Roger D Peng

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Reproducible research in computational science
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Science 334:1226-7. 2011
  2. ncbi request reprint Seasonal analyses of air pollution and mortality in 100 US cities
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 6125 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 161:585-94. 2005
  3. pmc Spatial misalignment in time series studies of air pollution and health data
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biostatistics 11:720-40. 2010
  4. pmc Emergency admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and the chemical composition of fine particle air pollution
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 117:957-63. 2009
  5. pmc Toward a quantitative estimate of future heat wave mortality under global climate change
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 119:701-6. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Reproducible epidemiologic research
    Roger D Peng
    Biostatistics Department, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street E3535, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 163:783-9. 2006
  7. pmc In-home air pollution is linked to respiratory morbidity in former smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    Nadia N Hansel
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 187:1085-90. 2013
  8. pmc Short-term exposure to particulate matter constituents and mortality in a national study of U.S. urban communities
    Jenna R Krall
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1148-53. 2013
  9. pmc Being overweight increases susceptibility to indoor pollutants among urban children with asthma
    Kim D Lu
    Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 131:1017-23, 1023.e1-3. 2013
  10. ncbi request reprint Particulate air pollution and mortality in the United States: did the risks change from 1987 to 2000?
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 166:880-8. 2007

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. pmc Reproducible research in computational science
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Science 334:1226-7. 2011
    ..Reproducibility has the potential to serve as a minimum standard for judging scientific claims when full independent replication of a study is not possible...
  2. ncbi request reprint Seasonal analyses of air pollution and mortality in 100 US cities
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 6125 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 161:585-94. 2005
    ..These results provide useful information for understanding particle toxicity and guiding future analyses of particle constituent data...
  3. pmc Spatial misalignment in time series studies of air pollution and health data
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biostatistics 11:720-40. 2010
    ..We apply our methods to a database containing information on hospital admissions, air pollution, and weather for 20 large urban counties in the United States...
  4. pmc Emergency admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and the chemical composition of fine particle air pollution
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 117:957-63. 2009
    ..5) (particulate matter <or= 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) as the indicator. Evidence regarding the toxicity of the chemical components of the PM(2.5) mixture is limited...
  5. pmc Toward a quantitative estimate of future heat wave mortality under global climate change
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 119:701-6. 2011
    ..The extent to which climate change will harm human health through changes in the distribution of heat waves and the sources of uncertainty in estimating these effects have not been studied extensively...
  6. ncbi request reprint Reproducible epidemiologic research
    Roger D Peng
    Biostatistics Department, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street E3535, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 163:783-9. 2006
    ..They also propose methods for reproducible research and implement them by use of a case study in air pollution and health...
  7. pmc In-home air pollution is linked to respiratory morbidity in former smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    Nadia N Hansel
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 187:1085-90. 2013
    ..The effect of indoor air pollutants on respiratory morbidity among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in developed countries is uncertain...
  8. pmc Short-term exposure to particulate matter constituents and mortality in a national study of U.S. urban communities
    Jenna R Krall
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1148-53. 2013
    ..We hypothesized that associations between PM2.5 constituents and mortality would not vary spatially or seasonally if variation in chemical composition contributes to variation in estimated PM2.5 mortality effects...
  9. pmc Being overweight increases susceptibility to indoor pollutants among urban children with asthma
    Kim D Lu
    Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 131:1017-23, 1023.e1-3. 2013
    ..Whether being overweight is a risk factor for the effects of indoor pollutant exposure on asthma health is unknown...
  10. ncbi request reprint Particulate air pollution and mortality in the United States: did the risks change from 1987 to 2000?
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 166:880-8. 2007
    ..The methodology presented can be used to track the health effects of air pollution routinely on regional and national scales...
  11. pmc Coarse particulate matter air pollution and hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases among Medicare patients
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    JAMA 299:2172-9. 2008
    ..5) have been studied extensively over the last decade. Evidence concerning the health risks of the coarse fraction of greater than 2.5 microm and 10 microm or less in aerodynamic diameter (PM10-2.5) is limited...
  12. pmc Fine particulate air pollution and hospital admission for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    JAMA 295:1127-34. 2006
    ..5 microm in aerodynamic diameter [PM2.5]) is limited. Results from the new national monitoring network for PM2.5 make possible systematic research on health risks at national and regional scales...
  13. pmc Heat-related emergency hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in the Medicare population
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 187:1098-103. 2013
    ..With climate change predictions of more frequent and more intense heat waves, it is of paramount importance to quantify the health risks related to heat, especially for the most vulnerable...
  14. pmc A Bayesian model averaging approach for estimating the relative risk of mortality associated with heat waves in 105 U.S. cities
    Jennifer F Bobb
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Biometrics 67:1605-16. 2011
    ....
  15. doi request reprint Predicting future asthma morbidity in preschool inner-city children
    Nadia N Hansel
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Asthma 48:797-803. 2011
    ..The purpose of our study was to determine which clinical and environmental factors are predictive of poor long-term asthma control in preschool inner-city children...
  16. pmc Is the relation between ozone and mortality confounded by chemical components of particulate matter? Analysis of 7 components in 57 US communities
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 176:726-32. 2012
    ..Previous research found that the ozone-mortality relation is not confounded by particulate matter measured by mass; this national study indicates that the relation is also robust to control for specific components of PM(2.5)...
  17. pmc Does the effect of PM10 on mortality depend on PM nickel and vanadium content? A reanalysis of the NMMAPS data
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21215, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 115:1701-3. 2007
    ..They found that average concentrations of nickel or vanadium in PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm) positively modified the lag-1 day association between PM10 and all-cause mortality...
  18. pmc Protecting human health from air pollution: shifting from a single-pollutant to a multipollutant approach
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Epidemiology 21:187-94. 2010
    ..Although there is general agreement that multipollutant approaches are desirable, the challenges of implementing them are vast...
  19. pmc Methods to calculate the heat index as an exposure metric in environmental health research
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1111-9. 2013
    ..However, the method of calculating heat index varies across environmental studies, which could mean that studies using different algorithms to calculate heat index may not be comparable...
  20. pmc Temporal trends and racial/ethnic disparity in self-reported pediatric food allergy in the United States
    Corinne A Keet
    Division of Allergy and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland Electronic address
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 112:222-229.e3. 2014
    ..The prevalence of food allergy is thought to be increasing, but data from the United States have not been systematically synthesized...
  21. ncbi request reprint Assessment of heterogeneity of metal composition of fine particulate matter collected from eight U.S. counties using principal component analysis
    Inkyu Han
    Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Air Waste Manag Assoc 62:773-82. 2012
    ..These differences will be helpful for epidemiological and toxicological studies to help explain why health risks associated with PM exposure are different in locations with similar mass concentrations of PM...
  22. pmc Both the variability and level of mouse allergen exposure influence the phenotype of the immune response in workers at a mouse facility
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 128:390-396.e7. 2011
    ..The role of natural aeroallergen exposure in modulating allergen-specific immune responses is not well understood...
  23. pmc Associations between serum folate and vitamin D levels and incident mouse sensitization in adults
    Corinne A Keet
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md Electronic address
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 133:399-404. 2014
    ..Although both folic acid intake and vitamin D levels are hypothesized to be contributors to the increased incidence of allergic diseases, prospective studies of these relationships have not been done in adults...
  24. doi request reprint The natural history of persistent peanut allergy
    Dara L Neuman-Sunshine
    Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 North Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 108:326-331.e3. 2012
    ..Peanut allergy affects 1% of children, and for those with persistent disease, few data have been published on trends in peanut-specific immunoglobulin E (P-IgE) levels or the value of P-IgE in predicting reaction severity...
  25. ncbi request reprint On time series analysis of public health and biomedical data
    Scott L Zeger
    Department of Biostatistics, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Annu Rev Public Health 27:57-79. 2006
    ..S. cities on concentrations of particulate air pollution. Time series methods are necessary to make valid inferences from data by accounting for the correlation among repeated responses over time...
  26. ncbi request reprint Variation in echocardiographic and cardiac hemodynamic effects of PM and ozone inhalation exposure in strains related to Nppa and Npr1 gene knock-out mice
    Clarke G Tankersley
    Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 22:695-707. 2010
    ..These results suggest that PM and O3 exposures, alone and combined, lead to different cardiac functional changes, and these unique changes are age-specific and dependent on Nppa and Npr1 genes...
  27. pmc Heat-related mortality and adaptation to heat in the United States
    Jennifer F Bobb
    Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 122:811-6. 2014
    ..These impacts could be mitigated if individuals and communities adapt to changing exposures; however, little is known about the extent to which the population may be adapting...
  28. pmc Indoor particulate matter increases asthma morbidity in children with non-atopic and atopic asthma
    Meredith C McCormack
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 106:308-15. 2011
    ..Compared with atopic asthma, fewer environmental modifications are recommended for non-atopic asthma in children...
  29. pmc The exposure-response curve for ozone and risk of mortality and the adequacy of current ozone regulations
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 205 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 114:532-6. 2006
    ..Interventions to further reduce O3 pollution would benefit public health, even in regions that meet current regulatory standards and guidelines...