Janice E Clements

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Regulation of CCL2 expression by an upstream TALE homeodomain protein-binding site that synergizes with the site created by the A-2578G SNP
    Stephen H Page
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e22052. 2011
  2. pmc Coordinated regulation of SIV replication and immune responses in the CNS
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8129. 2009
  3. pmc SIV replication is directly downregulated by four antiviral miRNAs
    Jeanne M Sisk
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Edward D, Miller Research Building, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Retrovirology 10:95. 2013
  4. pmc A simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model of highly active antiretroviral treatment: viral latency in the periphery and the central nervous system
    Janice E Clements
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Curr Opin HIV AIDS 6:37-42. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint The central nervous system is a viral reservoir in simian immunodeficiency virus--infected macaques on combined antiretroviral therapy: a model for human immunodeficiency virus patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Janice E Clements
    Retrovirus Laboratory, Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurovirol 11:180-9. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal analysis of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication in the lungs: compartmentalized regulation of SIV
    Sheila A Barber
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Infect Dis 194:931-8. 2006
  7. pmc Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy have reduced central nervous system viral replication and inflammation but persistence of viral DNA
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 202:161-70. 2010
  8. pmc Minocycline attenuates HIV infection and reactivation by suppressing cellular activation in human CD4+ T cells
    Gregory L Szeto
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 201:1132-40. 2010
  9. pmc Initiation of HAART during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection rapidly controls virus replication in the CNS by enhancing immune activity and preserving protective immune responses
    David R Graham
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, BRB 831, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 17:120-30. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint CUGBP1 is required for IFNbeta-mediated induction of dominant-negative CEBPbeta and suppression of SIV replication in macrophages
    Justyna M Dudaronek
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Immunol 179:7262-9. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications54

  1. pmc Regulation of CCL2 expression by an upstream TALE homeodomain protein-binding site that synergizes with the site created by the A-2578G SNP
    Stephen H Page
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e22052. 2011
    ....
  2. pmc Coordinated regulation of SIV replication and immune responses in the CNS
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8129. 2009
    ..These studies further suggest that interventions should target HIV-infected individuals with increased CCL2 levels or HIV RNA in the CNS...
  3. pmc SIV replication is directly downregulated by four antiviral miRNAs
    Jeanne M Sisk
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Edward D, Miller Research Building, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Retrovirology 10:95. 2013
    ..We examined whether specific host miRNAs directly target SIV RNA early in infection and might be induced via type I interferon pathways...
  4. pmc A simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model of highly active antiretroviral treatment: viral latency in the periphery and the central nervous system
    Janice E Clements
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Curr Opin HIV AIDS 6:37-42. 2011
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint The central nervous system is a viral reservoir in simian immunodeficiency virus--infected macaques on combined antiretroviral therapy: a model for human immunodeficiency virus patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Janice E Clements
    Retrovirus Laboratory, Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurovirol 11:180-9. 2005
    ..This suggests that the brain may serve as a long-term viral reservoir in HIV-infected individuals treated with antiretroviral drugs that suppress virus replication...
  6. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal analysis of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication in the lungs: compartmentalized regulation of SIV
    Sheila A Barber
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Infect Dis 194:931-8. 2006
    ..In the present study, we examine virus replication in the lungs and in cells recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples in a comprehensive, longitudinal analysis of an SIV/macaque model...
  7. pmc Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy have reduced central nervous system viral replication and inflammation but persistence of viral DNA
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 202:161-70. 2010
    ..During the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the prevalence of HIV-associated central nervous system (CNS) disease has increased despite suppression of plasma viremia...
  8. pmc Minocycline attenuates HIV infection and reactivation by suppressing cellular activation in human CD4+ T cells
    Gregory L Szeto
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 201:1132-40. 2010
    ..The anti-HIV effects of minocycline are mediated by altering the cellular environment rather than directly targeting virus, placing minocycline in the class of anticellular anti-HIV drugs...
  9. pmc Initiation of HAART during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection rapidly controls virus replication in the CNS by enhancing immune activity and preserving protective immune responses
    David R Graham
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, BRB 831, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 17:120-30. 2011
    ..Collectively, these data indicate preserved innate and adaptive immune activity in the brain following HAART initiation during acute SIV infection in this macaque model, suggesting profound benefits following acute treatment of SIV...
  10. ncbi request reprint CUGBP1 is required for IFNbeta-mediated induction of dominant-negative CEBPbeta and suppression of SIV replication in macrophages
    Justyna M Dudaronek
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Immunol 179:7262-9. 2007
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Progressive selection for neurovirulent genotypes in the brain of SIV-infected macaques
    Tahar Babas
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    AIDS 20:197-205. 2006
    ..To compare the viral genotypes present in RNA from brain and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and DNA from brain during acute, asymptomatic and late stages of SIV infection of macaques...
  12. ncbi request reprint Mechanism for the establishment of transcriptional HIV latency in the brain in a simian immunodeficiency virus-macaque model
    Sheila A Barber
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Infect Dis 193:963-70. 2006
    ..The brain is considered to be a reservoir of latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We examined the mechanism by which innate immune responses contribute to the establishment of this reservoir...
  13. pmc Expression of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) nef in astrocytes during acute and terminal infection and requirement of nef for optimal replication of neurovirulent SIV in vitro
    Emily D Overholser
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Virol 77:6855-66. 2003
    ....
  14. pmc CD4-independent entry and replication of simian immunodeficiency virus in primary rhesus macaque astrocytes are regulated by the transmembrane protein
    Emily D Overholser
    The Reterovirus Laboratory, Department of Comparitive Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, 819 BRB, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Virol 79:4944-51. 2005
    ....
  15. pmc A simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaque model to study viral reservoirs that persist during highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Jason B Dinoso
    Department of Pharmacology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 83:9247-57. 2009
    ....
  16. pmc Regulation of SIV mac 239 basal long terminal repeat activity and viral replication in macrophages: functional roles of two CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta sites in activation and interferon beta-mediated suppression
    Shruthi Ravimohan
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:2258-73. 2010
    ..In conjunction with previous studies from our laboratory, we demonstrate the importance of these sites in virus gene expression, and we propose a model for their role in establishing latency and persistence in macrophages in the brain...
  17. pmc MicroRNA regulation of IFN-beta protein expression: rapid and sensitive modulation of the innate immune response
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Immunol 184:2369-76. 2010
    ..Thus, miRNAs may contribute significantly to the regulation of IFN-beta in innate immune responses...
  18. pmc Novel pathway for induction of latent virus from resting CD4(+) T cells in the simian immunodeficiency virus/macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 latency
    Anding Shen
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Virol 81:1660-70. 2007
    ..This is the first demonstration that costimulatory signals can induce latent virus without the coengagement of the T-cell receptor, and this study might provide insights into potential pathways to target latent HIV-1...
  19. pmc Resting CD4+ T lymphocytes but not thymocytes provide a latent viral reservoir in a simian immunodeficiency virus-Macaca nemestrina model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy
    Anding Shen
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 77:4938-49. 2003
    ..The results provide the first evidence for a latent viral reservoir for SIV in macaques and the most extensive survey of the distribution of latently infected cells in the host...
  20. pmc Expansion of a subset of CD14highCD16negCCR2low/neg monocytes functionally similar to myeloid-derived suppressor cells during SIV and HIV infection
    Lucio Gama
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, BRB 831, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 91:803-16. 2012
    ..Antiretroviral therapy in infected macaque and human subjects caused this population to decline, suggesting that this atypical phenotype is linked to viral replication...
  21. pmc Role of microglial cells in selective replication of simian immunodeficiency virus genotypes in the brain
    Tahar Babas
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Virol 77:208-16. 2003
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Innate immune responses and control of acute simian immunodeficiency virus replication in the central nervous system
    Sheila A Barber
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 10:15-20. 2004
    ..i. in parallel with increased expression of the dominant-negative isoform of C/EBPbeta. These results suggest that innate immune responses involving IFNbeta may contribute to the mechanism(s) controlling acute SIV replication in the CNS...
  23. ncbi request reprint The central nervous system as a reservoir for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV): steady-state levels of SIV DNA in brain from acute through asymptomatic infection
    Janice E Clements
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Infect Dis 186:905-13. 2002
    ..Latent virus in the brain must be considered in therapeutic strategies to eliminate HIV from infected persons...
  24. pmc Tissue-specific interferon alpha subtype response to SIV infection in brain, spleen, and lung
    Luna Alammar Zaritsky
    Department of Molecular, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Interferon Cytokine Res 33:24-33. 2013
    ..Understanding the IFNalpha subtype response in tissues known to be infected with HIV/SIV can help tailor adjunctive treatment regimens to highly active antiretroviral therapy...
  25. pmc SIV/macaque model of HIV infection in cocaine users: minimal effects of cocaine on behavior, virus replication, and CNS inflammation
    MICHAEL WEED
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 7:401-11. 2012
    ....
  26. pmc Replication-competent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag escape mutations archived in latent reservoirs during antiretroviral treatment of SIV-infected macaques
    Suzanne E Queen
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 2196, USA
    J Virol 85:9167-75. 2011
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint SIV-specific T lymphocyte responses in PBMC and lymphoid tissues of SIV-infected pigtailed macaques during suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy
    Lucy M Carruth
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Jefferson Street Building, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Med Primatol 34:109-21. 2005
    ..Conversely, in the setting of low initial viremia and robust T lymphocyte responses, treatment does not have a detrimental effect on the immune response...
  28. pmc A plasma microRNA signature of acute lentiviral infection: biomarkers of central nervous system disease
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    AIDS 25:2057-67. 2011
    ....
  29. pmc Severe depletion of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells from the intestinal lamina propria but not peripheral blood or lymph nodes during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection
    Amanda J Chase
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Virol 81:12748-57. 2007
    ..These results indicate that Tregs are rapidly depleted in the GALT of SIV-infected macaques, defining a role for the loss of Treg-mediated suppression in early events in the pathogenesis of the disease...
  30. ncbi request reprint Conserved serines in simian immunodeficiency virus capsid are required for virus budding
    Sarah M Rue
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, Room 831, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Virology 336:37-50. 2005
    ..Together, these results indicate that certain residues in the CA N terminus are crucial for early budding events...
  31. ncbi request reprint Sequence variation in the CC-chemokine ligand 2 promoter of pigtailed macaques is not associated with the incidence or severity of neuropathology in a simian immunodeficiency virus model of human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system disease
    Edward K Wright
    McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Neurovirol 12:411-9. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that the determinants of neuropathogenesis in this SIV model are distinct from variation in these regions of the CCL2 promoter...
  32. pmc miRNA profiles of monocyte-lineage cells are consistent with complicated roles in HIV-1 restriction
    Jeanne M Sisk
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Viruses 4:1844-64. 2012
    ....
  33. pmc Canonical type I IFN signaling in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macrophages is disrupted by astrocyte-secreted CCL2
    Luna Alammar Zaritsky
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Immunol 188:3876-85. 2012
    ..The interactions between chemokine and cytokine pathways are a novel finding that may specifically occur in the CNS...
  34. doi request reprint The accelerated simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurological disease: from mechanism to treatment
    Janice E Clements
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Neurovirol 14:309-17. 2008
    ....
  35. ncbi request reprint An internal ribosome entry site promotes translation of a novel SIV Pr55(Gag) isoform
    Michael G Nicholson
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway Rm 831, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Virology 349:325-34. 2006
    ..Additionally, we present data that suggest SIV p43 affects viral replication in cell culture...
  36. ncbi request reprint From mice to macaques--animal models of HIV nervous system disease
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Curr HIV Res 4:293-305. 2006
    ....
  37. pmc Phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of gag proteins in budded simian immunodeficiency virus
    Sarah M Rue
    Department of Comparative Medicine, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Virol 79:2484-92. 2005
    ..Taken together, these data indicate that, in SIV virions, phosphorylation of CA domains in Pr55(Gag) and several of its cleavage intermediates likely precedes the cleavage of these domains by the viral protease...
  38. ncbi request reprint Protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates the Nef protein from a neurovirulent simian immunodeficiency virus
    Matthew J Caples
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway St, Broadway Research Building 831, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Virology 348:156-64. 2006
    ..Using site-directed mutagenesis and kinase-specific inhibitors, we have identified this kinase as the ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase, protein kinase CK2...
  39. pmc Quantitation of gene expression in formaldehyde-fixed and fluorescence-activated sorted cells
    Julia N Russell
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e73849. 2013
    ..These results provide a systematic procedure to quantitate gene expression in cells that have been fixed with formaldehyde and sorted by FACS. ..
  40. pmc Minocycline suppresses activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) in human CD4+ T cells
    Gregory L Szeto
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Biol Chem 286:11275-82. 2011
    ..These findings provide a novel mechanism for minocycline induced suppression of CD4(+) T cell activation and may better inform the application of minocycline as an immunomodulatory agent...
  41. pmc Hydrogen bonding at a conserved threonine in lentivirus capsid is required for virus replication
    Sarah M Rue
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Virol 77:8009-18. 2003
    ..As hydrogen bonding between these two residues is present in HIV CA as well, this interaction presents a potential target for antiviral drug design...
  42. pmc A quantitative measurement of antiviral activity of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drugs against simian immunodeficiency virus infection: dose-response curve slope strongly influences class-specific inhibitory potential
    Kai Deng
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    J Virol 86:11368-72. 2012
    ....
  43. pmc Induction of innate immune responses by SIV in vivo and in vitro: differential expression and function of RIG-I and MDA5
    Juliene G Co
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Infect Dis 204:1104-14. 2011
    ..We have shown for the first time to our knowledge the functional role of MDA5 in the innate immune response to SIV infection...
  44. pmc The SIVmac239 Pr55Gag isoform, SIV p43, suppresses proteolytic cleavage of Pr55Gag
    Michael G Nicholson
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Virology 360:84-91. 2007
    ..Additionally, intracellular cleavage of Pr55Gag is increased in SIVmac239 p43(-), suggesting that SIV p43 suppresses premature cleavage of Pr55Gag by the viral protease...
  45. ncbi request reprint A novel simian immunodeficiency virus model that provides insight into mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system disease
    M Christine Zink
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    J Neurovirol 8:42-8. 2002
    ....
  46. pmc Detection of microbial translocation in HIV and SIV infection using the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay is masked by serum and plasma
    Ashwin Balagopal
    Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e41258. 2012
    ..However, related research has been impeded by inconsistent LPS test results...
  47. pmc Relationships of PBMC microRNA expression, plasma viral load, and CD4+ T-cell count in HIV-1-infected elite suppressors and viremic patients
    Kenneth W Witwer
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 North Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland 21025, USA
    Retrovirology 9:5. 2012
    ..Using samples from a well-characterized ES cohort, untreated viremic patients, and uninfected controls, we explored the PBMC miRNA profile and probed the relationships of miRNA expression, CD4+ T-cell counts, and viral load...
  48. ncbi request reprint Central nervous system correlates of behavioral deficits following simian immunodeficiency virus infection
    Michael R Weed
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Biology Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    J Neurovirol 9:452-64. 2003
    ..Therefore, axonal damage may be a morphologic manifestation of neuronal dysfunction that underlies development of behavioral impairment in HIV/SIV CNS infection...
  49. ncbi request reprint Searching for clues: tracking the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system disease by use of an accelerated, consistent simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model
    Joseph L Mankowski
    Department of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 7609, USA
    J Infect Dis 186:S199-208. 2002
    ..This model is ideal to track the viral, cellular, and immunologic changes in the brain during acute and asymptomatic infection and during viral recrudescence and SIV encephalitis...
  50. pmc Simian immunodeficiency virus infection in the brain and lung leads to differential type I IFN signaling during acute infection
    Luna Alammar
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    J Immunol 186:4008-18. 2011
    ..These data provide a novel observation that during acute SIV infection in the brain, there is differential signaling through the IFN-α/β receptor that fails to activate expression of IFN-α in the brain...
  51. pmc Tristetraprolin expression and microRNA-mediated regulation during simian immunodeficiency virus infection of the central nervous system
    Jonathan Liu
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N, Broadway, Miller Research Building Rm, 829, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Mol Brain 6:40. 2013
    ..This control is lost during progression to disease. In this study, we assessed TTP regulation and association with cytokine regulation in the brain during SIV infection...
  52. pmc Visna virus-induced activation of MAPK is required for virus replication and correlates with virus-induced neuropathology
    Sheila A Barber
    Division of Comparative Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Virol 76:817-28. 2002
    ....
  53. ncbi request reprint Dual role of novel ingenol derivatives from Euphorbia tirucalli in HIV replication: inhibition of de novo infection and activation of viral LTR
    Celina M Abreu
    Departamento de Genetica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e97257. 2014
    ..Although the mechanisms of action of the three ISDs are primarily attributed to the PKC pathway, downregulation of surface receptors and stimulation of the viral LTR might be differentially modulated by different PKC isoforms. ..
  54. doi request reprint Witwer, K.W.; et al. Correction: miRNA Profiles of Monocyte-Lineage Cells Are Consistent with Complicated Roles in HIV-1 Restriction. Viruses 2012, 4, 1844-1864
    Jeanne M Sisk
    Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N Broadway, Edward D Miller Research Building, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Viruses 5:901. 2013
    ..3390/v4101844 (Viruses 2012, 4, 1844-1864), contained an incorrect digit. On page 1860, (Acknowledgments), U19 support was incorrectly listed as AI076113. The correct designation is AI096113...