H Warren

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts General Hospital
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bacterial peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein is released into the bloodstream in gram-negative sepsis and causes inflammation and death in mice
    Judith Hellman
    Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:14274-80. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Protective efficacy of CAP18106-138-immunoglobulin G in sepsis
    H Shaw Warren
    Department of Pediatrics and Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Infect Dis 188:1382-93. 2003
  3. pmc Resilience to bacterial infection: difference between species could be due to proteins in serum
    H Shaw Warren
    Infectious Disease Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
    J Infect Dis 201:223-32. 2010
  4. pmc A genomic score prognostic of outcome in trauma patients
    H Shaw Warren
    Infectious Disease Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, United States of America
    Mol Med 15:220-7. 2009
  5. pmc Passive immunization to outer membrane proteins MLP and PAL does not protect mice from sepsis
    Catherine H Valentine
    Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Mol Med 12:252-8. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Bacterial peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein: a naturally occurring toll-like receptor 2 agonist that is shed into serum and has synergy with lipopolysaccharide
    Michael D Liang
    Department of Pathology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Infect Dis 191:939-48. 2005
  7. pmc Hemopexin down-regulates LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines from macrophages
    Xueya Liang
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 86:229-35. 2009
  8. pmc Assessing statistical significance in microarray experiments using the distance between microarrays
    Douglas Hayden
    Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e5838. 2009
  9. pmc Synergistic inflammation is induced by blood degradation products with microbial Toll-like receptor agonists and is blocked by hemopexin
    Tian Lin
    Infectious Disease Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    J Infect Dis 202:624-32. 2010
  10. pmc Clinical microfluidics for neutrophil genomics and proteomics
    Kenneth T Kotz
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 16:1042-7. 2010

Research Grants

  1. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2001
  2. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2007
  4. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2006
  5. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2006
  6. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2005
  7. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2003
  8. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2002
  9. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. ncbi request reprint Bacterial peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein is released into the bloodstream in gram-negative sepsis and causes inflammation and death in mice
    Judith Hellman
    Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:14274-80. 2002
    ..The studies suggest that PAL may be an important bacterial mediator of Gram-negative sepsis...
  2. ncbi request reprint Protective efficacy of CAP18106-138-immunoglobulin G in sepsis
    H Shaw Warren
    Department of Pediatrics and Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Infect Dis 188:1382-93. 2003
    ..06), suggesting that direct detoxification of LPS was not the only mechanism of protection. Chemical or genetic coupling of antimicrobial peptides to IgG may be a means of using these peptides to treat infections...
  3. pmc Resilience to bacterial infection: difference between species could be due to proteins in serum
    H Shaw Warren
    Infectious Disease Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
    J Infect Dis 201:223-32. 2010
    ..The involvement of circulating proteins as key molecules raises hope that the process might be manipulated to create better animal models and potentially new drug targets...
  4. pmc A genomic score prognostic of outcome in trauma patients
    H Shaw Warren
    Infectious Disease Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, United States of America
    Mol Med 15:220-7. 2009
    ..Assessment of genome-wide gene expression provides useful clinical information that is different from that provided by currently utilized anatomic or physiologic scores...
  5. pmc Passive immunization to outer membrane proteins MLP and PAL does not protect mice from sepsis
    Catherine H Valentine
    Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Mol Med 12:252-8. 2006
    ..These studies suggest that a different mechanism of protection is involved...
  6. ncbi request reprint Bacterial peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein: a naturally occurring toll-like receptor 2 agonist that is shed into serum and has synergy with lipopolysaccharide
    Michael D Liang
    Department of Pathology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Infect Dis 191:939-48. 2005
    ..These data suggest that PAL may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis and imply that physiologically relevant PAL and LPS are shed into serum and act in concert to initiate inflammation in sepsis...
  7. pmc Hemopexin down-regulates LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines from macrophages
    Xueya Liang
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 86:229-35. 2009
    ..Our data suggest that Hx, which is an acute-phase protein that increases during inflammation, limits TLR4 and TLR2 agonist-induced macrophage cytokine production directly through a mechanism distinct from HO-1...
  8. pmc Assessing statistical significance in microarray experiments using the distance between microarrays
    Douglas Hayden
    Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e5838. 2009
    ..An R software package, permtest, implementing the method is freely available from the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://cran.r-project.org...
  9. pmc Synergistic inflammation is induced by blood degradation products with microbial Toll-like receptor agonists and is blocked by hemopexin
    Tian Lin
    Infectious Disease Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    J Infect Dis 202:624-32. 2010
    ....
  10. pmc Clinical microfluidics for neutrophil genomics and proteomics
    Kenneth T Kotz
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 16:1042-7. 2010
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Murein lipoprotein, peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, and outer membrane protein A are present in purified rough and smooth lipopolysaccharides
    Judith Hellman
    Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Infect Dis 188:286-9. 2003
    ..The studies indicate that PAL and MLP are common contaminants of purified LPS and raise the possibility that these contaminants may influence results of studies performed using purified LPS...
  12. pmc Microfluidic leukocyte isolation for gene expression analysis in critically ill hospitalized patients
    Aman Russom
    Surgical Services and Center for Engineering in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Shriners Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, USA
    Clin Chem 54:891-900. 2008
    ..Here, we report the clinical validation of a novel microfluidic leukocyte nucleic acid isolation technique for gene expression analysis from critically ill, hospitalized patients that can be readily used on small volumes of blood...
  13. ncbi request reprint Toll-like receptors
    H Shaw Warren
    Infectious Disease Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Crit Care Med 33:S457-9. 2005
  14. pmc Identification of specific targets for the gut mucosal defense factor intestinal alkaline phosphatase
    Kathryn T Chen
    Dept of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 299:G467-75. 2010
    ..IAP likely targets these bacterially derived molecules in its role as a gut mucosal defense factor...
  15. ncbi request reprint Risks and benefits of activated protein C treatment for severe sepsis
    H Shaw Warren
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    N Engl J Med 347:1027-30. 2002
  16. ncbi request reprint MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent pathways in synergy, priming, and tolerance between TLR agonists
    Aranya Bagchi
    Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    J Immunol 178:1164-71. 2007
    ..Thus, under the conditions studied here, simultaneous and sequential activation of both the D and I pathways causes synergy and priming, respectively, and tolerance is induced by agonists that act through the same pathway...
  17. ncbi request reprint Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 38-2003. A 12-year-old girl with fever and coma
    H Shaw Warren
    Pediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Pediatric Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA
    N Engl J Med 349:2341-9. 2003
  18. pmc Structural basis for the proinflammatory cytokine activity of high mobility group box 1
    Jianhua Li
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, North Shore Long Island Jewish Research Institute, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA
    Mol Med 9:37-45. 2003
    ..These results indicate that a proinflammatory domain of HMGB1 maps to the highly conserved DNA-binding B box, making this primary sequence a suitable target in the design of therapeutics...
  19. ncbi request reprint Phase I study of detoxified Escherichia coli J5 lipopolysaccharide (J5dLPS)/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP) complex vaccine in human subjects
    Alan S Cross
    Department of Medicine, Center for Vaccine Development, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 685 W Baltimore Street, HSF 480, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Vaccine 21:4576-87. 2003
    ..We conclude that this J5dLPS/OMP vaccine was safe and well-tolerated with transient, local pain at the injection site. Vaccine formulations with different adjuvants are currently under investigation...
  20. ncbi request reprint Human genetics: an inflammatory issue
    Kevin J Tracey
    Nature 429:35-7. 2004
  21. pmc Reversing established sepsis with antagonists of endogenous high-mobility group box 1
    Huan Yang
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, North Shore Long Island Jewish Research Institute, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:296-301. 2004
    ..These observations demonstrate that specific inhibition of endogenous HMGB1 therapeutically reverses lethality of established sepsis indicating that HMGB1 inhibitors can be administered in a clinically relevant time frame...
  22. pmc Acute inflammatory response to endotoxin in mice and humans
    Shannon Copeland
    Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, M2210 Medical Sciences Bldg I, 1301 Catherine Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 0602, USA
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 12:60-7. 2005
    ..These studies demonstrate that although differences exist and a higher endotoxin challenge is necessary in mice, there are several similarities in the inflammatory response to endotoxin in mice and humans...

Research Grants11

  1. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Therefore, a successful outcome of the project would provide a direct and immediate approach to developing anti-OMP antibodies for human use for the treatment of sepsis. ..
  2. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The experiments are designed to evaluate the importance that physiologically relevant forms of MLP and PAL play in the pathophysiology of sepsis during infection. ..
  4. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  5. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The experiments are designed to evaluate the importance that physiologically relevant forms of MLP and PAL play in the pathophysiology of sepsis during infection. ..
  6. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..abstract_text> ..
  7. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Therefore, a successful outcome of the project would provide a direct and immediate approach to developing anti-OMP antibodies for human use for the treatment of sepsis. ..
  8. BACTERIAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN GRAM-NEGATIVE SEPSIS
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Therefore, a successful outcome of the project would provide a direct and immediate approach to developing anti-OMP antibodies for human use for the treatment of sepsis. ..
  9. Mouse model for sepsis
    H Warren; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..