Jorn Diedrichsen

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Detecting and adjusting for artifacts in fMRI time series data
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Laboratory for Computational Motor Control, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, 720 Rutland Ave, 416 Traylor Building, MD 21205 2195, USA
    Neuroimage 27:624-34. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Cerebellar involvement in anticipating the consequences of self-produced actions during bimanual movements
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 720 Rutland Ave, 416 Traylor Bldg, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neurophysiol 93:801-12. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Immediate spatial distortions of pointing movements induced by visual landmarks
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
    Percept Psychophys 66:89-103. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Independent on-line control of the two hands during bimanual reaching
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, USA
    Eur J Neurosci 19:1643-52. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint The role of the corpus callosum in the coupling of bimanual isometric force pulses
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 5800, USA
    J Neurophysiol 90:2409-18. 2003
  6. pmc Neural correlates of reach errors
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurosci 25:9919-31. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Goal-selection and movement-related conflict during bimanual reaching movements
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Cereb Cortex 16:1729-38. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Sensory prediction errors drive cerebellum-dependent adaptation of reaching
    Ya weng Tseng
    Dept of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neurophysiol 98:54-62. 2007
  9. pmc Reach adaptation: what determines whether we learn an internal model of the tool or adapt the model of our arm?
    Joann Kluzik
    Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:1455-64. 2008
  10. pmc Why does the brain predict sensory consequences of oculomotor commands? Optimal integration of the predicted and the actual sensory feedback
    Siavash Vaziri
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurosci 26:4188-97. 2006

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. pmc Detecting and adjusting for artifacts in fMRI time series data
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Laboratory for Computational Motor Control, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, 720 Rutland Ave, 416 Traylor Building, MD 21205 2195, USA
    Neuroimage 27:624-34. 2005
    ..The new method may be particularly useful for studies that involve special populations (e.g., children or elderly) where sporadic, artifact-generating events are more likely...
  2. ncbi request reprint Cerebellar involvement in anticipating the consequences of self-produced actions during bimanual movements
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 720 Rutland Ave, 416 Traylor Bldg, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neurophysiol 93:801-12. 2005
    ..Furthermore, this structure appears to be essential for the accurate timing of previously learned behaviors. The patients with cerebellar damage showed poorly timed adjustments with the APA beginning earlier than in healthy participants...
  3. ncbi request reprint Immediate spatial distortions of pointing movements induced by visual landmarks
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
    Percept Psychophys 66:89-103. 2004
    ..We argue that even early memory representations for pointing movements are influenced by visual information in the surrounding visual field...
  4. ncbi request reprint Independent on-line control of the two hands during bimanual reaching
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, USA
    Eur J Neurosci 19:1643-52. 2004
    ..The subtle interference observed between the arms reflects interactions between target-related representations in visual coordinates rather than between movement-related representations in joint- or muscle-coordinates...
  5. ncbi request reprint The role of the corpus callosum in the coupling of bimanual isometric force pulses
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 5800, USA
    J Neurophysiol 90:2409-18. 2003
    ..These results are congruent with the hypothesis that interference related to response selection and planning of bimanual force pulses arises from callosal interactions...
  6. pmc Neural correlates of reach errors
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurosci 25:9919-31. 2005
    ..These findings indicate a neural and behavioral dissociation between errors that lead to switching of behavioral goals and errors that lead to adaptation of internal models of limb dynamics and kinematics...
  7. ncbi request reprint Goal-selection and movement-related conflict during bimanual reaching movements
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Cereb Cortex 16:1729-38. 2006
    ..These results suggest distinct neural loci for 2 forms of constraint on our ability to perform bimanual reaching movements...
  8. ncbi request reprint Sensory prediction errors drive cerebellum-dependent adaptation of reaching
    Ya weng Tseng
    Dept of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neurophysiol 98:54-62. 2007
    ..Therefore adaptation to visuomotor perturbations depends on the cerebellum and is driven by the mismatch between predicted and actual sensory outcome of motor commands...
  9. pmc Reach adaptation: what determines whether we learn an internal model of the tool or adapt the model of our arm?
    Joann Kluzik
    Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:1455-64. 2008
    ..Gradual changes in the tool's dynamics increased the extent to which the nervous system recalibrated the model of the subject's own arm...
  10. pmc Why does the brain predict sensory consequences of oculomotor commands? Optimal integration of the predicted and the actual sensory feedback
    Siavash Vaziri
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurosci 26:4188-97. 2006
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Ipsilateral motor cortex activity during unimanual hand movements relates to task complexity
    Timothy Verstynen
    Deptartment of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    J Neurophysiol 93:1209-22. 2005
    ..These findings indicate a prominent role of left hemisphere in the execution of complex movements independent of the sequential nature of the task...
  12. ncbi request reprint Comparing continuous and discrete movements with fMRI
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 978:509-10. 2002
  13. doi request reprint Encoding of sensory prediction errors in the human cerebellum
    John Schlerf
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurosci 32:4913-22. 2012
    ..This effect was similar for the two error types. The results provide evidence for the encoding of errors resulting from either the unexpected presence or unexpected absence of sensory stimulation in the human cerebellum...
  14. ncbi request reprint Disrupted timing of discontinuous but not continuous movements by cerebellar lesions
    Rebecca M C Spencer
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, 3210 Tolman Hall 1650, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Science 300:1437-9. 2003
    ..The requirement for explicit temporal representation provides a parsimonious account of cerebellar involvement in a range of tasks...
  15. ncbi request reprint Bimanual interference associated with the selection of target locations
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, 94720 1650, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 29:64-77. 2003
    ..Interference observed during bimanual reaching appears to reflect difficulty in segregating the response rules assigned to each hand...
  16. pmc Active learning: learning a motor skill without a coach
    Vincent S Huang
    Laboratory for Computational Motor Control, Department of Biomedical Engineering, John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:879-87. 2008
    ..While we show that these algorithms do not provide an adequate description of human behavior, our results suggest ways to improve human motor learning by helping people choose an optimal training sequence...
  17. pmc Transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex affects decisions of hand choice
    Flavio T P Oliveira
    Department of Psychology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:17751-6. 2010
    ..These results are unique in providing causal evidence that the posterior parietal cortex is involved in decisions of hand choice...
  18. ncbi request reprint Anticipatory adjustments in the unloading task: is an efference copy necessary for learning?
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Exp Brain Res 148:272-6. 2003
    ..These results indicate that a voluntary action is necessary to acquire an anticipatory adjustment in the unloading task...
  19. pmc Dissociating timing and coordination as functions of the cerebellum
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Laboratory for Computational Motor Control, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    J Neurosci 27:6291-301. 2007
    ..g., the arm) to coordinate actions of another effector (the thumb)...
  20. ncbi request reprint The cerebellum and event timing
    Richard B Ivry
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 978:302-17. 2002
    ..While the cerebellum likely contributes to performance of a wide range of skilled behaviors, it appears to be especially important when the tasks entail event timing...
  21. ncbi request reprint A spatially unbiased atlas template of the human cerebellum
    Jorn Diedrichsen
    Laboratory for Computational Motor Control, Department for Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Neuroimage 33:127-38. 2006
    ..C. (2002a) Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 978:468-479.) atlas of one individual, the "colin27"-brain...
  22. ncbi request reprint Dissociating task-set selection from task-set inhibition in the prefrontal cortex
    Ulrich Mayr
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 18:14-21. 2006
    ..Although left frontal patients showed normal inhibition, right frontal patients showed no evidence for inhibition. These results suggest a neurocognitive dissociation between task-set selection and inhibition...
  23. ncbi request reprint Callosotomy patients exhibit temporal uncoupling during continuous bimanual movements
    Steven W Kennerley
    University of California, Berkeley, 3210 Tolman Hall 1650, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
    Nat Neurosci 5:376-81. 2002
    ..We propose a subcortical locus of temporal coupling for movements involving discrete events. In contrast, synchronization between the hands during continuous movements depends on interhemispheric transmission across the corpus callosum...