Rebecca R Saxe

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Why and how to study Theory of Mind with fMRI
    Rebecca Saxe
    Harvard Society of Fellows, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Brain Res 1079:57-65. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint People thinking about thinking people. The role of the temporo-parietal junction in "theory of mind"
    R Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NE20 464, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 19:1835-42. 2003
  3. doi request reprint Reading minds versus following rules: dissociating theory of mind and executive control in the brain
    Rebecca Saxe
    MIT, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Soc Neurosci 1:284-98. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Knowing who dunnit: Infants identify the causal agent in an unseen causal interaction
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Dev Psychol 43:149-58. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint It's the thought that counts: specific brain regions for one component of theory of mind
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:692-9. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint The perception of causality in infancy
    Rebecca Saxe
    Psychology Department, Harvard University, United States
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 123:144-65. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Divide and conquer: a defense of functional localizers
    Rebecca Saxe
    Harvard Society of Fellows, USA
    Neuroimage 30:1088-96; discussion 1097-9. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Uniquely human social cognition
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 46 4019, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge MA, 02138, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:235-9. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Five-month-old infants know humans are solid, like inanimate objects
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, NE20 464, 77 Massachussetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 02139, USA
    Cognition 101:B1-8. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Secret agents: inferences about hidden causes by 10- and 12-month-old infants
    R Saxe
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Psychol Sci 16:995-1001. 2005

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. ncbi request reprint Why and how to study Theory of Mind with fMRI
    Rebecca Saxe
    Harvard Society of Fellows, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Brain Res 1079:57-65. 2006
    ..The current review describes responses to three such challenges: deriving hypotheses from developmental psychology, using verbal narratives as stimuli, and analysing the results in functionally defined regions of interest...
  2. ncbi request reprint People thinking about thinking people. The role of the temporo-parietal junction in "theory of mind"
    R Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NE20 464, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 19:1835-42. 2003
    ..Thus, the role of the TPJ-M in understanding other people appears to be specific to reasoning about the content of mental states...
  3. doi request reprint Reading minds versus following rules: dissociating theory of mind and executive control in the brain
    Rebecca Saxe
    MIT, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Soc Neurosci 1:284-98. 2006
    ..g., the right temporo-parietal junction) were implicated only in the belief attribution tasks. These results suggest that both domain-general and domain-specific cognitive resources are involved in adult ToM...
  4. ncbi request reprint Knowing who dunnit: Infants identify the causal agent in an unseen causal interaction
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Dev Psychol 43:149-58. 2007
    ..These data suggest that preverbal infants expect a causal agent as the source of motion of an inert object...
  5. ncbi request reprint It's the thought that counts: specific brain regions for one component of theory of mind
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:692-9. 2006
    ..These data support the hypothesis that the early- and late-developing components of theory of mind rely on separate psychological and neural mechanisms, and that these mechanisms remain distinct into adulthood...
  6. ncbi request reprint The perception of causality in infancy
    Rebecca Saxe
    Psychology Department, Harvard University, United States
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 123:144-65. 2006
    ..However, there is as of yet no good evidence that these representations are innate. Furthermore, there is considerable evidence that these representations are not the sole source of the human capacity for causal representation...
  7. ncbi request reprint Divide and conquer: a defense of functional localizers
    Rebecca Saxe
    Harvard Society of Fellows, USA
    Neuroimage 30:1088-96; discussion 1097-9. 2006
    ..Friston, K., Rotshtein, P., Geng, J., Sterzer, P., Henson, R., in press. A critique of functional localizers. NeuroImage)...
  8. ncbi request reprint Uniquely human social cognition
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 46 4019, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge MA, 02138, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:235-9. 2006
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Five-month-old infants know humans are solid, like inanimate objects
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, NE20 464, 77 Massachussetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 02139, USA
    Cognition 101:B1-8. 2006
    ..In the current study, we report that infants nevertheless do apply some of the same principles to both humans and objects, where appropriate. Five-month-old infants expect humans, like all material objects, to be solid...
  10. ncbi request reprint Secret agents: inferences about hidden causes by 10- and 12-month-old infants
    R Saxe
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Psychol Sci 16:995-1001. 2005
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Understanding other minds: linking developmental psychology and functional neuroimaging
    R Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 55:87-124. 2004
    ..The clear neural distinction between these processes is evidence that belief attribution is not dependent on either inhibitory control or syntax, but is subserved by a specialized neural system for theory of mind...
  12. doi request reprint Brain regions for perceiving and reasoning about other people in school-aged children
    Rebecca R Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, MIT 46 4019, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Child Dev 80:1197-209. 2009
    ..The right temporo-parietal junction was recruited equally for mental and physical facts about people in younger children, but only for mental facts in older children...
  13. ncbi request reprint A region of right posterior superior temporal sulcus responds to observed intentional actions
    R Saxe
    BCS, MIT, 3 Cambridge Center, 77 Massachussetts Avenue NE20 464 Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
    Neuropsychologia 42:1435-46. 2004
    ..From this and other aspects of the region's response, we hypothesize that this region is involved in the representation of observed intentional actions...
  14. pmc Overlapping and non-overlapping brain regions for theory of mind and self reflection in individual subjects
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 1:229-34. 2006
    ..Six possible models of the relationship between theory of mind, self-reflection and autobiographical memory, all consistent with both neurobiological and developmental evidence to date, are discussed...
  15. ncbi request reprint Against simulation: the argument from error
    Rebecca Saxe
    Psychology Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 9:174-9. 2005
    ..In particular, the errors that adults and children make when reasoning about other minds are not consistent with the 'resonance' versions of Simulation Theory...
  16. ncbi request reprint My body or yours? The effect of visual perspective on cortical body representations
    Rebecca Saxe
    Psychology Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cereb Cortex 16:178-82. 2006
    ..These results help to illuminate the integration of visual and tactile information by which the brain identifies seen body parts as belonging to the self or to another person...
  17. ncbi request reprint Making sense of another mind: the role of the right temporo-parietal junction
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, MIT, NE20 443, 77 Massachussetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuropsychologia 43:1391-9. 2005
    ..The implications of these results for an alternative theory of reasoning about other minds--Simulation Theory--are discussed...
  18. doi request reprint The neural basis of belief encoding and integration in moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 40:1912-20. 2008
    ..g., the outcome) for moral judgment...
  19. pmc Anatomical connectivity patterns predict face selectivity in the fusiform gyrus
    Zeynep M Saygin
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Neurosci 15:321-7. 2012
    ..Additionally, we identified cortical regions whose connectivity was highly influential in predicting face selectivity within the fusiform, suggesting a possible mechanistic architecture underlying face processing in humans...
  20. pmc The neural basis of the interaction between theory of mind and moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8235-40. 2007
    ..The results not only suggest a general role for belief attribution during moral judgment, but also add detail to our understanding of the interaction between these processes at both the neural and behavioral levels...
  21. pmc Growing up blind does not change the neural bases of Theory of Mind
    Marina Bedny
    Berenson Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, KS 158, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:11312-7. 2009
    ..We conclude that the development of neural mechanisms for ToM depends on innate factors and on experiences represented at an abstract level, amodally...
  22. pmc Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: a new tool for social cognitive neuroscience
    Elizabeth Redcay
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 50:1639-47. 2010
    ..This method of allowing online, contingent social interactions in the scanner could open up new avenues of research in social cognitive neuroscience, both in typical and atypical populations...
  23. doi request reprint Attitudes towards the outgroup are predicted by activity in the precuneus in Arabs and Israelis
    Emile G Bruneau
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 52:1704-11. 2010
    ....
  24. doi request reprint What gets the attention of the temporo-parietal junction? An fMRI investigation of attention and theory of mind
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 43 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:2658-64. 2010
    ..This pattern provides evidence for the ToM hypothesis: the response in these functional regions is selective for mental state content, whether that content is unexpected or expected...
  25. pmc Disruption of the right temporoparietal junction with transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces the role of beliefs in moral judgments
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:6753-8. 2010
    ..Thus, interfering with activity in the RTPJ disrupts the capacity to use mental states in moral judgment, especially in the case of attempted harms...
  26. doi request reprint Associations and dissociations between default and self-reference networks in the human brain
    Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, and Poitras Center for Affective Disorders Research, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 55:225-32. 2011
    ..These findings indicate that there are both associations (shared components) and dissociations between the neural systems underlying explicit self-reference and the default mode of brain function...
  27. doi request reprint Action understanding as inverse planning
    Chris L Baker
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cognition 113:329-49. 2009
    ....
  28. pmc Impaired theory of mind for moral judgment in high-functioning autism
    Joseph M Moran
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:2688-92. 2011
    ..These findings reveal impairments in integrating mental state information (e.g., beliefs, intentions) for moral judgment...
  29. doi request reprint Innocent intentions: a correlation between forgiveness for accidental harm and neural activity
    Liane Young
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuropsychologia 47:2065-72. 2009
    ..This brain region, the right temporo-parietal junction, has been previously implicated in reasoning about other people's thoughts, beliefs, and intentions in moral and non-moral contexts...
  30. pmc Language processing in the occipital cortex of congenitally blind adults
    Marina Bedny
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4429-34. 2011
    ..Innate microcircuit properties are not necessary for a brain region to become involved in language processing...
  31. doi request reprint An FMRI investigation of spontaneous mental state inference for moral judgment
    Liane Young
    Harvard University, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 21:1396-405. 2009
    ..Together, the results illuminate two aspects of theory of mind in moral judgment: (1) spontaneous belief inference and (2) stimulus-driven belief integration...
  32. pmc Sensitive period for a multimodal response in human visual motion area MT/MST
    Marina Bedny
    Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 46 4021, 43 Vassar Street, Room 46 4021, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Curr Biol 20:1900-6. 2010
    ..During typical development, early visual experience either maintains or creates a vision-dominated response. Once established, this response profile is not altered by long-standing blindness...
  33. doi request reprint Differential selectivity for dynamic versus static information in face-selective cortical regions
    David Pitcher
    McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 56:2356-63. 2011
    ....
  34. doi request reprint For love or money: a common neural currency for social and monetary reward
    Rebecca Saxe
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuron 58:164-5. 2008
    ..and Zink et al.) report that activity in specific regions of the brain, especially the striatum, reflects a common signal of reward in both the economic (e.g., money) and social (e.g., praise and status) domains...
  35. ncbi request reprint Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides new constraints on theories of the psychological refractory period
    Yuhong Jiang
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:390-6. 2004
    ..These data suggest that passive queuing, rather than active monitoring, occurs during the PRP...
  36. pmc The influence of prior record on moral judgment
    Dorit Kliemann
    Department of Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, Center for Cognitive Sciences, Hochschulring 18, Bremen, Germany
    Neuropsychologia 46:2949-57. 2008
    ..The magnitude of RTPJ activation was correlated with individual subjects' behavioural responses to unfair play in the game. These results thus provide insight for both legal theory and moral psychology...
  37. ncbi request reprint Visual orientation in a mirror world tilted 90 degrees
    Ian P Howard
    Center for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Perception 34:7-15. 2005
    ..In experiment 2 we found that a polarised scene was more likely to produce a visual-righting illusion when it was arranged as a view through a window rather than as a picture inside a room...
  38. pmc Concepts are more than percepts: the case of action verbs
    Marina Bedny
    Berenson Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA
    J Neurosci 28:11347-53. 2008
    ..We conclude that concepts are abstracted away from sensory-motor experience and organized according to conceptual properties...