Richard A Cone

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Microbicide excipients can greatly increase susceptibility to genital herpes transmission in the mouse
    Thomas R Moench
    ReProtect, Inc, Baltimore, MD 21286 USA
    BMC Infect Dis 10:331. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Barrier properties of mucus
    Richard A Cone
    Biophysics Department, Johns Hopkins University, and ReProtect, Inc, Baltimore MD, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:75-85. 2009
  3. pmc Vaginal microbicides: detecting toxicities in vivo that paradoxically increase pathogen transmission
    Richard A Cone
    Mucosal Protection Laboratory, Dept of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 6:90. 2006
  4. pmc Low pH immobilizes and kills human leukocytes and prevents transmission of cell-associated HIV in a mouse model
    Stuart S Olmsted
    Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 5:79. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Human monoclonal antibody stability and activity at vaginal pH
    Philip E Castle
    Thomas C Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Reprod Immunol 56:61-76. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Microbicide efficacy and toxicity tests in a mouse model for vaginal transmission of Chlamydia trachomatis
    Sharon L Achilles
    The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 29:655-64. 2002
  7. doi request reprint Novel approaches to vaginal delivery and safety of microbicides: biopharmaceuticals, nanoparticles, and vaccines
    Kevin J Whaley
    Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Inc, San Diego, CA 92121, USA
    Antiviral Res 88:S55-66. 2010
  8. pmc Nanoparticle diffusion in, and microrheology of, the bovine vitreous ex vivo
    Qingguo Xu
    Department of Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Eye Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
    J Control Release 167:76-84. 2013
  9. pmc Cervicovaginal fluid and semen block the microbicidal activity of hydrogen peroxide produced by vaginal lactobacilli
    Deirdre E O'Hanlon
    Mucosal Protection Laboratory, Thomas C, Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 10:120. 2010
  10. pmc In vaginal fluid, bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis can be suppressed with lactic acid but not hydrogen peroxide
    Deirdre E O'Hanlon
    Mucosal Protection Laboratory, Thomas C Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 11:200. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. pmc Microbicide excipients can greatly increase susceptibility to genital herpes transmission in the mouse
    Thomas R Moench
    ReProtect, Inc, Baltimore, MD 21286 USA
    BMC Infect Dis 10:331. 2010
    ..However, excipients have not previously been tested in susceptibility models...
  2. doi request reprint Barrier properties of mucus
    Richard A Cone
    Biophysics Department, Johns Hopkins University, and ReProtect, Inc, Baltimore MD, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:75-85. 2009
    ..These viruses are smaller than the mucus mesh spacing, and have surfaces that do not stick to mucus. They form a useful model for developing NP for mucosal drug delivery...
  3. pmc Vaginal microbicides: detecting toxicities in vivo that paradoxically increase pathogen transmission
    Richard A Cone
    Mucosal Protection Laboratory, Dept of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 6:90. 2006
    ....
  4. pmc Low pH immobilizes and kills human leukocytes and prevents transmission of cell-associated HIV in a mouse model
    Stuart S Olmsted
    Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 5:79. 2005
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Human monoclonal antibody stability and activity at vaginal pH
    Philip E Castle
    Thomas C Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Reprod Immunol 56:61-76. 2002
    ..Taken together, our data and empirical calculations suggest that vaginally applied human MAbs are likely to remain stable and active throughout the duration they are likely to reside in the vagina...
  6. ncbi request reprint Microbicide efficacy and toxicity tests in a mouse model for vaginal transmission of Chlamydia trachomatis
    Sharon L Achilles
    The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 29:655-64. 2002
    ..Microbicides are being developed for woman-controlled protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)...
  7. doi request reprint Novel approaches to vaginal delivery and safety of microbicides: biopharmaceuticals, nanoparticles, and vaccines
    Kevin J Whaley
    Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Inc, San Diego, CA 92121, USA
    Antiviral Res 88:S55-66. 2010
    ..This article forms part of a special supplement covering several presentations on novel microbicide formulations from the symposium on "Recent Trends in Microbicide Formulations" held on 25 and 26 January 2010, Arlington, VA...
  8. pmc Nanoparticle diffusion in, and microrheology of, the bovine vitreous ex vivo
    Qingguo Xu
    Department of Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Eye Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
    J Control Release 167:76-84. 2013
    ..These findings will help guide the development of nanoparticle-based therapeutics for the treatment of vision-threatening ocular diseases...
  9. pmc Cervicovaginal fluid and semen block the microbicidal activity of hydrogen peroxide produced by vaginal lactobacilli
    Deirdre E O'Hanlon
    Mucosal Protection Laboratory, Thomas C, Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 10:120. 2010
    ..However, cervicovaginal fluid (CVF) and semen have significant H2O2-blocking activity...
  10. pmc In vaginal fluid, bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis can be suppressed with lactic acid but not hydrogen peroxide
    Deirdre E O'Hanlon
    Mucosal Protection Laboratory, Thomas C Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 11:200. 2011
    ..Here we used conditions more like those in vivo to compare the effects of physiologically plausible concentrations of H2O2 and lactic acid on a broad range of BV-associated bacteria and vaginal lactobacilli...
  11. pmc Rapid fluctuation of the vaginal microbiota measured by Gram stain analysis
    Rebecca M Brotman
    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, BioPark Building II, 801 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Sex Transm Infect 86:297-302. 2010
    ..The aetiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV) remains unknown...
  12. doi request reprint Evaluation of microbicide gel adherence monitoring methods
    Thomas R Moench
    ReProtect, Inc, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 39:335-40. 2012
    ....
  13. pmc Vaginal transmission of cell-associated HIV-1 in the mouse is blocked by a topical, membrane-modifying agent
    Kristen V Khanna
    Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Clin Invest 109:205-11. 2002
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint A self-sampling method to obtain large volumes of undiluted cervicovaginal secretions
    Elizabeth R Boskey
    Thomas C Jenkins Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 30:107-9. 2003
    ..A convenient method for self-sampling these secretions outside a clinical setting can facilitate such studies of reproductive health...
  15. pmc Enhanced vaginal drug delivery through the use of hypotonic formulations that induce fluid uptake
    Laura M Ensign
    Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA Department of Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
    Biomaterials 34:6922-9. 2013
    ..Hypotonic formulations for vaginal drug delivery via MPP may significantly improve prevention and treatment of reproductive tract diseases and disorders. ..

Research Grants2

  1. Duet cervical barrier device for maximizing protective efficacy of microbicides
    Richard Cone; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Duet" covers the cervix for maximum protection of this susceptible site for infections, and delivers microbicide gel to protect both the cervix and vagina. The reusable Duet will be low in cost and useful for low-resource areas. ..