C B Ruff

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Ontogenetic changes in limb bone structural proportions in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 65:693-703. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21111, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 150:512-25. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Interpreting skeletal growth in the past from a functional and physiological perspective
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 150:29-37. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Stature and body mass estimation from skeletal remains in the European Holocene
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:601-17. 2012
  5. ncbi request reprint Femoral/humeral strength in early African Homo erectus
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 54:383-90. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Body mass prediction from stature and bi-iliac breadth in two high latitude populations, with application to earlier higher latitude humans
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:381-92. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Mechanical determinants of bone form: insights from skeletal remains
    C B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact 5:202-12. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Growth tracking of femoral and humeral strength from infancy through late adolescence
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Acta Paediatr 94:1030-7. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Body size prediction from juvenile skeletal remains
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 133:698-716. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Body size, body proportions, and mobility in the Tyrolean "Iceman"
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:91-101. 2006

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. ncbi request reprint Ontogenetic changes in limb bone structural proportions in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 65:693-703. 2013
    ..These findings indicate that both ontogenetically and among closely related species of Gorilla, long bone strength proportions better reflect actual locomotor behavior than bone length proportions. ..
  2. doi request reprint Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21111, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 150:512-25. 2013
    ..These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb...
  3. doi request reprint Interpreting skeletal growth in the past from a functional and physiological perspective
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 150:29-37. 2013
    ..Together such analyses can shed new light on both systemic and localized influences on bone growth, and the metabolic and mechanical factors underlying variation in growth...
  4. doi request reprint Stature and body mass estimation from skeletal remains in the European Holocene
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:601-17. 2012
    ..Thus, these equations should bebroadly applicable to European Holocene skeletal samples...
  5. ncbi request reprint Femoral/humeral strength in early African Homo erectus
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 54:383-90. 2008
    ..erectus and modern humans. Thus, by the earliest Pleistocene (1.7 Ma), completely modern patterns of bipedal behavior were fully established in at least one early hominin taxon...
  6. ncbi request reprint Body mass prediction from stature and bi-iliac breadth in two high latitude populations, with application to earlier higher latitude humans
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 48:381-92. 2005
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Mechanical determinants of bone form: insights from skeletal remains
    C B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact 5:202-12. 2005
    ..g., articulations versus diaphyses) and by age...
  8. ncbi request reprint Growth tracking of femoral and humeral strength from infancy through late adolescence
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Acta Paediatr 94:1030-7. 2005
    ..To determine to what degree femoral and humeral strengths "track", or remain at the same ranked position relative to other individuals during the entire growth period...
  9. ncbi request reprint Body size prediction from juvenile skeletal remains
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 133:698-716. 2007
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Body size, body proportions, and mobility in the Tyrolean "Iceman"
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:91-101. 2006
    ..There are indications that mobility in general declined between the European Mesolithic and late Neolithic, and that body size and shape may have become more variable throughout the continent following the Upper Paleolithic...
  11. doi request reprint Relative limb strength and locomotion in Homo habilis
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 138:90-100. 2009
    ..erectus was a completely committed terrestrial biped. This adds to the evidence that H. habilis (sensu stricto) and H. erectus represent ecologically distinct, parallel lineages during the early Pleistocene...
  12. ncbi request reprint Ontogenetic adaptation to bipedalism: age changes in femoral to humeral length and strength proportions in humans, with a comparison to baboons
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, 3rd Floor, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 45:317-49. 2003
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Growth in bone strength, body size, and muscle size in a juvenile longitudinal sample
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Bone 33:317-29. 2003
    ..Body size is the most important element in the weight-bearing lower limb skeleton, while both body size and muscle strength are important in the upper limb, especially in males...
  14. ncbi request reprint Long bone articular and diaphyseal structure in Old World monkeys and apes. II: Estimation of body mass
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 120:16-37. 2003
    ..The techniques are illustrated by estimating the body masses of four fossil anthropoid specimens of Proconsul nyanzae, Proconsul heseloni, Morotopithecus bishopi, and Theropithecus oswaldi...
  15. ncbi request reprint Long bone articular and diaphyseal structure in old world monkeys and apes. I: locomotor effects
    Christopher B Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 119:305-42. 2002
    ..Proportions of Proconsul nyanzae, Proconsul heseloni, Morotopithecus bishopi, and Theropithecus oswaldi are compared with modern distributions to illustrate the application of the techniques to fossil taxa...
  16. doi request reprint Body size and body shape in early hominins - implications of the Gona pelvis
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:166-78. 2010
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Body mass prediction from skeletal frame size in elite athletes
    C B Ruff
    Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 113:507-17. 2000
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Who's afraid of the big bad Wolff?: "Wolff's law" and bone functional adaptation
    Christopher Ruff
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 129:484-98. 2006
    ..Thus, when employed with appropriate caution, these features may be used to reconstruct mechanical loadings and behavioral differences within and between past populations...
  19. ncbi request reprint Stress fracture in military recruits: gender differences in muscle and bone susceptibility factors
    T J Beck
    Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 0849, USA
    Bone 27:437-44. 2000
    ..07). Unlike the bone geometry differences, thigh muscle cross-sectional areas were virtually identical to those of the men, suggesting that the muscles of the women were not relatively weaker...
  20. ncbi request reprint Body mass and encephalization in Pleistocene Homo
    C B Ruff
    Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Nature 387:173-6. 1997
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Experimental testing of a DEXA-derived curved beam model of the proximal femur
    T J Beck
    Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Orthop Res 16:394-8. 1998
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Cross-sectional morphology of the SK 82 and 97 proximal femora
    C B Ruff
    Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 109:509-21. 1999
    ..These features are consistent with both increased overall mechanical loading of the postcranial skeleton and a possibly slightly altered pattern of bipedal gait relative to that of H. erectus and modern humans...
  23. ncbi request reprint Structural adaptation to changing skeletal load in the progression toward hip fragility: the study of osteoporotic fractures
    T J Beck
    Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 16:1108-19. 2001
    ..The adaptive response to declining skeletal loads, with greater rates of subperiosteal expansion and cortical thinning, may increase fragility beyond that expected from the reduction in section modulus or bone mass alone...
  24. ncbi request reprint Body size, body shape, and long bone strength in modern humans
    C B Ruff
    Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 38:269-90. 2000
    ..In such cases a correction factor for body shape should be incorporated into any "size" standardization...
  25. ncbi request reprint Do mandibular cross-sectional properties and dental microwear give similar dietary signals?
    Jason M Organ
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 130:501-7. 2006
    ..These results suggest that dietary consistency significantly affects both mandibular structure and dental microwear, yet direct correlations between the two are complicated by a number of factors...
  26. ncbi request reprint Estimating human long bone cross-sectional geometric properties: a comparison of noninvasive methods
    Matthew C O'Neill
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E Monument St, 3rd Floor, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 47:221-35. 2004
    ..The EMM is a reasonable alternative, although the bias inherent in the method should be corrected if possible, especially when the results of the study are to be compared with data collected using different methods...
  27. doi request reprint Stature estimation in ancient Egyptians: a new technique based on anatomical reconstruction of stature
    Michelle H Raxter
    Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 136:147-55. 2008
    ..1%, tibial and radial estimates being the most biased. There is no evidence for significant variation in proportions among temporal or social groupings; thus, the new formulae may be broadly applicable to ancient Egyptian remains...
  28. doi request reprint Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores
    J Michael Plavcan
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 136:65-84. 2008
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Human body mass estimation: a comparison of "morphometric" and "mechanical" methods
    Benjamin M Auerbach
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 125:331-42. 2004
    ..Since the STBIB method was validated on other samples, and the FH methods produced similar estimates, this argues that either may be applied to skeletal remains with some confidence...
  30. ncbi request reprint Technical note: revised fully stature estimation technique
    Michelle H Raxter
    Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 133:817-8. 2007
  31. ncbi request reprint Limb bone bilateral asymmetry: variability and commonality among modern humans
    Benjamin M Auerbach
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 East Monument Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Hum Evol 50:203-18. 2006
    ..Industrial groups exhibit relatively less asymmetry than pre-industrial humans and less dimorphism in asymmetry. A mixture of influences from both genetic and behavioral factors is implicated as the source of these patterns...
  32. ncbi request reprint Age trends in femur stresses from a simulated fall on the hip among men and women: evidence of homeostatic adaptation underlying the decline in hip BMD
    Thomas J Beck
    Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 21:1425-32. 2006
    ..Expansion of femur outer diameter seems to counter net bone loss so that stresses remain similar across age groups, but stresses are higher in older women than in older men...
  33. pmc Body size, body proportions, and encephalization in a Middle Pleistocene archaic human from northern China
    Karen R Rosenberg
    Department of Anthropology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:3552-6. 2006
    ..Her encephalization quotient of 4.15 is similar to estimates for late Middle Pleistocene humans that are based on mean body size and mean brain size from unassociated specimens...
  34. pmc Differential susceptibility to hypertension is due to selection during the out-of-Africa expansion
    J Hunter Young
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Genet 1:e82. 2005
    ..This differential susceptibility is likely due to our history of adaptation to climate...
  35. ncbi request reprint Revision of the Fully technique for estimating statures
    Michelle H Raxter
    Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 130:374-84. 2006
    ..There is no effect of sex or ancestry on stature prediction. Resulting stature estimates are accurate to within 4.5 cm in 95% of the individuals in our sample, with no directional bias...