NEVILLE J HOGAN

Summary

Affiliation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Dynamic primitives in the control of locomotion
    Neville Hogan
    Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, USA
    Front Comput Neurosci 7:71. 2013
  2. pmc Dynamic primitives of motor behavior
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biol Cybern 106:727-39. 2012
  3. pmc A working model of stroke recovery from rehabilitation robotics practitioners
    Hermano Igo Krebs
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Neuroeng Rehabil 6:6. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Physically interactive robotic technology for neuromotor rehabilitation
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Prog Brain Res 192:59-68. 2011
  5. pmc Sensitivity of smoothness measures to movement duration, amplitude, and arrests
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
    J Mot Behav 41:529-34. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Interactive robots for neuro-rehabilitation
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 22:349-58. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Motions or muscles? Some behavioral factors underlying robotic assistance of motor recovery
    Neville Hogan
    Newman Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 43:605-18. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Movement smoothness changes during stroke recovery
    Brandon Rohrer
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Neurosci 22:8297-304. 2002
  9. pmc Stochastic estimation of arm mechanical impedance during robotic stroke rehabilitation
    Jerome J Palazzolo
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 15:94-103. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Effects of robotic therapy on motor impairment and recovery in chronic stroke
    Susan E Fasoli
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Arch Phys Med Rehabil 84:477-82. 2003

Research Grants

  1. NEUROLOGIC RECOVERY WITH ROBOTIC AIDS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 1999
  2. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 1999
  3. NEUROLOGIC RECOVERY WITH ROBOTIC AIDS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2000
  4. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2000
  5. NEUROLOGIC RECOVERY WITH ROBOTIC AIDS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2001
  6. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2001
  7. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2002
  8. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2003

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc Dynamic primitives in the control of locomotion
    Neville Hogan
    Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, USA
    Front Comput Neurosci 7:71. 2013
    ..Some methods to address these challenges are presented. Some implications of this theoretical framework for locomotor rehabilitation are considered. ..
  2. pmc Dynamic primitives of motor behavior
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biol Cybern 106:727-39. 2012
    ..To illustrate how these dynamic primitives may account for complex actions, we briefly review three types of interactive behaviors: constrained motion, impact tasks, and manipulation of dynamic objects...
  3. pmc A working model of stroke recovery from rehabilitation robotics practitioners
    Hermano Igo Krebs
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Neuroeng Rehabil 6:6. 2009
    ..Ultimately, we plan to apply these insights in the development of customized training paradigms to enhance recovery...
  4. doi request reprint Physically interactive robotic technology for neuromotor rehabilitation
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Prog Brain Res 192:59-68. 2011
    ....
  5. pmc Sensitivity of smoothness measures to movement duration, amplitude, and arrests
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
    J Mot Behav 41:529-34. 2009
    ..The authors show that jerk-based measures with dimensions vary counterintuitively with movement smoothness, whereas a dimensionless jerk-based measure properly quantifies common deviations from smooth, coordinated movement...
  6. ncbi request reprint Interactive robots for neuro-rehabilitation
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 22:349-58. 2004
    ..Kinematic studies of the recovery process show that, similar to the development of motor behavior in infants, it begins with stereotyped submovements and proceeds by progressively merging these to approach unimpaired motor performance...
  7. ncbi request reprint Motions or muscles? Some behavioral factors underlying robotic assistance of motor recovery
    Neville Hogan
    Newman Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 43:605-18. 2006
    ..Together these results indicate that movement coordination rather than muscle activation may be the most appropriate focus for robotic therapy...
  8. ncbi request reprint Movement smoothness changes during stroke recovery
    Brandon Rohrer
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Neurosci 22:8297-304. 2002
    ..This pattern was reproduced in a computer simulation of recovery based on submovement blending, suggesting that progressive blending of submovements underlies stroke recovery...
  9. pmc Stochastic estimation of arm mechanical impedance during robotic stroke rehabilitation
    Jerome J Palazzolo
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 15:94-103. 2007
    ..Data was analyzed by spectral procedures that make no assumption about model structure. The method was validated by measuring simple mechanical hardware and results from a patient's hemiplegic arm are presented...
  10. ncbi request reprint Effects of robotic therapy on motor impairment and recovery in chronic stroke
    Susan E Fasoli
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Arch Phys Med Rehabil 84:477-82. 2003
    ..To examine whether robotic therapy can reduce motor impairment and enhance recovery of the hemiparetic arm in persons with chronic stroke...
  11. ncbi request reprint Does shorter rehabilitation limit potential recovery poststroke?
    Susan E Fasoli
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neurorehabil Neural Repair 18:88-94. 2004
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Experimenting with theoretical motor neuroscience
    Robert Ajemian
    McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Mot Behav 42:333-42. 2010
    ..To advance the field, theoreticians must rely more heavily on the concept of falsification by producing models that lend themselves to clear experimental testing...
  13. ncbi request reprint Feasibility of dynamic entrainment with ankle mechanical perturbation to treat locomotor deficit
    Jooeun Ahn
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 02139, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2010:3422-5. 2010
    ....
  14. doi request reprint The curvature and variability of wrist and arm movements
    Steven K Charles
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Exp Brain Res 203:63-73. 2010
    ..We provide evidence indicating that this type of systematic pattern is not likely caused by noise or other neural causes, but may be explained by the unique biomechanics of the wrist...
  15. ncbi request reprint Robotic therapy for chronic motor impairments after stroke: Follow-up results
    Susan E Fasoli
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 3 147, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Arch Phys Med Rehabil 85:1106-11. 2004
    ..To study the effects of robotic rehabilitation in persons with chronic motor impairments after stroke and to examine whether improvements in motor abilities were sustained 4 months after the end of therapy...
  16. doi request reprint Submovement changes characterize generalization of motor recovery after stroke
    Laura Dipietro
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Cortex 45:318-24. 2009
    ..Also, they are consistent with the idea that motor recovery after a stroke shares similar traits with motor learning...
  17. ncbi request reprint A comparison of functional and impairment-based robotic training in severe to moderate chronic stroke: a pilot study
    Hermano Igo Krebs
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    NeuroRehabilitation 23:81-7. 2008
    ..To compare the outcome of training the functional movement of transport of the arm and grasping an object with the alternative of training the transport of the arm in isolation...
  18. pmc Customized interactive robotic treatment for stroke: EMG-triggered therapy
    Laura Dipietro
    Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 13:325-34. 2005
    ..Preliminary experiments aimed at testing the proposed system and gaining insight into the potential of EMG-triggered, robot-assisted therapy are reported...
  19. pmc Robot-aided neurorehabilitation: a robot for wrist rehabilitation
    Hermano Igo Krebs
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 15:327-35. 2007
    ..Here, we report on the initial results on 36 of these volunteers. These results demonstrate that further improvement should be expected by adding additional training to other limb segments...
  20. ncbi request reprint On rhythmic and discrete movements: reflections, definitions and implications for motor control
    Neville Hogan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
    Exp Brain Res 181:13-30. 2007
    ..Conversely, there exist rhythmic movements that cannot be composed of a sequence of discrete movements. As such, this taxonomy may provide a language for studying more complex behaviors in a principled fashion...
  21. ncbi request reprint Robotic technology and stroke rehabilitation: translating research into practice
    Susan E Fasoli
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Top Stroke Rehabil 11:11-9. 2004
    ....

Research Grants8

  1. NEUROLOGIC RECOVERY WITH ROBOTIC AIDS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..Should the hypotheses be falsified, it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to the scientific foundations of neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  2. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..In the case of alternative outcomes it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to a scientific foundation for neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  3. NEUROLOGIC RECOVERY WITH ROBOTIC AIDS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Should the hypotheses be falsified, it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to the scientific foundations of neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  4. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..In the case of alternative outcomes it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to a scientific foundation for neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  5. NEUROLOGIC RECOVERY WITH ROBOTIC AIDS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Should the hypotheses be falsified, it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to the scientific foundations of neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  6. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..In the case of alternative outcomes it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to a scientific foundation for neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  7. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..In the case of alternative outcomes it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to a scientific foundation for neurologic rehabilitation. ..
  8. MOTOR RECOVERY AND MOTOR LEARNING IN STROKE PATIENTS
    Neville Hogan; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..In the case of alternative outcomes it is expected that this systematic approach combined with the quality of robot-based measurements will contribute to a scientific foundation for neurologic rehabilitation. ..