Akira Yoshii

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A Myosin Va mutant mouse with disruptions in glutamate synaptic development and mature plasticity in visual cortex
    Akira Yoshii
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Neurosci 33:8472-82. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint BDNF induces transport of PSD-95 to dendrites through PI3K-AKT signaling after NMDA receptor activation
    Akira Yoshii
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 4307, USA
    Nat Neurosci 10:702-11. 2007
  3. pmc TrkB and protein kinase Mζ regulate synaptic localization of PSD-95 in developing cortex
    Akira Yoshii
    Departmens of Brain and Cognitive Science, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Neurosci 31:11894-904. 2011
  4. pmc Eye opening induces a rapid dendritic localization of PSD-95 in central visual neurons
    Akira Yoshii
    Department of Biology, Center for Learning and Memory, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 4307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1334-9. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Receptor compartmentalization and trafficking at glutamate synapses: a developmental proposal
    Brigitte van Zundert
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Trends Neurosci 27:428-37. 2004
  6. pmc Postsynaptic BDNF-TrkB signaling in synapse maturation, plasticity, and disease
    Akira Yoshii
    McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Dev Neurobiol 70:304-22. 2010
  7. pmc Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in the developing mammalian brain
    Eric A Miska
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology and McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Genome Biol 5:R68. 2004
  8. pmc Developmental loss of miniature N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor currents in NR2A knockout mice
    Matthew Townsend
    Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1340-5. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Abnormal cortical development shown by 3D MRI in Prader-Willi syndrome
    Akira Yoshii
    Pediatric Neurology Unit, Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroradiology Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02114 2696, USA
    Neurology 59:644-5. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc A Myosin Va mutant mouse with disruptions in glutamate synaptic development and mature plasticity in visual cortex
    Akira Yoshii
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Neurosci 33:8472-82. 2013
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint BDNF induces transport of PSD-95 to dendrites through PI3K-AKT signaling after NMDA receptor activation
    Akira Yoshii
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 4307, USA
    Nat Neurosci 10:702-11. 2007
    ....
  3. pmc TrkB and protein kinase Mζ regulate synaptic localization of PSD-95 in developing cortex
    Akira Yoshii
    Departmens of Brain and Cognitive Science, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Neurosci 31:11894-904. 2011
    ..These results also indicate that palmitoylation can be regulated by a trophic factor. Our findings have implications for neurodevelopmental disorders as well as aging brains...
  4. pmc Eye opening induces a rapid dendritic localization of PSD-95 in central visual neurons
    Akira Yoshii
    Department of Biology, Center for Learning and Memory, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 4307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1334-9. 2003
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Receptor compartmentalization and trafficking at glutamate synapses: a developmental proposal
    Brigitte van Zundert
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Trends Neurosci 27:428-37. 2004
    ....
  6. pmc Postsynaptic BDNF-TrkB signaling in synapse maturation, plasticity, and disease
    Akira Yoshii
    McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Dev Neurobiol 70:304-22. 2010
    ....
  7. pmc Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in the developing mammalian brain
    Eric A Miska
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology and McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Genome Biol 5:R68. 2004
    ..In invertebrates microRNAs have been implicated as regulators of developmental timing, neuronal differentiation, cell proliferation, programmed cell death and fat metabolism. Little is known about the roles of microRNAs in mammals...
  8. pmc Developmental loss of miniature N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor currents in NR2A knockout mice
    Matthew Townsend
    Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1340-5. 2003
    ..Neonatal receptors become restricted to perisynpatic or extrasynaptic sites, where they participate primarily in evoked currents...
  9. ncbi request reprint Abnormal cortical development shown by 3D MRI in Prader-Willi syndrome
    Akira Yoshii
    Pediatric Neurology Unit, Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroradiology Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02114 2696, USA
    Neurology 59:644-5. 2002