E Mylonakis

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts General Hospital
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc The temperature-sensitive role of Cryptococcus neoformans ROM2 in cell morphogenesis
    Beth Burgwyn Fuchs
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e368. 2007
  2. pmc Identification of antifungal compounds active against Candida albicans using an improved high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans assay
    Ikechukwu Okoli
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e7025. 2009
  3. pmc Antifungal activity of microbial secondary metabolites
    Jeffrey J Coleman
    Harvard Medical School, Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e25321. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint Update on the epidemiology and management of cryptococcal meningitis
    Athanasios Desalermos
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Infectious Disease Division, Department of Medicine, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA 1 617 726 3812 1 617 724 7416
    Expert Opin Pharmacother 13:783-9. 2012
  5. pmc Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates
    Juliana C Junqueira
    Department of Biosciences and Oral Diagnosis, Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Eng, Francisco José Longo, Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil
    BMC Microbiol 11:247. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint The art of serendipity: killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by human pathogens as a model of bacterial and fungal pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 55 Fruit Street, Gray 5, GRJ 504, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 1:167-73. 2003
  7. pmc Galleria mellonella as a model system to study Cryptococcus neoformans pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit St, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 73:3842-50. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Listeriosis during pregnancy: a case series and review of 222 cases
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Medicine (Baltimore) 81:260-9. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Galleria mellonella and the study of fungal pathogenesis: making the case for another genetically tractable model host
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Gray 5, GRJ 504, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mycopathologia 165:1-3. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Central nervous system aspergillosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Report of 6 cases and review
    E Mylonakis
    Infectious Disease Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114 2696, USA
    Medicine (Baltimore) 79:269-80. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications65

  1. pmc The temperature-sensitive role of Cryptococcus neoformans ROM2 in cell morphogenesis
    Beth Burgwyn Fuchs
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e368. 2007
    ..These results indicate that in C. neoformans, ROM2 is important at restrictive temperature conditions and is involved in several cell maintenance functions...
  2. pmc Identification of antifungal compounds active against Candida albicans using an improved high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans assay
    Ikechukwu Okoli
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e7025. 2009
    ..This assay also allowed the assessment of the relative minimal inhibitory concentration, the effective concentration in vivo, and the toxicity of the compound in a single assay...
  3. pmc Antifungal activity of microbial secondary metabolites
    Jeffrey J Coleman
    Harvard Medical School, Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e25321. 2011
    ..As A. fumigatus produces gliotoxin in vivo, we propose that in addition to being a virulence factor, gliotoxin may also provide an advantage to A. fumigatus when infecting a host that harbors other opportunistic fungi...
  4. ncbi request reprint Update on the epidemiology and management of cryptococcal meningitis
    Athanasios Desalermos
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Infectious Disease Division, Department of Medicine, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA 1 617 726 3812 1 617 724 7416
    Expert Opin Pharmacother 13:783-9. 2012
    ..Also, the combination of amphotericin B with fluconazole seems to be a reasonable alternative, while fluconazole with flucytosine is superior to fluconazole monotherapy...
  5. pmc Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates
    Juliana C Junqueira
    Department of Biosciences and Oral Diagnosis, Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Eng, Francisco José Longo, Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil
    BMC Microbiol 11:247. 2011
    ..We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival...
  6. ncbi request reprint The art of serendipity: killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by human pathogens as a model of bacterial and fungal pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 55 Fruit Street, Gray 5, GRJ 504, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 1:167-73. 2003
    ..In contrast, the Caenorhabditis elegans model allows rapid identification of mutants in microbial genes associated with pathogenesis and then these phenotypes can be confirmed in a relevant mammalian model...
  7. pmc Galleria mellonella as a model system to study Cryptococcus neoformans pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit St, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 73:3842-50. 2005
    ..The G. mellonella-C. neoformans pathogenicity model may be a substitute for mammalian models of infection with C. neoformans and may facilitate the in vivo study of fungal virulence and efficacy of antifungal therapies...
  8. ncbi request reprint Listeriosis during pregnancy: a case series and review of 222 cases
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Medicine (Baltimore) 81:260-9. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Galleria mellonella and the study of fungal pathogenesis: making the case for another genetically tractable model host
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Gray 5, GRJ 504, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mycopathologia 165:1-3. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Central nervous system aspergillosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Report of 6 cases and review
    E Mylonakis
    Infectious Disease Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114 2696, USA
    Medicine (Baltimore) 79:269-80. 2000
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Plasma viral load testing in the management of HIV infection
    E Mylonakis
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Am Fam Physician 63:483-90, 495-6. 2001
    ..PVL testing may be helpful in the rare instance of indeterminate HIV antibody testing, especially in a patient with recent infection...
  12. ncbi request reprint Report of a false-positive HIV test result and the potential use of additional tests in establishing HIV serostatus
    E Mylonakis
    Infectious Disease Division, Massachussets General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 2696
    Arch Intern Med 160:2386-8. 2000
    ..False-positive HIV test results are uncommon, but they can occur. In the appropriate clinical setting, follow-up and the use of other laboratory tests, such as determination of plasma viral load, may help identify such cases...
  13. ncbi request reprint When to suspect and how to monitor babesiosis
    E Mylonakis
    Infectious Diseases Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA
    Am Fam Physician 63:1969-74. 2001
    ..Exchange transfusion, together with antibabesial chemotherapy, may be necessary in critically ill patients...
  14. pmc Candida albicans hyphal formation and virulence assessed using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model
    Read Pukkila-Worley
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 8:1750-8. 2009
    ..elegans, including the recently described CAS5 and ADA2 genes. These studies in a C. elegans-C. albicans infection model provide insights into the virulence mechanisms of an important human pathogen...
  15. doi request reprint Medically important bacterial-fungal interactions
    Anton Y Peleg
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 8:340-9. 2010
    ..This Review describes the clinical and molecular characteristics of bacterial-fungal interactions that are relevant to human disease...
  16. pmc Role of filamentation in Galleria mellonella killing by Candida albicans
    Beth Burgwyn Fuchs
    Division of Infectious Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Microbes Infect 12:488-96. 2010
    ..mellonella and suggest other virulence factors may be associated with genes that regulate filamentation...
  17. pmc Evolutionarily conserved recognition and innate immunity to fungal pathogens by the scavenger receptors SCARF1 and CD36
    Terry K Means
    Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Exp Med 206:637-53. 2009
    ..Binding of these pathogens to SCARF1 and CD36 was beta-glucan dependent. Thus, CED-1/SCARF1 and C03F11.3/CD36 are beta-glucan binding receptors and define an evolutionarily conserved pathway for the innate sensing of fungal pathogens...
  18. pmc Antifungal drug discovery through the study of invertebrate model hosts
    R Pukkila-Worley
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Curr Med Chem 16:1588-95. 2009
    ..The identification of CAPE in a C. elegans screen supports the hypothesis that this model can identify compounds with both antifungal and host immunomodulatory activity...
  19. doi request reprint The bacterial signalling molecule indole attenuates the virulence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans
    S Oh
    Department of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    J Appl Microbiol 113:622-8. 2012
    ..Here, we explored the effect of bacterial indole and one of its main derivatives on the virulence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans...
  20. ncbi request reprint Persistent parvovirus B19 related anemia of seven years' duration in an HIV-infected patient: complete remission associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy
    E Mylonakis
    Department of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA
    Am J Hematol 60:164-6. 1999
    ..Aggressive antiretroviral treatment may effectively diminish transfusion requirements among HIV-infected individuals with pure RBC aplasia resulting from parvovirus B19 infection...
  21. ncbi request reprint Using non-mammalian hosts to study fungal virulence and host defense
    Beth Burgwyn Fuchs
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 9:346-51. 2006
    ..These heterologous non-mammalian hosts highlight the similarities and differences between different hosts in fungal pathogenesis and they complement studies in mammalian systems and those using other genetic approaches...
  22. ncbi request reprint The pursuit of cryptococcal pathogenesis: heterologous hosts and the study of cryptococcal host-pathogen interactions
    Roanna London
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    FEMS Yeast Res 6:567-73. 2006
    ..The study of host-pathogen interactions using these model hosts has allowed rapid screening of mutant libraries and can be used for the study of evolutionarily preserved aspects of microbial virulence and host response...
  23. pmc Cryptococcus neoformans gene involved in mammalian pathogenesis identified by a Caenorhabditis elegans progeny-based approach
    Robin J Tang
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 73:8219-25. 2005
    ..We propose that a screen for progeny-permissive mutants of microorganisms can serve as a high-throughput method for identifying novel loci related to mammalian pathogenesis...
  24. pmc Worms and flies as genetically tractable animal models to study host-pathogen interactions
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 73:3833-41. 2005
  25. ncbi request reprint Cryptococcus neoformans Kin1 protein kinase homologue, identified through a Caenorhabditis elegans screen, promotes virulence in mammals
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mol Microbiol 54:407-19. 2004
    ..These findings show that the C. neoformans Kin1 kinase homologue is required for full virulence in disparate hosts and that C. elegans can be used as a substitute host to identify novel factors involved in fungal pathogenesis in mammals...
  26. pmc Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Cryptococcus neoformans as a model of yeast pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:15675-80. 2002
    ..neoformans with environmental predators such as free-living nematodes and amoebae and suggest that C. elegans can be used as a simple model host in which C. neoformans pathogenesis can be readily studied...
  27. ncbi request reprint Cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis associated with oxacillin
    P Koutkia
    Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Boston Medical Center, Boston University, 88 East Newton Street, Evans Building, Room 201, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 39:191-4. 2001
    ..Oxacillin should be included among the drugs that can cause leucocytoclastic vasculitis...
  28. pmc Prokaryote-eukaryote interactions identified by using Caenorhabditis elegans
    Anton Y Peleg
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:14585-90. 2008
    ..elegans and by use of genetic manipulation, provides a whole-animal model system to investigate the complex dynamics of a polymicrobial infection...
  29. ncbi request reprint Posaconazole: a new broad-spectrum antifungal agent
    Douglas S Kwon
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 2696, USA
    Expert Opin Pharmacother 8:1167-78. 2007
    ..The wide spectrum activity of posaconazole in in vitro studies, animal models and preliminary clinical studies suggest that posaconazole represents an important addition to the antifungal armamentarium...
  30. doi request reprint A C. elegans-based, whole animal, in vivo screen for the identification of antifungal compounds
    Emmanouil Tampakakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Nat Protoc 3:1925-31. 2008
    ..The screening assay takes about 5-6 d depending on the experimental design...
  31. pmc Virulence effect of Enterococcus faecalis protease genes and the quorum-sensing locus fsr in Caenorhabditis elegans and mice
    Costi D Sifri
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Infect Immun 70:5647-50. 2002
    ..These data show that extracellular proteases and the quorum-sensing fsr system are important for E. faecalis virulence in two highly divergent hosts: nematodes and mice...
  32. pmc Interaction of Candida albicans with an intestinal pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium
    Emmanouil Tampakakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 8:732-7. 2009
    ..Typhimurium, reduces the viability of the eukaryote, C. albicans. Identifying the molecular mechanisms of this interaction may provide important insights into microbial pathogenesis...
  33. pmc Galleria mellonella as a model system to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis and therapeutics
    Anton Y Peleg
    Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:2605-9. 2009
    ..G. mellonella is a relatively simple, nonmammalian model system that can be used to facilitate the in vivo study of host-pathogen interactions in A. baumannii and the efficacy of antibacterial agents...
  34. pmc Characterization of plant-derived saponin natural products against Candida albicans
    Jeffrey J Coleman
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 5:321-32. 2010
    ..The large proportion of compounds identified as antifungal agents containing saponin structural features suggests it may be a suitable chemical scaffold for a new generation of antifungal compounds...
  35. ncbi request reprint New agents for the treatment of fungal infections: clinical efficacy and gaps in coverage
    Elias K Spanakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 43:1060-8. 2006
    ..However, significant questions remain, including the management of breakthrough infections and treatment failures and the efficacy of the new antifungal agents against less common fungi...
  36. ncbi request reprint Newer triazole antifungal agents: pharmacology, spectrum, clinical efficacy and limitations
    George Aperis
    Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 2696, USA
    Expert Opin Investig Drugs 15:579-602. 2006
    ..For all newer triazoles, concerns about emerging drug-resistant fungi and the incidence and management of breakthrough infections will dictate their role in antifungal prophylaxis and treatment...
  37. pmc The Enterococcus faecalis fsrB gene, a key component of the fsr quorum-sensing system, is associated with virulence in the rabbit endophthalmitis model
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 70:4678-81. 2002
    ..Complementation of mutation restored virulence. These data corroborate the role of fsrB in E. faecalis pathogenesis and suggest that the rabbit endophthalmitis model can be used to study the in vivo role of quorum sensing...
  38. ncbi request reprint Clostridium difficile--Associated diarrhea: A review
    E Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Gray-Jackson 504, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Arch Intern Med 161:525-33. 2001
    ..Measures for preventing the spread of the pathogen, appropriate diagnostic testing, and treatment may avert morbidity and mortality due to C difficile-associated diarrhea...
  39. ncbi request reprint Diagnosis and treatment of androgen deficiency in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men and women
    E Mylonakis
    Infectious Disease Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 33:857-64. 2001
    ....
  40. pmc A simple model host for identifying Gram-positive virulence factors
    D A Garsin
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:10892-7. 2001
    ..We exploit the apparent parallels between Gram-positive infection in simple and more complex organisms by using the nematode to identify an E. faecalis virulence factor, ScrB, which is relevant to mammalian pathogenesis...
  41. pmc Cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide produced by Enterococcus faecium
    Terence I Moy
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 72:4512-20. 2004
    ..faecium-mediated killing. These results suggest that hydrogen peroxide produced by E. faecium has cytotoxic effects and highlight the utility of C. elegans pathogenicity models for identifying bacterial virulence factors...
  42. pmc Galleria mellonella as a model host to study infection by the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain
    George Aperis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Microbes Infect 9:729-34. 2007
    ..Delayed drug treatment reduced the efficacy of antibacterials and especially streptomycin. The G. mellonella-F. tularensis LVS system may facilitate the in vivo study of F. tularensis, efficacy with antibacterial agents...
  43. pmc Efflux in fungi: la pièce de résistance
    Jeffrey J Coleman
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 5:e1000486. 2009
    ..In addition, we examine the current knowledge of these transporters in resistance of pathogens to clinically relevant antifungal agents...
  44. ncbi request reprint Developments in the treatment of candidiasis: more choices and new challenges
    George Aperis
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Expert Opin Investig Drugs 15:1319-36. 2006
    ..causing the infection. Studies are needed to investigate the possible development of resistance and the efficacy of these antifungal agents against the more resistant Candida spp...
  45. pmc Antifungal chemical compounds identified using a C. elegans pathogenicity assay
    Julia Breger
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 3:e18. 2007
    ..Compounds identified in the screen that affect the virulence of Candida in vivo can potentially be used as "probe compounds" and may have antifungal activity against other fungi...
  46. ncbi request reprint Epidemiology and management of cryptococcal meningitis: developments and challenges
    Read Pukkila-Worley
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 2696, USA
    Expert Opin Pharmacother 9:551-60. 2008
    ..However, the mortality from this infection remains unacceptably high and we are faced with the specific challenges in the management of this disease...
  47. pmc Caenorhabditis elegans-based model systems for antifungal drug discovery
    Cleo G Anastassopoulou
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Curr Pharm Des 17:1225-33. 2011
    ..elegans-C. albicans antifungal discovery assay holds even greater promise for the identification of novel antifungal agents in the near future...
  48. pmc Killing of Candida albicans filaments by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is mediated by sopB effectors, parts of a type III secretion system
    Younghoon Kim
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 10:782-90. 2011
    ..Typhimurium in order to selectively compete with fungal pathogens. These findings highlight a new role for TTSS of S. Typhimurium in the intestinal tract and may further explain the evolution and maintenance of these traits...
  49. pmc Statin therapy and decreased incidence of positive Candida cultures among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoing gastrointestinal surgery
    Elias K Spanakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 2696, USA
    Mayo Clin Proc 85:1073-9. 2010
    ..To assess whether statin therapy decreases the incidence of cultures positive for Candida species among high-risk hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM)...
  50. pmc Challenge of Drosophila melanogaster with Cryptococcus neoformans and role of the innate immune response
    Yiorgos Apidianakis
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital Shriner s Burns Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 3:413-9. 2004
    ..However, the Toll pathway was necessary for the clearance of C. neoformans introduced directly into the hemolymph of D. melanogaster and for the survival of systemically infected flies...
  51. ncbi request reprint Antifungal use in HIV infection
    Francisco Marty
    Infectious Disease Division, Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women s Hospitals, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
    Expert Opin Pharmacother 3:91-102. 2002
    ..An exciting new decade in antifungal therapy is beginning, in which the second-generation triazoles and echinocandins will hopefully help us to overcome the limitations of the current antifungal arsenal...
  52. pmc Photodynamic therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in a mouse skin abrasion model
    Tianhong Dai
    Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Lasers Surg Med 42:38-44. 2010
    ..The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of MRSA infection in skin abrasion wounds using a mouse model...
  53. pmc Susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to photodynamic inactivation is associated with cell wall integrity
    Beth Burgwyn Fuchs
    Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02144, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 51:2929-36. 2007
    ..These studies demonstrated that C. neoformans is sensitive to photodynamic therapy and illustrated the significance of cell wall integrity in microbial susceptibility to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation...
  54. pmc Our paths might cross: the role of the fungal cell wall integrity pathway in stress response and cross talk with other stress response pathways
    Beth Burgwyn Fuchs
    Harvard Medical School, Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 8:1616-25. 2009
    ..In this article, we highlight several of the cross talk events that have been described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and several other fungi...
  55. pmc Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin influences pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus infection
    Anton Y Peleg
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    J Infect Dis 199:532-6. 2009
    ..These results show that G. mellonella can be effectively used to facilitate the in vivo study of S. aureus virulence and, more specifically, the relationship between antibiotic drug resistance and the pathogenesis of infection...
  56. pmc The tangled web of signaling in innate immunity
    Jeffrey J Coleman
    Division of Infection Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 5:313-5. 2009
    ..2009) and Ren et al. (2009) demonstrate that a protein kinase C delta homolog in C. elegans is involved in innate immunity, providing evidence that the conservation of immune signaling networks extends further than previously thought...
  57. pmc Exploiting amoeboid and non-vertebrate animal model systems to study the virulence of human pathogenic fungi
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    PLoS Pathog 3:e101. 2007
    ..This review aims to assist researchers in identifying appropriate invertebrate systems for the study of particular aspects of fungal pathogenesis...
  58. pmc Eca1, a sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, is involved in stress tolerance and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans
    Weihua Fan
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Infect Immun 75:3394-405. 2007
    ..Eca1 is likely involved in maintaining ER function, thus contributing to stress tolerance and virulence acting in parallel with Ca2+-calcineurin signaling...
  59. pmc Loss of cell wall alpha(1-3) glucan affects Cryptococcus neoformans from ultrastructure to virulence
    Amy J Reese
    Department of Biological Sciences, Cedar Crest College, Allentown, PA 18104 6196, USA
    Mol Microbiol 63:1385-98. 2007
    ..The mutants were unable to grow ina mouse model of infection, but caused death in nematodes. These studies integrate morphological and biochemical investigations of the role of alpha glucan in the cryptococcal cell wall...
  60. pmc Contribution of gelatinase, serine protease, and fsr to the pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecalis endophthalmitis
    Michael Engelbert
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, USA
    Infect Immun 72:3628-33. 2004
    ..This increased attenuation suggests that there are possible additional pleiotropic effects of the defect in fsr on expression of traits contributing to the pathogenesis of enterococcal infection...
  61. pmc Characterization and regulation of the trehalose synthesis pathway and its importance in the pathogenicity of Cryptococcus neoformans
    Elizabeth Wills Petzold
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Infect Immun 74:5877-87. 2006
    ..These studies in C. neoformans and previous studies in other pathogenic fungi support the view of the trehalose pathway as a selective fungicidal target for use in antifungal development...
  62. pmc Disruption of the Aspergillus fumigatus gene encoding nucleolar protein CgrA impairs thermotolerant growth and reduces virulence
    Ruchi Bhabhra
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 231 Bethesda Ave, OH 45267 0529, USA
    Infect Immun 72:4731-40. 2004
    ..Together, these findings establish the intracellular localization of CgrA in A. fumigatus and demonstrate that cgrA is required for thermotolerant growth and wild-type virulence of the organism...
  63. doi request reprint A nuclear receptor-like pathway regulating multidrug resistance in fungi
    Jitendra K Thakur
    Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nature 452:604-9. 2008
    ..This detailed mechanistic understanding of a fungal nuclear receptor-like gene regulatory pathway provides novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of multidrug-resistant fungal infections...
  64. pmc Cryptococcus neoformans {alpha} strains preferentially disseminate to the central nervous system during coinfection
    Kirsten Nielsen
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, 322 CARL Building, Research Drive, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Infect Immun 73:4922-33. 2005
    ..These studies reveal the first virulence difference between congenic a and alpha strains in the most common pathogenic variety and suggest an explanation for the prevalence of alpha strains in clinical isolates...

Research Grants4

  1. A C.elegans high-throughput assay for the identification of new antifungal agents
    Eleftherios Mylonakis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  2. A C.elegans high-throughput assay for the identification of new antifungal agents
    Eleftherios Mylonakis; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  3. C.elegans as a model system forC.neoformans pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Because C. neoformanshas similarities with other pathogenic yeasts, we expect that our findings will facilitate the study of fungus/host interaction in general. ..