Bruce A Young

Summary

Affiliation: Lafayette College
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Comparative morphology of the cloacal scent gland in snakes (Serpentes: Reptilia)
    B A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania 18042, USA
    Anat Rec 256:127-38. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Snake bioacoustics: toward a richer understanding of the behavioral ecology of snakes
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College Easton, Pennsylvania 18042, USA
    Q Rev Biol 78:303-25. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Response of western diamondback rattlesnakes Crotalus atrox to airborne sounds
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:3087-92. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint The use of ground-borne vibrations for prey localization in the Saharan sand vipers (Cerastes)
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:661-5. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Venom flow in rattlesnakes: mechanics and metering
    B A Young
    Department of Biology and Program in Neuroscience, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:4345-51. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Functional subdivision of the venom gland musculature and the regulation of venom expulsion in rattlesnakes
    B A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania 18042, USA
    J Morphol 246:249-59. 2000
  7. doi request reprint Functional bases of the spatial dispersal of venom during cobra "spitting"
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas 66621, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 82:80-9. 2009
  8. doi request reprint How a heavy-bodied snake strikes quickly: high-power axial musculature in the puff adder (Bitis arietans)
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas, USA
    J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol 313:114-21. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint The buccal buckle: the functional morphology of venom spitting in cobras
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:3483-94. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms controlling venom expulsion in the western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox
    Bruce A Young
    School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 4236, USA
    J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol 307:18-27. 2007

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. ncbi request reprint Comparative morphology of the cloacal scent gland in snakes (Serpentes: Reptilia)
    B A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania 18042, USA
    Anat Rec 256:127-38. 1999
    ..In both cases there was no apparent relationship between phylogeny and the morphological variation of the cloacal scent gland...
  2. ncbi request reprint Snake bioacoustics: toward a richer understanding of the behavioral ecology of snakes
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College Easton, Pennsylvania 18042, USA
    Q Rev Biol 78:303-25. 2003
    ..Nevertheless, given the diversity of habitats in which snakes are found, and their dual auditory pathways, some form of intraspecific acoustic communication may exist in some species...
  3. ncbi request reprint Response of western diamondback rattlesnakes Crotalus atrox to airborne sounds
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:3087-92. 2002
    ..At least one significant behavioural response was observed in 92% of the behavioural trials. This study provides the first experimental evidence that snakes can respond behaviourally to airborne sounds...
  4. ncbi request reprint The use of ground-borne vibrations for prey localization in the Saharan sand vipers (Cerastes)
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:661-5. 2002
    ..cerastes, the first experimental evidence for foraging by vibration detection in snakes and the strongest evidence to date that snakes are capable of 'hearing' vibrational stimuli...
  5. ncbi request reprint Venom flow in rattlesnakes: mechanics and metering
    B A Young
    Department of Biology and Program in Neuroscience, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:4345-51. 2001
    ..With the species and size of target held constant, the duration of venom flow, maximum venom flow rate and total venom volume were all significantly lower in predatory than in defensive strikes...
  6. ncbi request reprint Functional subdivision of the venom gland musculature and the regulation of venom expulsion in rattlesnakes
    B A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania 18042, USA
    J Morphol 246:249-59. 2000
    ..compressor glandulae result in up to a six-fold difference in venom expulsion. This functional specialization may play a role in the regulation of venom flow during offensive and defensive strikes...
  7. doi request reprint Functional bases of the spatial dispersal of venom during cobra "spitting"
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas 66621, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 82:80-9. 2009
    ..These results suggest that the ability to "spit" venom is a unique suite of specializations involving both the axial and the cephalic systems...
  8. doi request reprint How a heavy-bodied snake strikes quickly: high-power axial musculature in the puff adder (Bitis arietans)
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas, USA
    J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol 313:114-21. 2010
    ..Power amplification of the vertebral extensors may be an evolutionary necessity if a large, heavy-bodied snake, like B. arietans, is going to achieve rapid acceleration during the strike...
  9. ncbi request reprint The buccal buckle: the functional morphology of venom spitting in cobras
    Bruce A Young
    Department of Biology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:3483-94. 2004
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms controlling venom expulsion in the western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox
    Bruce A Young
    School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 4236, USA
    J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol 307:18-27. 2007
    ....
  11. doi request reprint The forked tongue and edge detection in snakes (Crotalus oreganus): an experimental test
    M Rockwell Parker
    School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, USA
    J Comp Psychol 122:35-40. 2008
    ..Instead, the deeply forked tongue may represent a chemosensory specialization to increase odor-sampling area, with snakes and derived lizards detecting only the concentration of chemical trails...