi request reprint Toll-like receptors in giant cell arteritis
    Wei Ma-Krupa
    Department of Medicine, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Woodruff Memorial Research Building, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Clin Immunol 115:38-46. 2005
    ..These data identify tissue-residing DCs as gatekeepers in vasculitis and support the model that TLR ligands function as instigators of vessel wall inflammation...
  47. pmc Rheumatoid arthritis is an independent risk factor for multi-vessel coronary artery disease: a case control study
    Kenneth J Warrington
    Division of Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 7:R984-91. 2005
    ..Expansion of CD4+CD28null T cells in these patients may contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis...
  48. ncbi request reprint Telomeres, immune aging and autoimmunity
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Room 1003 Woodruff Memorial Research Building, 101 Woodruff Cricle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Exp Gerontol 41:246-51. 2006
    ..Equally interestingly, accelerated T-cell aging combined with telomeric shortening may predispose for autoimmune responses and thereby explain the increased susceptibility for chronic inflammatory diseases in the elderly...
  49. ncbi request reprint T cell activation in rheumatoid synovium is B cell dependent
    S Takemura
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 167:4710-8. 2001
    ..The central role of B cells in synovial inflammation identifies them as excellent targets for immunosuppressive therapy...
  50. ncbi request reprint Treatment of giant cell arteritis using induction therapy with high-dose glucocorticoids: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective clinical trial
    Mehrdad Mazlumzadeh
    Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 54:3310-8. 2006
    ..The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that induction treatment with high-dose pulse intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone permits a shorter course of therapy...
  51. ncbi request reprint Medium- and large-vessel vasculitis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, USA
    N Engl J Med 349:160-9. 2003
  52. ncbi request reprint Stem cell aging and autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory School of Medicine, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Trends Mol Med 10:426-33. 2004
  53. pmc Immune aging and rheumatoid arthritis
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, 269 West Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5166, USA
    Rheum Dis Clin North Am 36:297-310. 2010
    ....
  54. ncbi request reprint T-cell senescence: a culprit of immune abnormalities in chronic inflammation and persistent infection
    Abbe N Vallejo
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Trends Mol Med 10:119-24. 2004
    ..Indeed, studies on the molecular basis for the loss of CD28 are already providing information on methods to functionally rescue senescent T cells...
  55. ncbi request reprint CD4+,CD28- T cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients combine features of the innate and adaptive immune systems
    K J Warrington
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 44:13-20. 2001
    ....
  56. ncbi request reprint Immunopathways in giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Immunology, Guggenheim 401, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 3:46-53. 2004
    ..Immunologically most interesting is polymyalgia rheumatica, in which the systemic component is combined with aborted vasculitis, suggesting a role for artery-specific tolerance mechanisms...
  57. doi request reprint The immunopathology of giant cell arteritis: diagnostic and therapeutic implications
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, and the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Neuroophthalmol 32:259-65. 2012
    ..Expansion of the therapeutic armamentarium for GCA needs to focus on approaches that mitigate the impact of the aging artery and adapt to the needs of the immunosenescent host...
  58. pmc CD8+CD45RA+CCR7+FOXP3+ T cells with immunosuppressive properties: a novel subset of inducible human regulatory T cells
    Masakatsu Suzuki
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 189:2118-30. 2012
    ..Loss of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs in the elderly host may be of relevance in the aging immune system as immunosenescence is associated with a state of chronic smoldering inflammation...
  59. ncbi request reprint Cytokines in giant-cell arteritis
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Medical and Graduate Schools, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Cleve Clin J Med 69:SII91-4. 2002
    ..IFN-gamma appears to be critically involved in modulating the process of intimal hyperplasia, the most destructive consequence of vasculitis, and, as such, emerges as a prime target for novel therapeutic approaches...
  60. pmc TLR-mediated induction of negative regulatory ligands on dendritic cells
    Stefan Gröschel
    Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Room 1003 Woodruff Memorial Research Building, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Mol Med (Berl) 86:443-55. 2008
    ..Conversely, TLR3 ligands may have therapeutic value in silencing pathogenic immune responses...
  61. pmc Occurrence of giant cell arteritis...suddenly
    Brian R Younge
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 105:141-4; discussion 144-5. 2007
    ..To define the kinetics and mechanisms of frank arteritis onset in patients with giant cell arteritis...
  62. ncbi request reprint Biology of T lymphocytes
    Abbe N Vallejo
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Guggenheim 401, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Rheum Dis Clin North Am 30:135-57. 2004
    ..How we translate the cellular and molecular details of this regulation into innovation and development of therapies for disease management remains a fundamental, but exciting, challenge...
  63. ncbi request reprint Rheumatoid arthritis
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Department of Medicine, Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Immunol Rev 204:55-73. 2005
    ....
  64. pmc DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit mediates T-cell loss in rheumatoid arthritis
    Lan Shao
    Department of Medicine, Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    EMBO Mol Med 2:415-27. 2010
    ..Therapeutic blockade of the DNA-PK-dependent cell-death machinery may rejuvenate the immune system in RA...
  65. pmc HIV and aging: state of knowledge and areas of critical need for research. A report to the NIH Office of AIDS Research by the HIV and Aging Working Group
    Kevin P High
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Infectious Diseases, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1042, USA
    J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 60:S1-18. 2012
    ....
  66. doi request reprint Mechanisms of immunosenescence: lessons from models of accelerated immune aging
    Sabine Le Saux
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1247:69-82. 2012
    ..Studies of accelerated immune aging in autoimmune diseases have identified an unexpected link to chronic DNA damage responses that are known to be important in aging, but so far had not been implicated in immune aging...
  67. pmc Developments in the scientific understanding of rheumatoid arthritis
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Lowance Center for Human Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 11:249. 2009
    ..Targeting mediators involved in this process has greatly improved the management of this chronic inflammatory syndrome...
  68. ncbi request reprint T cell development and receptor diversity during aging
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Curr Opin Immunol 17:468-75. 2005
    ..Elucidation of the underlying mechanisms will allow for extending this turning point to later in life; ultimately, interventions have to aim at restoring thymic function and complementary modes of T cell reconstitution...
  69. ncbi request reprint Functional disruption of the CD28 gene transcriptional initiator in senescent T cells
    A N Vallejo
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    J Biol Chem 276:2565-70. 2001
    ..Rather, initiators can have a direct role in regulating the expression of specific genes. The gain or loss of initiator activity can be an important determinant of cell phenotypes...
  70. ncbi request reprint T-cell immunity in acute coronary syndromes
    C M Weyand
    Division of Rheumatology and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn 55905, USA
    Mayo Clin Proc 76:1011-20. 2001
    ..Natural killer T cells have proinflammatory properties and the capability of directly contributing to vascular injury...
  71. ncbi request reprint Lymphoid neogenesis in rheumatoid synovitis
    S Takemura
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 167:1072-80. 2001
    ....
  72. ncbi request reprint Central role of thrombospondin-1 in the activation and clonal expansion of inflammatory T cells
    A N Vallejo
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 164:2947-54. 2000
    ....
  73. ncbi request reprint The role of T cells in rheumatoid arthritis
    C M Weyand
    Division of Rheumatology, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, USA
    Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) 48:429-35. 2000
    ..Understanding the mechanisms underlying the loss of T cell diversity and the emergence of pro-inflammatory CD4(+)CD28null T cell clonotypes may have implications for other autoimmune syndromes...
  74. ncbi request reprint Pathogenic principles in giant cell arteritis
    C M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 401 Guggenheim Building, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Int J Cardiol 75:S9-S15; discussion S17-9. 2000
    ..Heterogeneity in the immune insult and the resulting arterial response patterns correlate with variations in clinical disease...
  75. pmc Cell-cell interactions in synovitis. Interactions between T cells and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis
    C M Weyand
    Division of Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Arthritis Res 2:457-63. 2000
    ..B cells have a critical role in lymphoid organogenesis. Their contribution to synovial inflammation extends beyond antibody secretion and includes the activation and regulation of effector T cells...
  76. pmc Association of MHC and rheumatoid arthritis. HLA polymorphisms in phenotypic variants of rheumatoid arthritis
    C M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Arthritis Res 2:212-6. 2000
    ....
  77. ncbi request reprint Clonality and longevity of CD4+CD28null T cells are associated with defects in apoptotic pathways
    A N Vallejo
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 165:6301-7. 2000
    ....
  78. ncbi request reprint HLA polymorphisms and T cells in rheumatoid arthritis
    C M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Int Rev Immunol 18:37-59. 1999
    ....
  79. ncbi request reprint Modulation of CD28 expression: distinct regulatory pathways during activation and replicative senescence
    A N Vallejo
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Immunol 162:6572-9. 1999
    ..In vivo expanded CD4+CD28null and CD8+CD28null T cells uniformly lack alpha- and beta-bound complexes, resembling the pattern seen in chronically activated cells and not of senescent cells...
  80. ncbi request reprint The power of the third dimension: tissue architecture and autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis
    C M Weyand
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Curr Opin Rheumatol 15:259-66. 2003
    ..Recent data support the concept that the tissue organization in the rheumatoid joint fosters a breakdown in self-tolerance by promoting a phase transition from self-limited immune responses to self-perpetuating autoimmune responses...
  81. ncbi request reprint Corticosteroid requirements in polymyalgia rheumatica
    C M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minn 55905, USA
    Arch Intern Med 159:577-84. 1999
    ..Guidelines for the optimal use of corticosteroids that maximize relief of symptoms but minimize adverse effects of the therapy are needed...
  82. ncbi request reprint Functional properties of CD4+ CD28- T cells in the aging immune system
    C M Weyand
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Mech Ageing Dev 102:131-47. 1998
    ..We propose that the emergence of CD28-deficient CD4 T cells in the elderly can partially explain age-specific aberrations in immune responsiveness...
  83. ncbi request reprint How aggressive should initial therapy for rheumatoid arthritis be? Factors associated with response to 'non-aggressive' DMARD treatment and perspective from a 2-yr open label trial
    E L Matteson
    Division of Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    Rheumatology (Oxford) 43:619-25. 2004
    ..To determine what baseline factors might be associated with response to an initial mild treatment regimen in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)...
  84. pmc Giant cell arteritis: immune and vascular aging as disease risk factors
    Shalini V Mohan
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5166, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 13:231. 2011
    ..Thus, the aging process impacts the two major biologic systems that liaise to promote giant cell arteritis; the immune system and the vessel wall niche...
  85. pmc IFN-γ and IL-17: the two faces of T-cell pathology in giant cell arteritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5166, USA
    Curr Opin Rheumatol 23:43-9. 2011
    ..Recent data demonstrate that at least two separate lineages of CD4 T cells participate in vascular inflammation, providing an important clue that multiple disease instigators may initiate pathogenic immunity...
  86. pmc Pathomechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis--time for a string theory?
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    J Clin Invest 116:869-71. 2006
    ..We may want to seek guidance from our colleagues in physics and mathematics who have successfully integrated their knowledge of elementary particles and the complexity of their interacting forces by formulating the string theory...
  87. ncbi request reprint T-cell-targeted therapies in rheumatoid arthritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 2:201-10. 2006
    ....
  88. pmc Regulation of T cell receptor signaling by activation-induced zinc influx
    Mingcan Yu
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Exp Med 208:775-85. 2011
    ..By calibrating TCR activation thresholds, increased extracellular zinc bioavailability facilitated the induction of T cell proliferative responses to suboptimal stimuli...
  89. pmc Homozygosity for the HLA-DRB1 allele selects for extraarticular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis
    C M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905
    J Clin Invest 89:2033-9. 1992
    ..The finding of a codominant function of HLA-DRB1 alleles suggests that the biological function of HLA-DR molecules in thymic selection might be important in the pathogenesis of RA...
  90. pmc The janus head of T cell aging - autoimmunity and immunodeficiency
    Jorg J Goronzy
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Department of Medicine, Palo Alto Veteran Administration Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    Front Immunol 4:131. 2013
    ..In this review, we will discuss age-associated deviations in the immune repertoire and the regulation of signaling pathways that may shed light on this conundrum...
  91. ncbi request reprint Ectopic germinal center formation in rheumatoid synovitis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 987:140-9. 2003
    ..Follicle-sustaining CD8 T cells were located at the edge of or within the mantle zone. Cell-cell communication in the mantle zone, including CD8 T cells, appears to be critical for ectopic GC formation in rheumatoid synovitis...
  92. ncbi request reprint Pathogenic mechanisms in giant cell arteritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Medical and Graduate Schools, Rochester, MN, USA
    Cleve Clin J Med 69:SII28-32. 2002
    ....
  93. ncbi request reprint Giant-cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Ann Intern Med 139:505-15. 2003
    ..In general, the clinical outcome of giant-cell arteritis is excellent, and efforts must now concentrate on tailoring therapies to the needs of the individual patient...
  94. ncbi request reprint Synergistic proinflammatory effects of the antiviral cytokine interferon-alpha and Toll-like receptor 4 ligands in the atherosclerotic plaque
    Alexander Niessner
    Kathleen B and Mason I Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Circulation 116:2043-52. 2007
    ..In rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques, plasmacytoid dendritic cells produce IFN-alpha. In the present study we explored the contribution of IFN-alpha to inflammation and tissue injury in the plaque microenvironment...
  95. ncbi request reprint Therapeutic effects of acetylsalicylic acid in giant cell arteritis
    Cornelia M Weyand
    Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 46:457-66. 2002
    ..The current study explored whether acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) had cytokine-repressing activity in GCA and could function as a steroid-sparing agent...
  96. ncbi request reprint Immune-mediated mechanisms in atherosclerosis: prevention and treatment of clinical manifestations
    A Niessner
    Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Curr Pharm Des 13:3701-10. 2007
    ..These therapeutic approaches can be classified as (1) immunomodulatory effects of existing therapies, (2) therapies targeting inflammatory triggers, and (3) agents inhibiting specific immune mechanisms...
  97. ncbi request reprint Eosinophil-active cytokine from mononuclear cells cultured with L-tryptophan products: an unexpected consequence of endotoxin contamination
    H Kita
    Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 95:1261-7. 1995
    ..Endotoxin contamination must be considered as a possible cause of eosinophil-active cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells...
  98. ncbi request reprint Molecular fingerprint of interferon-gamma signaling in unstable angina
    G Liuzzo
    Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Circulation 103:1509-14. 2001
    ..IFN-gamma may derive from stimulated T lymphocytes, which implicates specific immune responses in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes...