Amina Qutub

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A computational model of intracellular oxygen sensing by hypoxia-inducible factor HIF1 alpha
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 613 Traylor Bldg, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Cell Sci 119:3467-80. 2006
  2. pmc Three autocrine feedback loops determine HIF1 alpha expression in chronic hypoxia
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 613 Traylor Building, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1773:1511-25. 2007
  3. pmc Reactive oxygen species regulate hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha differentially in cancer and ischemia
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 613 Traylor Bldg, 720 Rutland Ave, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 28:5106-19. 2008
  4. pmc Multiscale models of angiogenesis
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    IEEE Eng Med Biol Mag 28:14-31. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Glucose transport to the brain: a systems model
    Amina A Qutub
    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, USA
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 49:595-617. 2005
  6. pmc Elongation, proliferation & migration differentiate endothelial cell phenotypes and determine capillary sprouting
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    BMC Syst Biol 3:13. 2009

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. pmc A computational model of intracellular oxygen sensing by hypoxia-inducible factor HIF1 alpha
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 613 Traylor Bldg, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Cell Sci 119:3467-80. 2006
    ..The model advances quantitative molecular level understanding of HIF1 pathways--an endeavor that will help elucidate the diverse responses to hypoxia found in cancer, ischemia and exercise...
  2. pmc Three autocrine feedback loops determine HIF1 alpha expression in chronic hypoxia
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 613 Traylor Building, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1773:1511-25. 2007
    ..The model provides quantitative insight critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms underlying a cell's response to long-term hypoxia...
  3. pmc Reactive oxygen species regulate hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha differentially in cancer and ischemia
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 613 Traylor Bldg, 720 Rutland Ave, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 28:5106-19. 2008
    ....
  4. pmc Multiscale models of angiogenesis
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    IEEE Eng Med Biol Mag 28:14-31. 2009
    ..As bioengineers, we approach angiogenesis as a complex, interconnected system of events occurring in sequence and in parallel, on multiple levels, triggered by a main stimulus, e.g., hypoxia...
  5. ncbi request reprint Glucose transport to the brain: a systems model
    Amina A Qutub
    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, USA
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 49:595-617. 2005
    ..A developing complex systems simulation is introduced, initiating a single platform to represent the dynamics of glucose transport across the adapting human blood-brain barrier...
  6. pmc Elongation, proliferation & migration differentiate endothelial cell phenotypes and determine capillary sprouting
    Amina A Qutub
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    BMC Syst Biol 3:13. 2009
    ..model that bridges the gap between these two perspectives, and addresses a remaining question in angiogenic sprouting: how do the processes of endothelial cell elongation, migration and proliferation contribute to vessel formation?..