ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Designing materials for biology and medicine
    Robert Langer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building E25 342, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nature 428:487-92. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint An audience with... Robert S. Langer [interviewed by Kenneth J. Germeshausen]
    Robert S Langer
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 3:546. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Aliphatic ionenes as gene delivery agents: elucidation of structure-function relationship through modification of charge density and polymer length
    Alexander N Zelikin
    M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department, Vorob evi Gori V 234, 119899, Russia
    Bioconjug Chem 13:548-53. 2002
  4. doi request reprint Plasma membrane recovery kinetics of a microfluidic intracellular delivery platform
    Armon Sharei
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Integr Biol (Camb) 6:470-5. 2014
  5. doi request reprint Skin permeabilization for transdermal drug delivery: recent advances and future prospects
    Carl M Schoellhammer
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 76 661, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 1 617 253 3107 1 617 258 8827
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 11:393-407. 2014
  6. doi request reprint Biomaterials and biotechnology: from the discovery of the first angiogenesis inhibitors to the development of controlled drug delivery systems and the foundation of tissue engineering
    Robert Langer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 101:2449-55. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Leading the way in biomedical engineering: an interview with Robert Langer. Interview by Hannah Stanwix, Commissioning Editor
    Robert Langer
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 7:1483-4. 2012
  8. ncbi request reprint Transdermal drug delivery: past progress, current status, and future prospects
    Robert Langer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Bldg E25 342, 45 Carleton St, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:557-8. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and characterization of dextran-peptide-methotrexate conjugates for tumor targeting via mediation by matrix metalloproteinase II and matrix metalloproteinase IX
    Ying Chau
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02142, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 15:931-41. 2004
  10. pmc Lipid-like materials for low-dose, in vivo gene silencing
    Kevin T Love
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:1864-9. 2010

Research Grants

  1. High-Throughput Craniofacial tissue engineering
    ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER; Fiscal Year: 2010
  2. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2003
  3. ANGIOGENESIS INHIBITORS FROM SHARK CARTILAGE
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2003
  4. BIOMATERIALS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFF
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2002
  5. Vascularization of engineered cardiac tissue
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
  6. Expanding the Clinical Utility of Ultrasound-Assisted Transdermal Drug Delivery
    ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER; Fiscal Year: 2010
  7. Novel Polymers for Tissue Engineering
    ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER; Fiscal Year: 2010
  8. The MIT-Harvard Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excelle*
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
  9. MICROCHIP DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
  10. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007

Detail Information

Publications80

  1. ncbi request reprint Designing materials for biology and medicine
    Robert Langer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building E25 342, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nature 428:487-92. 2004
    ..These include synthetic replacements for biological tissues, designing materials for specific medical applications, and materials for new applications such as diagnostics and array technologies...
  2. ncbi request reprint An audience with... Robert S. Langer [interviewed by Kenneth J. Germeshausen]
    Robert S Langer
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 3:546. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Aliphatic ionenes as gene delivery agents: elucidation of structure-function relationship through modification of charge density and polymer length
    Alexander N Zelikin
    M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department, Vorob evi Gori V 234, 119899, Russia
    Bioconjug Chem 13:548-53. 2002
    ..These data may be useful for developing correlations and mathematical models to predict synthetic gene delivery vector efficiency...
  4. doi request reprint Plasma membrane recovery kinetics of a microfluidic intracellular delivery platform
    Armon Sharei
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Integr Biol (Camb) 6:470-5. 2014
    ..This work provides insight into the membrane repair process in response to mechanical delivery and could potentially enable the development of improved delivery methods. ..
  5. doi request reprint Skin permeabilization for transdermal drug delivery: recent advances and future prospects
    Carl M Schoellhammer
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 76 661, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 1 617 253 3107 1 617 258 8827
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 11:393-407. 2014
    ..Therefore, methods are needed to safely permeabilize the SC so that ionic and larger molecules may be delivered transdermally...
  6. doi request reprint Biomaterials and biotechnology: from the discovery of the first angiogenesis inhibitors to the development of controlled drug delivery systems and the foundation of tissue engineering
    Robert Langer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 101:2449-55. 2013
    ..In addition, new paradigms for creating biomaterials, early work on nanotechnology in medicine and intelligent drug delivery systems are discussed...
  7. doi request reprint Leading the way in biomedical engineering: an interview with Robert Langer. Interview by Hannah Stanwix, Commissioning Editor
    Robert Langer
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 7:1483-4. 2012
    ..Professor Langer has founded over 20 biotechnology companies and authored more than 1175 articles. He has over 800 issued or pending patents. Professor Langer is the most cited engineer in history...
  8. ncbi request reprint Transdermal drug delivery: past progress, current status, and future prospects
    Robert Langer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Bldg E25 342, 45 Carleton St, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:557-8. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and characterization of dextran-peptide-methotrexate conjugates for tumor targeting via mediation by matrix metalloproteinase II and matrix metalloproteinase IX
    Ying Chau
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02142, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 15:931-41. 2004
    ..These findings supported the tumor targeting capability of the new conjugates and warranted further investigation with in vivo study...
  10. pmc Lipid-like materials for low-dose, in vivo gene silencing
    Kevin T Love
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:1864-9. 2010
    ..03 mg/kg. To our knowledge, this formulation facilitates gene silencing at orders-of-magnitude lower doses than required by any previously described siRNA liver delivery system...
  11. doi request reprint Self-assembled lipid--polymer hybrid nanoparticles: a robust drug delivery platform
    Liangfang Zhang
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Division of Health Science and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    ACS Nano 2:1696-702. 2008
    ..The NP is prepared by self-assembly through a single-step nanoprecipitation method in a reproducible and predictable manner, making it potentially suitable for scale-up...
  12. ncbi request reprint A family of hierarchically self-assembling linear-dendritic hybrid polymers for highly efficient targeted gene delivery
    Kris C Wood
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 66 546, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 44:6704-8. 2005
  13. pmc Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering
    Michael Goldberg
    Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E25 342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 18:241-68. 2007
    ..This review summarizes the most recent development in utilizing nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering...
  14. ncbi request reprint Neurotrophin-induced differentiation of human embryonic stem cells on three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds
    Shulamit Levenberg
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 02139, USA
    Tissue Eng 11:506-12. 2005
    ..In addition, vascular structures were found throughout the engineered tissues when cultured with the neurotrophins, but not in the presence of RA...
  15. pmc Controlled degradation and mechanical behavior of photopolymerized hyaluronic acid networks
    Jason A Burdick
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Biomacromolecules 6:386-91. 2005
    ..Finally, auricular swine chondrocytes produced neocartilage when photoencapsulated in the hyaluronic acid networks. This work presents a next step toward the development of advanced in vivo curable biomaterials...
  16. ncbi request reprint Micromolding of shape-controlled, harvestable cell-laden hydrogels
    Judy Yeh
    Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, and Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02115, USA
    Biomaterials 27:5391-8. 2006
    ..Further development of this technique may lead to applications in 3D co-cultures for tissue/organ regeneration and cell-based assays in which it is important to mimic the architectural intricacies of physiological cell-cell interactions...
  17. ncbi request reprint A porous photocurable elastomer for cell encapsulation and culture
    Sharon Gerecht
    Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 28:4826-35. 2007
    ..We therefore propose that porous PGSA scaffolds can provide a logistical template for 3D growth of cells and tissue engineering...
  18. pmc Development of lipidoid-siRNA formulations for systemic delivery to the liver
    Akin Akinc
    Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Mol Ther 17:872-9. 2009
    ..The lead formulation developed is liver targeted (>90% injected dose distributes to liver) and can induce fully reversible, long-duration gene silencing without loss of activity following repeat administration...
  19. ncbi request reprint Interplay of biomaterials and micro-scale technologies for advancing biomedical applications
    Ali Khademhosseini
    Harvard Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 17:1221-40. 2006
    ..This review aims to present an overview of the merger of micro-scale technologies and biomaterials in two-dimensional (2D) surface patterning, device fabrication and three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineering applications...
  20. doi request reprint Evaluation of viscoelastic poly(ethylene glycol) sols as vitreous substitutes in an experimental vitrectomy model in rabbits
    Christopher D Pritchard
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Acta Biomater 7:936-43. 2011
    ..The results provide promising preliminary results on the use of PEG hydrogels as a vitreous substitute...
  21. doi request reprint An injectable thiol-acrylate poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for sustained release of methylprednisolone sodium succinate
    Christopher D Pritchard
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 32:587-97. 2011
    ..The rational design of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the hydrogel makes it a potentially promising candidate for injectable applications...
  22. ncbi request reprint Nanofabrication and microfabrication of functional materials for tissue engineering
    Hyoungshin Park
    Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Tissue Eng 13:1867-77. 2007
    ..It is our opinion that these novel materials and technologies will bring engineered tissues one step closer to practical application in the clinic. This review discusses their application to cardiac, liver, and nerve tissue engineering...
  23. pmc Poly-beta amino ester-containing microparticles enhance the activity of nonviral genetic vaccines
    Steven R Little
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:9534-9. 2004
    ..When used as vaccines in vivo, these microparticle formulations, unlike conventional formulations, induce antigen-specific rejection of transplanted syngenic tumor cells...
  24. pmc Nanoparticulate cellular patches for cell-mediated tumoritropic delivery
    Hao Cheng
    The David H Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Instituteof Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    ACS Nano 4:625-31. 2010
    ..These results provide a novel strategy to actively deliver nanostructures and therapeutics to tumors utilizing stem cells as carriers and also suggest that nanoparticulate cellular patches may have applications in tissue regeneration...
  25. ncbi request reprint Microengineered hydrogels for tissue engineering
    Ali Khademhosseini
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 28:5087-92. 2007
    ..We will initially provide an overview of the various approaches that can be used to synthesize hydrogels with controlled features and will subsequently discuss the emerging applications of these hydrogels...
  26. pmc Synthesis and characterization of photocurable elastomers from poly(glycerol-co-sebacate)
    Christiaan L E Nijst
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Harvard MIT Division of Health Science and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomacromolecules 8:3067-73. 2007
    ..These photocurable degradable elastomers could have potential application for the encapsulation of temperature-sensitive factors and cells for tissue engineering...
  27. pmc Bioinspired materials for controlling stem cell fate
    Omar Z Fisher
    David H Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Acc Chem Res 43:419-28. 2010
    ..In presenting these efforts within the framework of synthetic biology, we anticipate that future researchers may exploit synthetic polymers to create microenvironments that control stem cell behavior in clinically relevant ways...
  28. pmc Tetanus toxin C fragment-conjugated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to neurons
    Seth A Townsend
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 28:5176-84. 2007
    ..TTC-conjugated nanoparticles have the potential to serve as drug delivery vehicles targeted to the central nervous system...
  29. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of the porosity, the tortuosity, and the hindrance factor for the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic permeants in the context of the aqueous pore pathway hypothesis using dual-radiolabeled permeability experiments
    Joseph Kushner
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Pharm Sci 96:3263-82. 2007
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Development and therapeutic applications of advanced biomaterials
    Jeffrey M Karp
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:454-9. 2007
    ....
  31. doi request reprint Microfabrication of homogenous, asymmetric cell-laden hydrogel capsules
    Tram T Dang
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 30:6896-902. 2009
    ..This new cell encapsulation approach enables a practical route to an inexpensive and convenient process for the generation of cell-laden microcapsules without requiring any specialized equipment or microfabrication process...
  32. pmc Precise engineering of targeted nanoparticles by using self-assembled biointegrated block copolymers
    Frank Gu
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Harvard MIT Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:2586-91. 2008
    ..This approach may contribute to further development of targeted NPs as highly selective and effective therapeutic modalities...
  33. pmc A biodegradable and biocompatible gecko-inspired tissue adhesive
    Alborz Mahdavi
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 4307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:2307-12. 2008
    ..This gecko-inspired medical adhesive may have potential applications for sealing wounds and for replacement or augmentation of sutures or staples...
  34. pmc A combinatorial library of lipid-like materials for delivery of RNAi therapeutics
    Akin Akinc
    David H Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 26:561-9. 2008
    ..The studies reported here suggest that these materials may have broad utility for both local and systemic delivery of RNA therapeutics...
  35. pmc High throughput optimization of stem cell microenvironments
    Fan Yang
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Comb Chem High Throughput Screen 12:554-61. 2009
    ..In contrast to conventional approaches, screening combinatorial libraries can result in the discovery of unexpected material solutions to these complex problems...
  36. ncbi request reprint Microfluidic patterning for fabrication of contractile cardiac organoids
    Ali Khademhosseini
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomed Microdevices 9:149-57. 2007
    ..After 3 days in culture, the linearly aligned myocytes detached from the surface and formed contractile cardiac organoids. The procedure can be utilized to simply, rapidly and inexpensively create in vitro cardiac tissue models...
  37. pmc Formulation of functionalized PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for in vivo targeted drug delivery
    Jianjun Cheng
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 28:869-76. 2007
    ..22%+/-0.07% of injected dose per gram of tissue; mean+/-SD, n=4, p=0.002). The ability to control NP size together with targeted delivery may result in favorable biodistribution and development of clinically relevant targeted therapies...
  38. ncbi request reprint Differential degradation rates in vivo and in vitro of biocompatible poly(lactic acid) and poly(glycolic acid) homo- and co-polymers for a polymeric drug-delivery microchip
    Amy C R Grayson
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 15:1281-304. 2004
    ..These materials showed thinner fibrous capsules than have been reported for other materials by our laboratory and have suitable biocompatibility and biodegradation rates for an implantable drug-delivery device...
  39. ncbi request reprint Nanoliter-scale synthesis of arrayed biomaterials and application to human embryonic stem cells
    Daniel G Anderson
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 22:863-6. 2004
    ..We simultaneously characterize over 1,700 human embryonic stem cell-material interactions and identify a host of unexpected materials effects that offer new levels of control over human embryonic stem cell behavior...
  40. ncbi request reprint Endothelialized microvasculature based on a biodegradable elastomer
    Christina Fidkowski
    Division of Health Science and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Tissue Eng 11:302-9. 2005
    ..The devices were endothelialized under flow conditions, and part of the lumens reached confluence within 14 days of culture. This approach may lead to tissue-engineered microvasculature that is critical in vital organs engineering...
  41. ncbi request reprint Antitumor efficacy of a novel polymer-peptide-drug conjugate in human tumor xenograft models
    Ying Chau
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Int J Cancer 118:1519-26. 2006
    ..MMP-insensitive conjugates, though able to inhibit tumor growth, caused toxicity in the small intestine and bone marrow...
  42. pmc Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells on three-dimensional polymer scaffolds
    Shulamit Levenberg
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Divisions of Health Sciences and Technology, and Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:12741-6. 2003
    ..This approach provides a unique culture system for addressing questions in cell and developmental biology, and provides a potential mechanism for creating viable human tissue structures for therapeutic applications...
  43. ncbi request reprint Co-culture of human embryonic stem cells with murine embryonic fibroblasts on microwell-patterned substrates
    Ali Khademhosseini
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 27:5968-77. 2006
    ..In addition, these clusters can be recovered from the microwells to generate nearly homogeneous cell aggregates for differentiation experiments...
  44. ncbi request reprint Seeding neural stem cells on scaffolds of PGA, PLA, and their copolymers
    Erin Lavik
    Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 198:89-97. 2002
  45. ncbi request reprint Investigation of targeting mechanism of new dextran-peptide-methotrexate conjugates using biodistribution study in matrix-metalloproteinase-overexpressing tumor xenograft model
    Ying Chau
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 02142, USA
    J Pharm Sci 95:542-51. 2006
    ..The difference in the systemic side effects observed for conjugates with different linkers could probably be attributed to their varying susceptibility towards enzymes in normal tissues...
  46. ncbi request reprint In vivo degradation characteristics of poly(glycerol sebacate)
    Yadong Wang
    Department of Chemical Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 66:192-7. 2003
    ..Unlike poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide), PGS primarily degrades by surface erosion, which gives a linear degradation profile of mass, preservation of geometry and intact surface, and retention of mechanical strength...
  47. pmc Targeted delivery of cisplatin to prostate cancer cells by aptamer functionalized Pt(IV) prodrug-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles
    Shanta Dhar
    Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:17356-61. 2008
    ..The effectiveness of PSMA targeted Pt-NP-Apt nanoparticles against the PSMA(+) LNCaP cells is approximately an order of magnitude greater than that of free cisplatin...
  48. ncbi request reprint Engineering cartilage-like tissue using human mesenchymal stem cells and silk protein scaffolds
    Lorenz Meinel
    Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E25 330, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Biotechnol Bioeng 88:379-91. 2004
    ..Taken together, these results suggest that silk scaffolds are particularly suitable for tissue engineering of cartilage starting from hMSC, presumably due to their high porosity, slow biodegradation, and structural integrity...
  49. doi request reprint Formulation/preparation of functionalized nanoparticles for in vivo targeted drug delivery
    Frank Gu
    Harvard MIT Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 544:589-98. 2009
    ..This formulation method may contribute to the development of highly selective and effective cancer therapeutic and diagnostic devices...
  50. ncbi request reprint Engineering bone-like tissue in vitro using human bone marrow stem cells and silk scaffolds
    Lorenz Meinel
    Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E25 330, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 71:25-34. 2004
    ....
  51. pmc Tissue-specific gene delivery via nanoparticle coating
    Todd J Harris
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 31:998-1006. 2010
    ..Thus, variations in nanoparticle peptide coating density can alter the tissue-specificity of gene delivery in vivo...
  52. pmc Injectable in situ cross-linking hydrogels for local antifungal therapy
    Sarah P Hudson
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 31:1444-52. 2010
    ..Injectable systems of these types, containing soluble or insoluble drug formulations, could be useful for treatment of local antifungal infections, with or without concurrent systemic therapy...
  53. pmc Biodegradable poly(polyol sebacate) polymers
    Joost P Bruggeman
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton Street, E25 342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 29:4726-35. 2008
    ..PPS polymers demonstrated similar in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility compared to poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)...
  54. pmc A microfabricated scaffold for retinal progenitor cell grafting
    William L Neeley
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 29:418-26. 2008
    ..We conclude that microfabricated poly(glycerol-sebacate) exhibits a number of novel properties for use as a scaffold for RPC delivery...
  55. pmc Single-step assembly of homogenous lipid-polymeric and lipid-quantum dot nanoparticles enabled by microfluidic rapid mixing
    Pedro M Valencia
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    ACS Nano 4:1671-9. 2010
    ..This method for preparation of hybrid NPs in a single mixing step may be useful for combinatorial synthesis of NPs with different properties for imaging and drug delivery applications...
  56. doi request reprint Polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery
    Juliana M Chan
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 624:163-75. 2010
    ..These methods may contribute to the development of other useful polymeric NPs to deliver a spectrum of chemotherapeutic, diagnostic, and imaging agents for various applications...
  57. pmc Effects of ultrasound and sodium lauryl sulfate on the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic permeants: Comparative in vitro studies with full-thickness and split-thickness pig and human skin
    Jennifer E Seto
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Control Release 145:26-32. 2010
    ....
  58. ncbi request reprint Molecular release from a polymeric microreservoir device: Influence of chemistry, polymer swelling, and loading on device performance
    Amy C Richards Grayson
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
    J Biomed Mater Res A 69:502-12. 2004
    ..The amount of drug that was loaded into the reservoirs also did not appear to affect the observed release time of the drug from the device, a significant departure from the behavior of many matrix-type polymeric drug delivery systems...
  59. ncbi request reprint A rapid-curing alginate gel system: utility in periosteum-derived cartilage tissue engineering
    Molly M Stevens
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 25:887-94. 2004
    ..Importantly, the injectable delivery of the gel could be used in filling complex defects in the articular surface via minimally invasive procedures...
  60. ncbi request reprint First-principles, structure-based transdermal transport model to evaluate lipid partition and diffusion coefficients of hydrophobic permeants solely from stratum corneum permeation experiments
    Joseph Kushner
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Pharm Sci 96:3236-51. 2007
    ....
  61. ncbi request reprint Micropatterned cell co-cultures using layer-by-layer deposition of extracellular matrix components
    Junji Fukuda
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 27:1479-86. 2006
    ..This biocompatible co-culture system could potentially provide a new tool to study cell behavior such as cell-cell communication and cell-matrix interactions, as well as tissue-engineering applications...
  62. ncbi request reprint Formulation and characterization of poly (beta amino ester) microparticles for genetic vaccine delivery
    Steven R Little
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Control Release 107:449-62. 2005
    ..However, larger quantities of PBAE may be toxic to cells indicating that the 15% PBAE formulation is a suitable candidate for delivery in future studies with disease specific, DNA vaccines...
  63. ncbi request reprint Gene delivery properties of end-modified poly(beta-amino ester)s
    Gregory T Zugates
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Biological Engineering Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:1887-96. 2007
    ..These results show that the end-modification of poly(beta-amino ester)s is a general strategy to alter functionality and improve the delivery performance of these materials...
  64. ncbi request reprint Collagen composite hydrogels for vocal fold lamina propria restoration
    Mariah S Hahn
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 27:1104-9. 2006
    ..Collagen-alginate hydrogels appear to be promising materials for VF restoration, warranting further investigation...
  65. ncbi request reprint Direct patterning of mammalian cells onto porous tissue engineering substrates using agarose stamps
    Molly M Stevens
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 26:7636-41. 2005
    ..This approach may find use in controlling the spatial invasion of scaffolds, promoting the hierarchical organization of cells, and in controlling cell-cell interactions as a step in preservation of phenotypes of cells...
  66. ncbi request reprint Materials science. Smart biomaterials
    Daniel G Anderson
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Science 305:1923-4. 2004
  67. ncbi request reprint Microfabrication of poly (glycerol-sebacate) for contact guidance applications
    Christopher J Bettinger
    MEMS Technology Group, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 27:2558-65. 2006
    ..Furthermore, these results may lead to further elucidation of the mechanism of cell alignment and contact guidance on microfabricated substrates...
  68. ncbi request reprint Biomaterial microarrays: rapid, microscale screening of polymer-cell interaction
    Daniel G Anderson
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton Street, E25 342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 26:4892-7. 2005
    ....
  69. pmc Enhancement of poly(orthoester) microspheres for DNA vaccine delivery by blending with poly(ethylenimine)
    David N Nguyen
    Division of Health Sciences and Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States
    Biomaterials 29:2783-93. 2008
    ..Combined with the ability to induce maturation of antigen-presenting cells, POE-PEI blended microspheres may be excellent carriers for DNA vaccines...
  70. ncbi request reprint Polyanhydrides: an overview
    Neeraj Kumar
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91120, Israel
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 54:889-910. 2002
    ..Their in vitro and in vivo degradability, toxicity, biocompatibility and applications are discussed in the subsequent chapters of this special issue on polyanhydrides and poly(ortho esters)...
  71. ncbi request reprint Creating an immune-privileged site using retinal progenitor cells and biodegradable polymers
    Tat Fong Ng
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, 20 Staniford Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Stem Cells 25:1552-9. 2007
    ..This technology may be used to promote the survival of nonprivileged grafts (e.g., pancreas, liver, or skin). Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article...
  72. ncbi request reprint Cultivation of human embryonic stem cells without the embryoid body step enhances osteogenesis in vitro
    Jeffrey M Karp
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Room E25 342, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 4307, USA
    Stem Cells 24:835-43. 2006
    ..Together these results demonstrate that culturing hESCs without an EB step can be used to derive large quantities of functional osteogenic cells for bone tissue engineering...
  73. ncbi request reprint Co-delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs from nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugates
    Liangfang Zhang
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Division of Health Science and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    ChemMedChem 2:1268-71. 2007
  74. ncbi request reprint Resorbable polymer microchips releasing BCNU inhibit tumor growth in the rat 9L flank model
    Grace Y Kim
    Division of Health Sciences and Technology, MIT Harvard University, USA
    J Control Release 123:172-8. 2007
    ..The treatment showed similar efficacy to a polymer wafer with the same dosage. The microchip reservoir array may enable delivery of multiple drugs with independent release kinetics and formulations...
  75. pmc Amino alcohol-based degradable poly(ester amide) elastomers
    Christopher J Bettinger
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room E25 342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 29:2315-25. 2008
    ..These polymers exhibit in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. These polymers have projected degradation half-lives up to 20 months in vivo...
  76. ncbi request reprint Dual-channel two-photon microscopy study of transdermal transport in skin treated with low-frequency ultrasound and a chemical enhancer
    Joseph Kushner
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 127:2832-46. 2007
    ..In summary, the skin is greatly perturbed in the LTRs of US treated and US/SLS-treated skin with chemical enhancers playing a significant role in US-mediated transdermal drug delivery...
  77. pmc The use of charge-coupled polymeric microparticles and micromagnets for modulating the bioavailability of orally delivered macromolecules
    Benjamin A Teply
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 29:1216-23. 2008
    ..The corresponding bioavailability of insulin was 5.11% compared with 0.87% for the control group (p=0.007)...
  78. ncbi request reprint Intracellular delivery of core-shell fluorescent silica nanoparticles
    Jason E Fuller
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, 45 Carleton Street, E25 342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 29:1526-32. 2008
    ..As an example of cellular delivery, we demonstrate that these particles can also be complexed with DNA and mediate and trace DNA delivery and gene expression...
  79. ncbi request reprint Biocompatibility analysis of poly(glycerol sebacate) as a nerve guide material
    Cathryn A Sundback
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Wellman 625, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Biomaterials 26:5454-64. 2005
    ..PGS is an excellent candidate material for neural reconstruction applications given its lack of in vitro Schwann cell toxicity and minimal in vivo tissue response...
  80. ncbi request reprint A photolithographic method to create cellular micropatterns
    Jeffrey M Karp
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 02139, USA
    Biomaterials 27:4755-64. 2006
    ..Osteoblasts (SAOS-2) localized in the exposed glass regions (squares, triangles, or circles; 0.063-0.5mm(2)). They proliferated to confluence in 5 days, expressed alkaline phosphatase and produced a mineralized matrix...

Research Grants65

  1. High-Throughput Craniofacial tissue engineering
    ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..A fundamental component of this proposal is to apply and advance our fully automated, high throughput discovery methods to push hESC and iPSC tissue engineering closer towards craniofacial clinical applications. ..
  2. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..The long-term objectives of this research are to develop robust DNA stabilization methods to meet the pharmaceutical requirements for controlled release gene delivery systems. ..
  3. ANGIOGENESIS INHIBITORS FROM SHARK CARTILAGE
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..After screening in the in vitro assays mentioned above, potential anti-angiogenic activity from shark cartilage will be assayed in vivo using the chick chonoallantoic assay and the rabbit corneal pocket assay. ..
  4. BIOMATERIALS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFF
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Mayer and Vacanti at Children's Hospital). ..
  5. Vascularization of engineered cardiac tissue
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The vascularized constructs will be implanted and examined for integration with the host vasculature. We hypothesize that the vessel network created in vitro will promote the vascularization of the tissue in vivo. ..
  6. Expanding the Clinical Utility of Ultrasound-Assisted Transdermal Drug Delivery
    ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The proposed research aims to design a more effective ultrasound-assisted skin treatment regimen in order to deliver a broader class of drugs at therapeutic levels than is currently possible. ..
  7. Novel Polymers for Tissue Engineering
    ROBERT SAMUEL LANGER; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..We will address the overall hypothesis that functional tissue engineering of biomimetic small intestine requires microfabricated elastomeric scaffolds capable of guiding the formation of the mucosa and muscular is propria layers. ..
  8. The MIT-Harvard Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excelle*
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..DESCRIPTION (provided by the applicant): Not provided. ..
  9. MICROCHIP DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..2) Evaluate these combination devices in an in vivo model to determine bioavailability, interactivity and efficacy of multiple compounds released from these devices. ..
  10. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Our best performing polymer-DNA formulations, identified in aims one and two, wilt be assayed in vivo in mice for 1) delivery efficiency, 2) specificity and biodistribution, and 3) complement activation and initial safety profile. ..
  11. Ultrasonic Drug Delivery Via Localized Transport Regions
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  12. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..Model pseudopolyaminoacids, based both on hydroxyproline esters and phenylalanine-glutamine amide anhydrides, will be synthesized and characterized...
  13. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Specifically the work will examine: 1) aggregation in protein solutions, and 2) solid state stability...
  14. Ultrasound Polymeric Drug Delivery
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..4. Mathematical modeling of transdermal transport during LFS: Specifically, develop mathematical models to quantitatively predict the effect of ultrasound on transdermal transport and skin barrier recovery after sonophoresis. ..
  15. CONTROLLED RELEASE OF MACROMOLECULES
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..We will use a number of model proteins with the goal of developing, for the first time, comprehensive guidelines for predicting and enhancing the stability of proteins under pharmaceutically relevant conditions. ..
  16. SURGICAL IMPLANTS FOR SUSTAINED MACROMOLECULAR RELEASE
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 1980
    ....
  17. Novel Polymers for Tissue Engineering
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..5. Implantation and testing of tissue engineered vascular tissues in animal models. ..
  18. ULTRASONIC POLYMERIC DRUG DELIVERY
    Robert Langer; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..We also propose in vivo studies examining the physiological effects of ultrasound, and effects of ultrasound on polymer degradation and drug release...