Igal Madar

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Assessment of severity of coronary artery stenosis in a canine model using the PET agent 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium: comparison with 99mTc-tetrofosmin
    Igal Madar
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:1021-30. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Characterization of uptake of the new PET imaging compound 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium in dog myocardium
    Igal Madar
    Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:1359-66. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Imaging delta- and mu-opioid receptors by PET in lung carcinoma patients
    Igal Madar
    Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:207-13. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Characterization of membrane potential-dependent uptake of the novel PET tracer 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenylphosphonium cation
    Igal Madar
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 601 N Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 34:2057-65. 2007
  5. doi request reprint Detection and quantification of the evolution dynamics of apoptosis using the PET voltage sensor 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium
    Igal Madar
    Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:774-80. 2009
  6. doi request reprint 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium: a noninvasive sensor of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis
    Igal Madar
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 52:808-14. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Quantification of brain mu-opioid receptors with [11C]carfentanil: reference-tissue methods
    Christopher J Endres
    Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Nucl Med Biol 30:177-86. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint PET imaging of opioid receptors in pain: progress and new directions
    Hayden T Ravert
    Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Curr Pharm Des 10:759-68. 2004
  9. doi request reprint Stable delineation of the ischemic area by the PET perfusion tracer 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium after transient coronary occlusion
    Takahiro Higuchi
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 52:965-9. 2011
  10. doi request reprint Compensation for spill-in and spill-out partial volume effects in cardiac PET imaging
    Yong Du
    The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 601 N Caroline St, JHOC 4263, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Nucl Cardiol 20:84-98. 2013

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. ncbi request reprint Assessment of severity of coronary artery stenosis in a canine model using the PET agent 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium: comparison with 99mTc-tetrofosmin
    Igal Madar
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:1021-30. 2007
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Characterization of uptake of the new PET imaging compound 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium in dog myocardium
    Igal Madar
    Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:1359-66. 2006
    ..Here, we characterize the 18F-FBnTP uptake and retention kinetics, in vitro and in vivo, as well as the myocardial and whole-body biodistribution in healthy dogs, using PET...
  3. ncbi request reprint Imaging delta- and mu-opioid receptors by PET in lung carcinoma patients
    Igal Madar
    Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:207-13. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Characterization of membrane potential-dependent uptake of the novel PET tracer 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenylphosphonium cation
    Igal Madar
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 601 N Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 34:2057-65. 2007
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Detection and quantification of the evolution dynamics of apoptosis using the PET voltage sensor 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium
    Igal Madar
    Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:774-80. 2009
    ..Here, we have characterized the ability of the novel PET voltage sensor (18)F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium ((18)F-FBnTP) to quantify the time-dependent apoptotic action of the taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel in vitro and in vivo...
  6. doi request reprint 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium: a noninvasive sensor of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis
    Igal Madar
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 52:808-14. 2011
    ..We investigated an approach to detect BAT depots and monitor thermogenesis using the mitochondria-targeting voltage sensor radiolabeled fluorobenzyltriphenyl phosphonium (FBnTP)...
  7. ncbi request reprint Quantification of brain mu-opioid receptors with [11C]carfentanil: reference-tissue methods
    Christopher J Endres
    Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Nucl Med Biol 30:177-86. 2003
    ..It was determined that both a graphical method, and a simplified reference tissue model, were more accurate than the tissue-ratio method for quantification of CFN binding...
  8. ncbi request reprint PET imaging of opioid receptors in pain: progress and new directions
    Hayden T Ravert
    Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Curr Pharm Des 10:759-68. 2004
    ..The implication of this approach to the study of pain and pain syndromes, and possible clinical applications, is also addressed...
  9. doi request reprint Stable delineation of the ischemic area by the PET perfusion tracer 18F-fluorobenzyl triphenyl phosphonium after transient coronary occlusion
    Takahiro Higuchi
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Nucl Med 52:965-9. 2011
    ..We used a rat model of transient coronary occlusion to determine the stability of the perfusion defect size over time and the magnitude of redistribution...
  10. doi request reprint Compensation for spill-in and spill-out partial volume effects in cardiac PET imaging
    Yong Du
    The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 601 N Caroline St, JHOC 4263, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Nucl Cardiol 20:84-98. 2013
    ..It is important to compensate for both effects to achieve accurate quantification. In this study, an image-based partial volume compensation (PVC) method was developed and validated for cardiac PET...
  11. ncbi request reprint Preferential accumulation of (3)H-tetraphenylphosphonium in non-small cell lung carcinoma in mice: comparison with (99m)Tc-MIBI
    Igal Madar
    Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
    J Nucl Med 43:234-8. 2002
    ..Here, we extend our studies of phosphonium cations to nonbrain tumors and characterize the biodistribution and tumor specificity of (3)H-tetraphenylphosphonium ((3)H-TPP) in non-small cell lung carcinoma in mice...