Roger W Innes

Summary

Affiliation: Indiana University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Exploiting Combinatorial Interactions to Expand NLR Specificity
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, 915 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA Electronic address
    Cell Host Microbe 18:265-7. 2015
  2. ncbi request reprint Activation of plant nod-like receptors: how indirect can it be?
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, 47405, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 9:87-9. 2011
  3. pmc Differential accumulation of retroelements and diversification of NB-LRR disease resistance genes in duplicated regions following polyploidy in the ancestor of soybean
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 148:1740-59. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint New effects of type III effectors
    Roger Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 7107, USA
    Mol Microbiol 50:363-5. 2003
  5. pmc Guarding the goods. New insights into the central alarm system of plants
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 7107, USA
    Plant Physiol 135:695-701. 2004
  6. pmc Replication of nonautonomous retroelements in soybean appears to be both recent and common
    Adam Wawrzynski
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 148:1760-71. 2008
  7. pmc The KEEP ON GOING protein of Arabidopsis regulates intracellular protein trafficking and is degraded during fungal infection
    Yangnan Gu
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Cell 24:4717-30. 2012
  8. pmc Evolution of a complex disease resistance gene cluster in diploid Phaseolus and tetraploid Glycine
    Tom Ashfield
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 159:336-54. 2012
  9. pmc Regulation of plant disease resistance, stress responses, cell death, and ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis by the EDR1 protein kinase
    Dingzhong Tang
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 7107, USA
    Plant Physiol 138:1018-26. 2005
  10. pmc Synergistic activation of defense responses in Arabidopsis by simultaneous loss of the GSL5 callose synthase and the EDR1 protein kinase
    Anna Wawrzynska
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 23:578-84. 2010

Collaborators

  • Dingzhong Tang
  • Nevin D Young
  • Valerie Geffroy
  • Ashley N Egan
  • Jeff J Doyle
  • Jing Yi
  • Steven B Cannon
  • Sun Kim
  • Jack E Dixon
  • Pablo Tornero
  • David A Lightfoot
  • Zhongying Chen
  • Ken Shirasu
  • Barbara N Kunkel
  • John M McDowell
  • Khalid Meksem
  • JEFFERY DANGL
  • Tom Ashfield
  • Brody J DeYoung
  • Dong Qi
  • Yangnan Gu
  • Anna Wawrzynska
  • Ryan Kessens
  • Feng Shao
  • Ram Podicheti
  • Katy M Christiansen
  • Andrew R Russell
  • Ullrich Dubiella
  • Irene Serrano
  • Jules Ade
  • Laura E Ong
  • Natalie Rodibaugh
  • Kan Nobuta
  • Milind B Ratnaparkhe
  • Roxanne Denny
  • Bernard E Pfeil
  • Carine Ameline-Torregrosa
  • M A Saghai Maroof
  • Nicolas W G Chen
  • Bruce A Roe
  • Natalie L Rodibaugh
  • Adam Wawrzynski
  • Catherine Golstein
  • Minfeng Zhu
  • Thomas Redditt
  • Robert H Dowen
  • D Isaiah Sloss
  • Lauren Galloway
  • Andrew Russell
  • Qing Kang
  • Thomas P Burke
  • Arnaud Couloux
  • Shweta Deshpande
  • Sylvie Samain
  • Ashley Nguyen
  • Vincent Thareau
  • Mireille Sévignac
  • Stacy Howell
  • Beatrice Segurens
  • Natasha Glover
  • Iryna Sanders
  • Anita Dalwani
  • Ethalinda Cannon
  • Jafar Mammadov
  • Dan Ilut
  • Hongshing Lai
  • Michelle Metcalf
  • Sara Martin Del Campo
  • Sue Sherman-Broyles
  • Ben Chacko
  • Dominic M Tucker
  • Yinan Lan
  • Majesta O'Bleness
  • Christopher M Schneider
  • Zhaohui Xu
  • Randy C Shoemaker
  • Dariush Danesh
  • Adam D Henk
  • Anna Bocian
  • Laura Fredrick Marek
  • Mark Stoutemyer
  • Silvia Penuela
  • Dan Held
  • Peter M Merritt
  • Zhaoqin Bao

Detail Information

Publications37

  1. doi request reprint Exploiting Combinatorial Interactions to Expand NLR Specificity
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, 915 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA Electronic address
    Cell Host Microbe 18:265-7. 2015
    ..In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Wang et al. (2015) show that a single plant NLR can detect diverse pathogen effectors by partnering with different scaffolding proteins, which can each recognize distinct effector targets...
  2. ncbi request reprint Activation of plant nod-like receptors: how indirect can it be?
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, 47405, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 9:87-9. 2011
    ..In this issue, two groups show that the RPM1 NLR is activated by phosphorylation of the host protein RIN4, probably resulting from activation of a host kinase by pathogen effectors...
  3. pmc Differential accumulation of retroelements and diversification of NB-LRR disease resistance genes in duplicated regions following polyploidy in the ancestor of soybean
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 148:1740-59. 2008
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint New effects of type III effectors
    Roger Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 7107, USA
    Mol Microbiol 50:363-5. 2003
    ..This work is providing some of the first insights into how plant pathogens subvert host cell signalling machinery to cause disease...
  5. pmc Guarding the goods. New insights into the central alarm system of plants
    Roger W Innes
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 7107, USA
    Plant Physiol 135:695-701. 2004
  6. pmc Replication of nonautonomous retroelements in soybean appears to be both recent and common
    Adam Wawrzynski
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 148:1760-71. 2008
    ..The impact of nonautonomous retrotransposon replication on genome size appears to be much greater than previously appreciated...
  7. pmc The KEEP ON GOING protein of Arabidopsis regulates intracellular protein trafficking and is degraded during fungal infection
    Yangnan Gu
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Cell 24:4717-30. 2012
    ....
  8. pmc Evolution of a complex disease resistance gene cluster in diploid Phaseolus and tetraploid Glycine
    Tom Ashfield
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 159:336-54. 2012
    ..We conclude that while polyploidization in Glycine has not driven a stable increase in family size for NB-LRR genes, it has generated two recombinationally isolated clusters, one of which appears to be in the process of decay...
  9. pmc Regulation of plant disease resistance, stress responses, cell death, and ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis by the EDR1 protein kinase
    Dingzhong Tang
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 7107, USA
    Plant Physiol 138:1018-26. 2005
    ....
  10. pmc Synergistic activation of defense responses in Arabidopsis by simultaneous loss of the GSL5 callose synthase and the EDR1 protein kinase
    Anna Wawrzynska
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 23:578-84. 2010
    ..Our data suggest that EDR1 and GSL5 negatively regulate SA and JA production or signaling by independent mechanisms and that negative regulation of defense signaling by GSL5 may be independent of callose production...
  11. pmc Structure-function analysis of the coiled-coil and leucine-rich repeat domains of the RPS5 disease resistance protein
    Dong Qi
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 158:1819-32. 2012
    ..We conclude that the RPS5 LRR domain functions to suppress RPS5 activation in the absence of PBS1 cleavage and promotes RPS5 activation in its presence...
  12. pmc Convergent evolution of disease resistance gene specificity in two flowering plant families
    Tom Ashfield
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 7107, USA
    Plant Cell 16:309-18. 2004
    ..We conclude that convergent evolution, rather than the conservation of an ancient specificity, is responsible for the generation of these AvrB-specific genes...
  13. pmc A mutation in the GTP hydrolysis site of Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E confers enhanced cell death in response to powdery mildew infection
    Dingzhong Tang
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Plant J 47:75-84. 2006
    ..These observations suggest a mechanistic link between salicylic acid signaling, mitochondria and programmed cell death in plants...
  14. pmc Activation of a plant nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat disease resistance protein by a modified self protein
    Brody J DeYoung
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
    Cell Microbiol 14:1071-84. 2012
    ..This finding suggests that NB-LRR proteins may function as fine-tuned sensors of alterations in the structures of effector targets...
  15. ncbi request reprint Diversification of non-TIR class NB-LRR genes in relation to whole-genome duplication events in Arabidopsis
    Kan Nobuta
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 18:103-9. 2005
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint AvrB mutants lose both virulence and avirulence activities on soybean and Arabidopsis
    Laura E Ong
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Mol Microbiol 60:951-62. 2006
    ..Our results suggest that soybean and Arabidopsis recognize AvrB in the same manner, and that AvrB enzymatic activity is required for its function as an avirulence and virulence effector on two different plant species...
  17. pmc Regulation of plant defense responses in Arabidopsis by EDR2, a PH and START domain-containing protein
    Dingzhong Tang
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Plant J 44:245-57. 2005
    ..The PH and START domains are implicated in lipid binding, suggesting that EDR2 may provide a link between lipid signaling and activation of programmed cell death mediated by mitochondria...
  18. ncbi request reprint The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpt2 functions downstream or independently of SA to promote virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana
    Zhongying Chen
    Department of Biology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Plant J 37:494-504. 2004
    ..Additionally, avrRpt2 transgenic plants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to Peronospora parasitica and Erysiphe cichoracearum, suggesting that AvrRpt2 virulence activity is specific to P. syringae...
  19. pmc Mutations in LACS2, a long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase, enhance susceptibility to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae but confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis
    Dingzhong Tang
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 144:1093-103. 2007
    ..All three displayed an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Our results indicate that plant cutin or cuticle structure may play a crucial role in tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress and in the pathogenesis of B. cinerea...
  20. pmc Negative regulation of defence signalling pathways by the EDR1 protein kinase
    Katy M Christiansen
    Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Mol Plant Pathol 12:746-58. 2011
    ....
  21. pmc Powdery mildew resistance conferred by loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 protein kinase is suppressed by a missense mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a regulator of abscisic acid signaling
    Anna Wawrzynska
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Plant Physiol 148:1510-22. 2008
    ..We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling...
  22. ncbi request reprint Overexpression of a kinase-deficient form of the EDR1 gene enhances powdery mildew resistance and ethylene-induced senescence in Arabidopsis
    Dingzhong Tang
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 7107, USA
    Plant J 32:975-83. 2002
    ..Overexpression of orthologous dnEDR1 constructs may provide a novel strategy for controlling powdery mildew disease in crops...
  23. ncbi request reprint The rules of engagement. The XIII International Congress on Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, Sorrento, Italy, July 2007
    Brody J DeYoung
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    New Phytol 176:506-10. 2007
  24. pmc Indirect activation of a plant nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat protein by a bacterial protease
    Jules Ade
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 7107, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:2531-6. 2007
    ..Combined, these data suggest that ATP versus ADP binding functions as a molecular switch that is flipped by cleavage of PBS1...
  25. pmc Plant NBS-LRR proteins in pathogen sensing and host defense
    Brody J DeYoung
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Nat Immunol 7:1243-9. 2006
    ..Such conformational alterations are thought to promote the exchange of ADP for ATP by the NBS domain, which activates 'downstream' signaling, by an unknown mechanism, leading to pathogen resistance...
  26. pmc The Arabidopsis EDR1 protein kinase negatively regulates the ATL1 E3 ubiquitin ligase to suppress cell death
    Irene Serrano
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405
    Plant Cell 26:4532-46. 2014
    ..Taken together, our data indicate that ATL1 is a positive regulator of programmed cell death and EDR1 negatively regulates ATL1 activity at the TGN/EE and thus controls stress responses initiated by ATL1-mediated ubiquitination events. ..
  27. pmc Recognition of the protein kinase AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE1 by the disease resistance protein RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE5 is dependent on s-acylation and an exposed loop in AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE1
    Dong Qi
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405
    Plant Physiol 164:340-51. 2014
    ..These findings provide support for a model of NLR activation in which NLR proteins form a preactivation complex with effector targets and then sense a conformational change in the target induced by effector modification. ..
  28. ncbi request reprint Genetic and physical localization of the soybean Rpg1-b disease resistance gene reveals a complex locus containing several tightly linked families of NBS-LRR genes
    Tom Ashfield
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 16:817-26. 2003
    ..At least five CC-NBS-LRR-type genes cosegregate with Rpg1-b in our large mapping populations...
  29. pmc The KEEP ON GOING protein of Arabidopsis recruits the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 protein to trans-Golgi network/early endosome vesicles
    Yangnan Gu
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 7107, USA
    Plant Physiol 155:1827-38. 2011
    ..Collectively, these data suggest that EDR1 and KEG function together to regulate endocytic trafficking and/or the formation of signaling complexes on TGN/EE vesicles during stress responses...
  30. pmc Determining the GmRIN4 requirements of the soybean disease resistance proteins Rpg1b and Rpg1r using a nicotiana glutinosa-based agroinfiltration system
    Ryan Kessens
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e108159. 2014
    ..These observations suggest that an endogenous RIN4 gene in N. glutinosa can substitute for the soybean RIN4 ortholog in the recognition of AvrRpm1 by Rpg1r. ..
  31. pmc Evolutionary relationship of disease resistance genes in soybean and Arabidopsis specific for the Pseudomonas syringae effectors AvrB and AvrRpm1
    Tom Ashfield
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405
    Plant Physiol 166:235-51. 2014
    ....
  32. pmc RAR1 and NDR1 contribute quantitatively to disease resistance in Arabidopsis, and their relative contributions are dependent on the R gene assayed
    Pablo Tornero
    Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    Plant Cell 14:1005-15. 2002
    ..In Atrar1 null plants, the levels of RPM1-myc are reduced severely, suggesting that AtRAR1 may regulate R protein stability or accumulation...
  33. doi request reprint Pseudomonas syringae Effector AvrPphB Suppresses AvrB-Induced Activation of RPM1 but Not AvrRpm1-Induced Activation
    Andrew R Russell
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, U S A
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 28:727-35. 2015
    ..Taken together, our results indicate that AvrB and AvrPphB target a conserved defense signaling pathway in Arabidopsis and soybean that includes RIPK and RIN4. ..
  34. ncbi request reprint Cleavage of Arabidopsis PBS1 by a bacterial type III effector
    Feng Shao
    Department of Biological Chemistry, Medical School and Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Science 301:1230-3. 2003
    ..AvrPphB was found to proteolytically cleave PBS1, and this cleavage was required for RPS5-mediated resistance, which indicates that AvrPphB is detected indirectly via its enzymatic activity...
  35. pmc The crystal structure of Pseudomonas avirulence protein AvrPphB: a papain-like fold with a distinct substrate-binding site
    Minfeng Zhu
    Department of Biological Chemistry, Medical School and Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:302-7. 2004
    ..Further implications about the specificity of plant pathogen recognition are also discussed...
  36. ncbi request reprint A Yersinia effector and a Pseudomonas avirulence protein define a family of cysteine proteases functioning in bacterial pathogenesis
    Feng Shao
    Department of Biological Chemistry, Medical School and Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Cell 109:575-88. 2002
    ..These findings provide new insights into mechanisms of animal and plant pathogenesis...