I McIntosh

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Fine mapping of the nail-patella syndrome locus at 9q34
    I McIntosh
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 4922, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 60:133-42. 1997
  2. pmc Mutation analysis of LMX1B gene in nail-patella syndrome patients
    I McIntosh
    Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 63:1651-8. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Analysis of candidate genes on chromosome 2 in oral cleft case-parent trios from three populations
    T H Beaty
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Hum Genet 120:501-18. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Testing for interaction between maternal smoking and TGFA genotype among oral cleft cases born in Maryland 1992-1996
    T H Beaty
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Cleft Palate Craniofac J 34:447-54. 1997
  5. pmc Multiple molecular mechanisms underlying subdiagnostic variants of Marfan syndrome
    R A Montgomery
    Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 63:1703-11. 1998
  6. ncbi request reprint Deletion of a branch-point consensus sequence in the LMX1B gene causes exon skipping in a family with nail patella syndrome
    J D Hamlington
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 21287 4922, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 8:311-4. 2000
  7. ncbi request reprint Four novel FBN1 mutations: significance for mutant transcript level and EGF-like domain calcium binding in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome
    H C Dietz
    Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205
    Genomics 17:468-75. 1993
  8. ncbi request reprint A case-control study of nonsyndromic oral clefts in Maryland
    T H Beaty
    The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Ann Epidemiol 11:434-42. 2001
  9. pmc High throughput SNP and expression analyses of candidate genes for non-syndromic oral clefts
    J W Park
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Med Genet 43:598-608. 2006
  10. pmc Achondroplasia is defined by recurrent G380R mutations of FGFR3
    G A Bellus
    Center for Medical Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore
    Am J Hum Genet 56:368-73. 1995

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. pmc Fine mapping of the nail-patella syndrome locus at 9q34
    I McIntosh
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 4922, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 60:133-42. 1997
    ..0; theta = .00) and D9S315 (LOD = 22.0; theta = .00). Informative recombination events place the NPS locus within a 1-2-cM interval between D9S60 and the adenylate kinase gene (AK1)...
  2. pmc Mutation analysis of LMX1B gene in nail-patella syndrome patients
    I McIntosh
    Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 63:1651-8. 1998
    ..The nature of the mutations supports the hypothesis that NPS is the result of haploinsufficiency for LMX1B. There was no evidence of correlation between aspects of the NPS phenotype and specific mutations...
  3. ncbi request reprint Analysis of candidate genes on chromosome 2 in oral cleft case-parent trios from three populations
    T H Beaty
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Hum Genet 120:501-18. 2006
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Testing for interaction between maternal smoking and TGFA genotype among oral cleft cases born in Maryland 1992-1996
    T H Beaty
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Cleft Palate Craniofac J 34:447-54. 1997
    ....
  5. pmc Multiple molecular mechanisms underlying subdiagnostic variants of Marfan syndrome
    R A Montgomery
    Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 63:1703-11. 1998
    ..These data have immediate relevance for the diagnostic and prognostic counseling of patients and their family members...
  6. ncbi request reprint Deletion of a branch-point consensus sequence in the LMX1B gene causes exon skipping in a family with nail patella syndrome
    J D Hamlington
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 21287 4922, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 8:311-4. 2000
    ..RNA analysis demonstrated that deletion of the branchpoint sequence resulted in skipping of the downstream exon. A mechanism to explain this phenomenon is presented...
  7. ncbi request reprint Four novel FBN1 mutations: significance for mutant transcript level and EGF-like domain calcium binding in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome
    H C Dietz
    Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205
    Genomics 17:468-75. 1993
    ..These data support a role for altered calcium binding to EGF-like domains in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome and suggest a dominant negative mechanism for the pathogenesis of this disorder...
  8. ncbi request reprint A case-control study of nonsyndromic oral clefts in Maryland
    T H Beaty
    The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Ann Epidemiol 11:434-42. 2001
    ..MSX1 showed evidence of linkage disequilibrium in both case-control and case-parent trio analysis...
  9. pmc High throughput SNP and expression analyses of candidate genes for non-syndromic oral clefts
    J W Park
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Med Genet 43:598-608. 2006
    ..Advances in high-throughput genotyping technology now make it possible to test multiple markers in many candidate genes simultaneously...
  10. pmc Achondroplasia is defined by recurrent G380R mutations of FGFR3
    G A Bellus
    Center for Medical Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore
    Am J Hum Genet 56:368-73. 1995
    ..The homogeneity of mutations in achondroplasia is unprecedented for an autosomal dominant disorder and may explain the relative lack of heterogeneity in the achondroplasia phenotype...
  11. ncbi request reprint Restricted distribution of loss-of-function mutations within the LMX1B genes of nail-patella syndrome patients
    M V Clough
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 4922, USA
    Hum Mutat 14:459-65. 1999
    ..These findings support the hypothesis that NPS results from a 50% reduction in LMX1B function via a reduction in synthesis, disruption of secondary structure, or failure to bind DNA...
  12. ncbi request reprint Localization of the achondroplasia gene to the distal 2.5 Mb of human chromosome 4p
    C A Francomano
    Center for Medical Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287
    Hum Mol Genet 3:787-92. 1994
    ..The establishment of closely linked markers will facilitate positional cloning of the achondroplasia gene and permit prenatal diagnosis of homozygous achondroplasia for at risk couples...
  13. ncbi request reprint Evidence for an association between markers on chromosome 19q and non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in two groups of multiplex families
    D F Wyszynski
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Hum Genet 99:22-6. 1997
    ..001) and for allele 13 of the D19S178 marker in the Mexican data set (P = 0.004). These results support an association, possibly due to linkage disequilibrium, between chromosome 19 markers and a putative NSCL/P locus...
  14. ncbi request reprint Phenotype severity and genetic variation at the disease locus: an investigation of nail dysplasia in the nail patella syndrome
    J A Dunston
    Predoctoral Program in Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Ann Hum Genet 69:1-8. 2005
    ..Since there is no evidence that particular mutations, or classes of mutation, are associated with the variation (p > 0.5), further work is required to identify the elements associated with the LMX1B gene that mediate phenotypic severity...
  15. ncbi request reprint Additional mutations of type X collagen confirm COL10A1 as the Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia locus
    I McIntosh
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287
    Hum Mol Genet 3:303-7. 1994
    ..All three mutations are in the carboxy-terminal non-collagenous domain suggesting that the effect of these mutations is to impair the mutant polypeptide's ability to participate in chain association and trimer formation...
  16. ncbi request reprint Mutation in fibrillin-1 and the Marfanoid-craniosynostosis (Shprintzen-Goldberg) syndrome
    S Sood
    Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Nat Genet 12:209-11. 1996
    ..Our recent observation that FBN1 transcript is expressed as early as the 8-cell stage of human embryogenesis is consistent with this hypothesis...
  17. ncbi request reprint Twenty-two novel LMX1B mutations identified in nail patella syndrome (NPS) patients
    J D Hamlington
    Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Hum Mutat 18:458. 2001
    ..The type and distribution of the mutations is consistent with the hypothesis that NPS is the result of haploinsufficiency for LMX1B...
  18. pmc Haplotype diversity in 11 candidate genes across four populations
    T H Beaty
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Genetics 171:259-67. 2005
    ..Such haplotype diversity has implications for designing studies of association involving samples from genetically distinct populations...
  19. ncbi request reprint Concentration of mutations causing Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia in the C-terminal noncollagenous domain of type X collagen
    I McIntosh
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    Hum Mutat 5:121-5. 1995
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint A recurrent mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 causes hypochondroplasia
    G A Bellus
    Center for Medical Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    Nat Genet 10:357-9. 1995
    ..This mutation causes a C to A transversion at nucleotide 1620, resulting in an Asn540Lys substitution in the proximal tyrosine kinase domain...
  21. ncbi request reprint Testing candidate genes for non-syndromic oral clefts using a case-parent trio design
    Terri H Beaty
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Genet Epidemiol 22:1-11. 2002
    ..03). Using a conditional logistic model to test for gene-gene interaction showed no evidence of interaction between TGFbeta3 and MSX1, with both seeming to contribute independently to risk of isolated, non-syndromic oral clefts...
  22. pmc Identification of TSIX, encoding an RNA antisense to human XIST, reveals differences from its murine counterpart: implications for X inactivation
    B R Migeon
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 69:951-60. 2001
    ..These differences could explain the fact that X inactivation is not imprinted in human placenta, and they raise questions about the role of TSIX in random X inactivation...
  23. ncbi request reprint Nail patella syndrome revisited: 50 years after linkage
    I McIntosh
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway BRB 407, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Ann Hum Genet 69:349-63. 2005
    ....
  24. pmc Fifteen novel FBN1 mutations causing Marfan syndrome detected by heteroduplex analysis of genomic amplicons
    G Nijbroek
    Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 57:8-21. 1995
    ....