J K Joung

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts General Hospital
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Rapid mutation of endogenous zebrafish genes using zinc finger nucleases made by Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN)
    Jonathan E Foley
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Cancer Research, and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e4348. 2009
  2. pmc Selection-free zinc-finger-nuclease engineering by context-dependent assembly (CoDA)
    Jeffry D Sander
    Molecular Pathology Unit and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Methods 8:67-9. 2011
  3. pmc Engineered zinc finger nickases induce homology-directed repair with reduced mutagenic effects
    Cherie L Ramirez
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 40:5560-8. 2012
  4. pmc FLASH assembly of TALENs for high-throughput genome editing
    Deepak Reyon
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 30:460-5. 2012
  5. pmc CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes
    Morgan L Maeder
    1 Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 2 Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 3 Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 4 Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Methods 10:977-9. 2013
  6. pmc Efficient genome editing in zebrafish using a CRISPR-Cas system
    Woong Y Hwang
    Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 31:227-9. 2013
  7. pmc Robust, synergistic regulation of human gene expression using TALE activators
    Morgan L Maeder
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Methods 10:243-5. 2013
  8. pmc Synthetic protein-protein interaction domains created by shuffling Cys2His2 zinc-fingers
    Astrid V Giesecke
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Mol Syst Biol 2:2006.2011. 2006
  9. pmc High-frequency off-target mutagenesis induced by CRISPR-Cas nucleases in human cells
    Yanfang Fu
    1 Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 2 Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 3 Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 4 Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 31:822-6. 2013
  10. pmc TALENs: a widely applicable technology for targeted genome editing
    J Keith Joung
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Molecular Pathology Unit, The Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, and the Center for Cancer Research, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, 149 13th Street, 6th Floor, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 14:49-55. 2013

Collaborators

  • JING RUEY JOANNA YEH
  • Jeffry D Sander
  • David J Milan
  • Charles C Hong
  • KENNETH BLOCH
  • Paul B Yu
  • D M Roden
  • Fabrizio C Serluca
  • John D Mably
  • Rodney A Stewart
  • Stefan Kaab
  • Deepak Reyon
  • Randall T Peterson
  • Morgan L Maeder
  • Yanfang Fu
  • Jonathan E Foley
  • David Kokel
  • Samantha J Linder
  • Woong Y Hwang
  • Cherie L Ramirez
  • Tjakko J van Ham
  • David S Peal
  • Chetana Sachidanandan
  • Farshid Dayyani
  • Gromoslaw A Smolen
  • Arpita Mukhopadhyay
  • Astrid V Giesecke
  • Calum A Macrae
  • Quan H Ho
  • James F Angstman
  • Jennifer A Foden
  • Vincent M Cascio
  • Shengdar Q Tsai
  • Cyd Khayter
  • Anton P McCaffrey
  • Claudio Mussolino
  • Andrew M Scharenberg
  • Mathew J Goodwin
  • Michael T Certo
  • Toni Cathomen
  • Thomas J Cradick
  • James Mapes
  • Joseph Pearlberg
  • Quinn P Peterson
  • Jianfeng Wang
  • Erica Tobey
  • Irwin D Bernstein
  • Jonathan H Freedman
  • Dong Er Zhang
  • Ke Dong
  • Toshio Narahashi
  • Eun Young Ahn
  • Richard Nass
  • David A Sweetser
  • Windy A Boyd
  • Benjamin J Schott
  • Dennis C Sgroi
  • A Thomas Look
  • Beth Muir
  • Sven Diederichs
  • Daniel A Haber
  • Heather L Provencher
  • Rui Fang
  • S L Dove
  • Mark C Fishman
  • A Hochschild

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. pmc Rapid mutation of endogenous zebrafish genes using zinc finger nucleases made by Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN)
    Jonathan E Foley
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Cancer Research, and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e4348. 2009
    ..The Consortium has previously used this new method (known as OPEN for Oligomerized Pool ENgineering) to generate high quality ZFN pairs that function in human and plant cells...
  2. pmc Selection-free zinc-finger-nuclease engineering by context-dependent assembly (CoDA)
    Jeffry D Sander
    Molecular Pathology Unit and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Methods 8:67-9. 2011
    ..The simplicity and efficacy of CoDA will enable broad adoption of ZFN technology and make possible large-scale projects focused on multigene pathways or genome-wide alterations...
  3. pmc Engineered zinc finger nickases induce homology-directed repair with reduced mutagenic effects
    Cherie L Ramirez
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 40:5560-8. 2012
    ..ZFNickases thus provide a promising means for inducing HDR-mediated gene modifications while reducing unwanted mutagenesis caused by error-prone NHEJ...
  4. pmc FLASH assembly of TALENs for high-throughput genome editing
    Deepak Reyon
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 30:460-5. 2012
    ..Our results establish the robustness of TALEN technology and demonstrate that FLASH facilitates high-throughput genome editing at a scale not currently possible with other genome modification technologies...
  5. pmc CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes
    Morgan L Maeder
    1 Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 2 Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 3 Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 4 Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Methods 10:977-9. 2013
    ..This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells. ..
  6. pmc Efficient genome editing in zebrafish using a CRISPR-Cas system
    Woong Y Hwang
    Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 31:227-9. 2013
    ....
  7. pmc Robust, synergistic regulation of human gene expression using TALE activators
    Morgan L Maeder
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Methods 10:243-5. 2013
    ..These findings will encourage applications of TALE activators for research and therapy, and guide design of monomeric TALE-based fusion proteins...
  8. pmc Synthetic protein-protein interaction domains created by shuffling Cys2His2 zinc-fingers
    Astrid V Giesecke
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Mol Syst Biol 2:2006.2011. 2006
    ..Our results demonstrate that shuffling of C2H2 ZFs can yield artificial protein-interaction components that should be useful for applications in synthetic biology...
  9. pmc High-frequency off-target mutagenesis induced by CRISPR-Cas nucleases in human cells
    Yanfang Fu
    1 Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 2 Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 3 Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 4 Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 31:822-6. 2013
    ..Our work demonstrates that RGNs can be highly active even with imperfectly matched RNA-DNA interfaces in human cells, a finding that might confound their use in research and therapeutic applications. ..
  10. pmc TALENs: a widely applicable technology for targeted genome editing
    J Keith Joung
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Molecular Pathology Unit, The Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, and the Center for Cancer Research, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, 149 13th Street, 6th Floor, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 14:49-55. 2013
    ..The capability to quickly and efficiently alter genes using TALENs promises to have profound impacts on biological research and to yield potential therapeutic strategies for genetic diseases...
  11. pmc ZFNGenome: a comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms
    Deepak Reyon
    Department of Genetics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
    BMC Genomics 12:83. 2011
    ....
  12. pmc Predicting success of oligomerized pool engineering (OPEN) for zinc finger target site sequences
    Jeffry D Sander
    Molecular Pathology Unit, Center for Cancer Research, and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    BMC Bioinformatics 11:543. 2010
    ..Because generation of ZFPs using OPEN requires considerable effort, a computational method for identifying the sites in any given gene that are most likely to be successfully targeted by this method is desirable...
  13. ncbi request reprint Identifying and modifying protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions using a bacterial two-hybrid selection system
    J K Joung
    Department of Pathology, Division of Molecular Pathology and Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Cell Biochem Suppl . 2001
    ..The ability to easily and rapidly process very large libraries make this system a powerful tool for identifying, modifying, or optimizing protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions...
  14. pmc Loss of TLE1 and TLE4 from the del(9q) commonly deleted region in AML cooperates with AML1-ETO to affect myeloid cell proliferation and survival
    Farshid Dayyani
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Blood 111:4338-47. 2008
    ..This study is the first to implicate the TLEs as potential tumor suppressor genes in myeloid leukemia...
  15. ncbi request reprint Discovery and use of small molecules for probing biological processes in zebrafish
    Randall T Peterson
    Developmental Biology Laboratory, Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Methods Cell Biol 76:569-91. 2004
  16. ncbi request reprint Zebrafish-based small molecule discovery
    Calum A Macrae
    Developmental Biology Laboratory and Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chem Biol 10:901-8. 2003
  17. ncbi request reprint AML1-ETO reprograms hematopoietic cell fate by downregulating scl expression
    Jing Ruey J Yeh
    Developmental Biology Laboratory, Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Development 135:401-10. 2008
    ..Thus, this zebrafish model facilitates in vivo dissection of AML1-ETO-mediated signaling, and will enable large-scale chemical screens to identify suppressors of the in vivo effects of AML1-ETO...
  18. ncbi request reprint Notch1b and neuregulin are required for specification of central cardiac conduction tissue
    David J Milan
    Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Development 133:1125-32. 2006
    ....
  19. pmc Drug-sensitized zebrafish screen identifies multiple genes, including GINS3, as regulators of myocardial repolarization
    David J Milan
    Cardiovascular Research Center, and Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
    Circulation 120:553-9. 2009
    ..Identification of additional genes may lead to a better understanding of the underlying biology, aid in identification of patients at risk for sudden death, and potentially enable new treatments for susceptible individuals...
  20. ncbi request reprint Activation of prokaryotic transcription through arbitrary protein-protein contacts
    S L Dove
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nature 386:627-30. 1997
    ..We also find that when the DNA-bound 'activator' makes contact with two different components of the polymerase, the effect of these two interactions on transcription is synergistic...
  21. pmc A Rap GTPase interactor, RADIL, mediates migration of neural crest precursors
    Gromoslaw A Smolen
    Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Genes Dev 21:2131-6. 2007
    ..We specifically show that these defects are primarily due to the diminished migratory capacity of NC cells. The identification of RADIL as a regulator of NC migration defines a role for the Rap pathway in this process...
  22. pmc Discovering chemical modifiers of oncogene-regulated hematopoietic differentiation
    Jing Ruey J Yeh
    Developmental Biology Laboratory, Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Chem Biol 5:236-43. 2009
    ..This approach may open doors for developing therapeutics targeting oncogene function within leukemic stem cells...
  23. pmc Artery/vein specification is governed by opposing phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and MAP kinase/ERK signaling
    Charles C Hong
    Developmental Biology Laboratory, Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Curr Biol 16:1366-72. 2006
    ..In summary, chemical genetic analysis has uncovered unanticipated opposing roles of PI3K and ERK in artery/vein specification...
  24. ncbi request reprint A noncanonical path to mechanism of action
    Randall T Peterson
    Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Chem Biol 13:924-6. 2006
    ..In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Zhang et al. make clever use of the zebrafish to study the mechanism of the angiogenesis inhibitor fumagillin and reveal that it targets the noncanonical Wnt pathway...
  25. doi request reprint Small molecule screening in zebrafish
    David S Peal
    Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Cardiovasc Transl Res 3:454-60. 2010
    ..The promise of chemical screens in zebrafish to identify novel biologic probes and therapeutic compounds continues to drive this rapidly growing field...
  26. pmc Identification of a novel retinoid by small molecule screening with zebrafish embryos
    Chetana Sachidanandan
    Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1947. 2008
    ....
  27. pmc Dorsomorphin inhibits BMP signals required for embryogenesis and iron metabolism
    Paul B Yu
    Cardiovascular Research Center and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Chem Biol 4:33-41. 2008
    ..These findings suggest an essential physiological role for hepatic BMP signaling in iron-hepcidin homeostasis...
  28. pmc Targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish using customized zinc-finger nucleases
    Jonathan E Foley
    Molecular Pathology Unit and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Protoc 4:1855-67. 2009
    ..Using these methods, zebrafish founders carrying targeted mutations can be identified within 4 months...
  29. pmc Use of non-mammalian alternative models for neurotoxicological study
    Randall T Peterson
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Neurotoxicology 29:546-55. 2008
    ..In this review, applications of four non-mammalian species, zebrafish, cockroach, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans, in the investigation of neurotoxicology and neurological diseases are presented...
  30. pmc Live imaging of apoptotic cells in zebrafish
    Tjakko J van Ham
    Cardiovascular Research Center, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    FASEB J 24:4336-42. 2010
    ..We use this fluorescent probe to characterize patterns of apoptosis in living zebrafish larvae and to visualize neuronal cell death at single-cell resolution in vivo...
  31. ncbi request reprint Fishing for new antimicrobials
    Arpita Mukhopadhyay
    Developmental Biology Laboratory, Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Curr Opin Chem Biol 10:327-33. 2006
    ..The recent development of several infectious disease models in zebrafish raises the possibility of a new paradigm in antimicrobial discovery...
  32. ncbi request reprint Drugs that induce repolarization abnormalities cause bradycardia in zebrafish
    David J Milan
    Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129, USA
    Circulation 107:1355-8. 2003
    ..Current in vitro preclinical assays are limited by biological simplicity, and in vivo models suffer from expense and low throughput...
  33. pmc Chemobehavioural phenomics and behaviour-based psychiatric drug discovery in the zebrafish
    David Kokel
    Cardiovascular Research Center and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Brief Funct Genomic Proteomic 7:483-90. 2008
    ..Thus, behaviour-based chemical screens in the zebrafish may improve our understanding of neurobiology and accelerate the pace of psychiatric drug discovery...

Research Grants15

  1. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WT1
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..More detailed knowledge of the fundamental regulatory circuits in which WT1 plays a central role has important implications for the treatment and diagnosis of developmental disorders and cancer. ..
  2. ADVANCING ZINC FINGER NUCLEASES FOR TARGETED GENOME MANIPULATION
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Successful completion of the aims of this proposal will improve the quality and scope of genetic tools available for use in zebrafish, an important model organism for studying human development and disease. ..
  3. Zinc Finger Protein-Protein Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  4. Studies of NRSF/REST Zinc Finger-DNA Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In addition, our studies will facilitate efforts to create highly specific synthetic DNA-binding domains capable of recognizing unique addresses within mammalian genomes. ..
  5. DNA-binding specificities of Cys2His2 zinc fingers
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  6. Zinc Finger Protein-Protein Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  7. Studies of NRSF/REST Zinc Finger-DNA Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In addition, our studies will facilitate efforts to create highly specific synthetic DNA-binding domains capable of recognizing unique addresses within mammalian genomes. ..
  8. Studies of NRSF/REST Zinc Finger-DNA Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..In addition, our studies will facilitate efforts to create highly specific synthetic DNA-binding domains capable of recognizing unique addresses within mammalian genomes. ..
  9. Zinc Finger Protein-Protein Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  10. Studies of NRSF/REST Zinc Finger-DNA Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In addition, our studies will facilitate efforts to create highly specific synthetic DNA-binding domains capable of recognizing unique addresses within mammalian genomes. ..
  11. Studies of NRSF/REST Zinc Finger-DNA Interactions
    J Joung; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..In addition, our studies will facilitate efforts to create highly specific synthetic DNA-binding domains capable of recognizing unique addresses within mammalian genomes. ..
  12. ADVANCING ZINC FINGER NUCLEASES FOR TARGETED GENOME MANIPULATION
    Randall T Peterson; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Successful completion of the aims of this proposal will improve the quality and scope of genetic tools available for use in zebrafish, an important model organism for studying human development and disease. ..