M CHRISTINE contact ZINK

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy have reduced central nervous system viral replication and inflammation but persistence of viral DNA
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 202:161-70. 2010
  2. ncbi request reprint Translational research models and novel adjunctive therapies for neuroAIDS
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Broadway Research Building, Suite 839, 733 North Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 2:14-9. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint From mice to macaques--animal models of HIV nervous system disease
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Curr HIV Res 4:293-305. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint A novel simian immunodeficiency virus model that provides insight into mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system disease
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Neurovirol 8:42-8. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Neuroprotective and anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity of minocycline
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    JAMA 293:2003-11. 2005
  6. pmc Coordinated regulation of SIV replication and immune responses in the CNS
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8129. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Progressive selection for neurovirulent genotypes in the brain of SIV-infected macaques
    Tahar Babas
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    AIDS 20:197-205. 2006
  8. pmc Expression of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) nef in astrocytes during acute and terminal infection and requirement of nef for optimal replication of neurovirulent SIV in vitro
    Emily D Overholser
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Virol 77:6855-66. 2003
  9. pmc Resting CD4+ T lymphocytes but not thymocytes provide a latent viral reservoir in a simian immunodeficiency virus-Macaca nemestrina model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Anding Shen
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 77:4938-49. 2003
  10. pmc Mechanisms of minocycline-induced suppression of simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis: inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1
    Susan C Follstaedt
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 14:376-88. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications31

  1. pmc Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy have reduced central nervous system viral replication and inflammation but persistence of viral DNA
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 202:161-70. 2010
    ..During the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the prevalence of HIV-associated central nervous system (CNS) disease has increased despite suppression of plasma viremia...
  2. ncbi request reprint Translational research models and novel adjunctive therapies for neuroAIDS
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Broadway Research Building, Suite 839, 733 North Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 2:14-9. 2007
    ..The session was capped by active discourse among leaders in the field of adjunctive therapies in a broad range of scientific disciplines...
  3. ncbi request reprint From mice to macaques--animal models of HIV nervous system disease
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Curr HIV Res 4:293-305. 2006
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint A novel simian immunodeficiency virus model that provides insight into mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system disease
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Neurovirol 8:42-8. 2002
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Neuroprotective and anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity of minocycline
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    JAMA 293:2003-11. 2005
    ..Current antiretroviral drugs are expensive, have significant adverse effects including neurotoxicity, and few cross the blood-brain barrier...
  6. pmc Coordinated regulation of SIV replication and immune responses in the CNS
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8129. 2009
    ..These studies further suggest that interventions should target HIV-infected individuals with increased CCL2 levels or HIV RNA in the CNS...
  7. ncbi request reprint Progressive selection for neurovirulent genotypes in the brain of SIV-infected macaques
    Tahar Babas
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    AIDS 20:197-205. 2006
    ..To compare the viral genotypes present in RNA from brain and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and DNA from brain during acute, asymptomatic and late stages of SIV infection of macaques...
  8. pmc Expression of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) nef in astrocytes during acute and terminal infection and requirement of nef for optimal replication of neurovirulent SIV in vitro
    Emily D Overholser
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Virol 77:6855-66. 2003
    ....
  9. pmc Resting CD4+ T lymphocytes but not thymocytes provide a latent viral reservoir in a simian immunodeficiency virus-Macaca nemestrina model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Anding Shen
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 77:4938-49. 2003
    ..The results provide the first evidence for a latent viral reservoir for SIV in macaques and the most extensive survey of the distribution of latently infected cells in the host...
  10. pmc Mechanisms of minocycline-induced suppression of simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis: inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1
    Susan C Follstaedt
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 14:376-88. 2008
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal analysis of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication in the lungs: compartmentalized regulation of SIV
    Sheila A Barber
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Infect Dis 194:931-8. 2006
    ..In the present study, we examine virus replication in the lungs and in cells recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples in a comprehensive, longitudinal analysis of an SIV/macaque model...
  12. ncbi request reprint 14-3-3 protein in CSF: an early predictor of SIV CNS disease
    Kristi L Helke
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 2196, USA
    J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 64:202-8. 2005
    ..13). CSF levels of 14-3-3 protein may be a valuable marker of early neuronal damage, CNS viral replication, and CNS disease progression in HIV-infected individuals...
  13. pmc A simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaque model to study viral reservoirs that persist during highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Jason B Dinoso
    Department of Pharmacology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 83:9247-57. 2009
    ....
  14. pmc Role of microglial cells in selective replication of simian immunodeficiency virus genotypes in the brain
    Tahar Babas
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Virol 77:208-16. 2003
    ....
  15. pmc Visna virus-induced activation of MAPK is required for virus replication and correlates with virus-induced neuropathology
    Sheila A Barber
    Division of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 76:817-28. 2002
    ....
  16. pmc CD4-independent entry and replication of simian immunodeficiency virus in primary rhesus macaque astrocytes are regulated by the transmembrane protein
    Emily D Overholser
    The Reterovirus Laboratory, Department of Comparitive Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, 819 BRB, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Virol 79:4944-51. 2005
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Pathogenesis of simian immunodeficiency virus-induced alterations in macaque trigeminal ganglia
    Victoria A Laast
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 66:26-34. 2007
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint The central nervous system is a viral reservoir in simian immunodeficiency virus--infected macaques on combined antiretroviral therapy: a model for human immunodeficiency virus patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Janice E Clements
    Retrovirus Laboratory, Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurovirol 11:180-9. 2005
    ..This suggests that the brain may serve as a long-term viral reservoir in HIV-infected individuals treated with antiretroviral drugs that suppress virus replication...
  19. ncbi request reprint SIV-specific T lymphocyte responses in PBMC and lymphoid tissues of SIV-infected pigtailed macaques during suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy
    Lucy M Carruth
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Jefferson Street Building, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Med Primatol 34:109-21. 2005
    ..Conversely, in the setting of low initial viremia and robust T lymphocyte responses, treatment does not have a detrimental effect on the immune response...
  20. ncbi request reprint The central nervous system as a reservoir for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV): steady-state levels of SIV DNA in brain from acute through asymptomatic infection
    Janice E Clements
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Infect Dis 186:905-13. 2002
    ..Latent virus in the brain must be considered in therapeutic strategies to eliminate HIV from infected persons...
  21. pmc Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis
    Sheila A Barber
    Department of Comparative Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    Am J Pathol 164:355-62. 2004
    ..This shift from classically neuroprotective to neurodegenerative MAPK pathways suggests that agents that inhibit activation of JNK/p38 may be protective against HIV-associated CNS disease...
  22. doi request reprint The accelerated simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurological disease: from mechanism to treatment
    Janice E Clements
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 14:309-17. 2008
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Searching for clues: tracking the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system disease by use of an accelerated, consistent simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model
    Joseph L Mankowski
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 7609, USA
    J Infect Dis 186:S199-208. 2002
    ..This model is ideal to track the viral, cellular, and immunologic changes in the brain during acute and asymptomatic infection and during viral recrudescence and SIV encephalitis...
  24. pmc Novel pathway for induction of latent virus from resting CD4(+) T cells in the simian immunodeficiency virus/macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 latency
    Anding Shen
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Virol 81:1660-70. 2007
    ..This is the first demonstration that costimulatory signals can induce latent virus without the coengagement of the T-cell receptor, and this study might provide insights into potential pathways to target latent HIV-1...
  25. ncbi request reprint Central nervous system correlates of behavioral deficits following simian immunodeficiency virus infection
    Michael R Weed
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Biology Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    J Neurovirol 9:452-64. 2003
    ..Therefore, axonal damage may be a morphologic manifestation of neuronal dysfunction that underlies development of behavioral impairment in HIV/SIV CNS infection...
  26. pmc Severe depletion of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells from the intestinal lamina propria but not peripheral blood or lymph nodes during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection
    Amanda J Chase
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Virol 81:12748-57. 2007
    ..These results indicate that Tregs are rapidly depleted in the GALT of SIV-infected macaques, defining a role for the loss of Treg-mediated suppression in early events in the pathogenesis of the disease...
  27. pmc Altered cutaneous nerve regeneration in a simian immunodeficiency virus / macaque intracutaneous axotomy model
    Gigi J Ebenezer
    Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 7609, USA
    J Comp Neurol 514:272-83. 2009
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint Impaired performance on the object retrieval-detour test of executive function in the SIV/macaque model of AIDS
    Rachel A Gray
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 22:1031-5. 2006
    ..Given the sensitivity of ORD performance to dopaminergic dysfunction, these results further implicate dopaminergic dysfunction as a mechanism of cognitive and motor impairments in NeuroAIDS...
  29. pmc Regulatory T cells enhance persistence of the zoonotic pathogen Seoul virus in its reservoir host
    Judith D Easterbrook
    The W Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:15502-7. 2007
    ..These data provide evidence of regulatory T cell involvement in the persistence of a zoonotic pathogen in its natural reservoir host...
  30. pmc Dose-dependent protection against or exacerbation of disease by a polylactide glycolide microparticle-adsorbed, alphavirus-based measles virus DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques
    Chien Hsiung Pan
    W Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Clin Vaccine Immunol 15:697-706. 2008
    ..We conclude that PLG/SINCP-H is most efficacious when delivered intramuscularly but does not provide an advantage over standard DNA vaccines for protection against measles...
  31. ncbi request reprint Wounding: the primary mode of Seoul virus transmission among male Norway rats
    Ella R Hinson
    The W Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 70:310-7. 2004
    ..Because wounding, testosterone, and virus shedding are associated among males, aggression may be the primary mode of Seoul virus transmission among male, but not female, Norway rats...

Research Grants28

  1. IDO Regulation in the SIV Model of HIV CNS Disease
    M Christine Zink; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..We propose that IDO is responsible for HIV neurological disease and the depletion of serotonin. We will study this using a well-characterized SIV model of HIV infection. ..
  2. CHEMOKINES AND CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS IN SIV ENCEPHALITIS
    M Zink; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Finally behavioral/cognitive changes that correlate with establishment and replication of virus in the CNS and with neurodegenerative changes in the brain will be identified. ..
  3. Antiretroviral Therapy and SIV Encephalitis
    M Zink; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..2) To determine whether antiretroviral therapy that suppresses virus replication in the periphery modulates the selection and replication of neurovirulent viruses in the CNS of SIV-infected macaques. ..
  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Minocycline in Lentiviral Inf
    M Zink; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Theses mechanistic studies are important given the potential of minocycline to act not only as a neuroprotective agent but also as a viral suppressive agent in the CNS. ..
  5. EFFECTS OF COCAINE ON SIV AIDS & CNS DISEASE
    M Zink; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..g., as contrasted with opiates). ..
  6. HOST AND VIRAL FACTORS IN SIV PNEUMONIA
    M Zink; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..4) The cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors that are expressed in alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood-derived macrophages infected with different strains of virus will be identified. ..
  7. Minocycline Immune Effects on SIV CNS Disease
    M CHRISTINE contact ZINK; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Since minocycline is safe, inexpensive and off patent, the drug has the potential to provide significant amelioration of disease in resource-poor areas. ..