S Luke Flory

Summary

Affiliation: Indiana University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Invasive Microstegium populations consistently outperform native range populations across diverse environments
    S Luke Flory
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Ecology 92:2248-57. 2011
  2. doi request reprint Response of host plants to periodical cicada oviposition damage
    S Luke Flory
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 156:649-56. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Non-native grass invasion suppresses forest succession
    S Luke Flory
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 164:1029-38. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Competitive context alters plant-soil feedback in an experimental woodland community
    Sarah Shannon
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 169:235-43. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Positive feedbacks to growth of an invasive grass through alteration of nitrogen cycling
    Marissa R Lee
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 170:457-65. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Exotic grass invasion reduces survival of Amblyomma americanum and Dermacentor variabilis ticks (Acari: Ixodidae)
    David J Civitello
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd St, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    J Med Entomol 45:867-72. 2008

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. ncbi request reprint Invasive Microstegium populations consistently outperform native range populations across diverse environments
    S Luke Flory
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Ecology 92:2248-57. 2011
    ..Further, the ability of Microstegium to survive and grow across the wide variety of environmental conditions demonstrates that few habitats are immune to invasion...
  2. doi request reprint Response of host plants to periodical cicada oviposition damage
    S Luke Flory
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 156:649-56. 2008
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Non-native grass invasion suppresses forest succession
    S Luke Flory
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 164:1029-38. 2010
    ..Suppression of tree regeneration by Microstegium invasions may slow the rate of forest succession and alter tree species composition...
  4. doi request reprint Competitive context alters plant-soil feedback in an experimental woodland community
    Sarah Shannon
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 169:235-43. 2012
    ..Such context-dependency implies that soil feedback may change when competitive interactions between natives and invading species shift as invasions progress...
  5. doi request reprint Positive feedbacks to growth of an invasive grass through alteration of nitrogen cycling
    Marissa R Lee
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 170:457-65. 2012
    ..Collectively, our results demonstrate that persistence of invasive plants can be promoted by positive feedbacks with soil resources but that the magnitude of feedbacks may depend on interspecific interactions...
  6. ncbi request reprint Exotic grass invasion reduces survival of Amblyomma americanum and Dermacentor variabilis ticks (Acari: Ixodidae)
    David J Civitello
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd St, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    J Med Entomol 45:867-72. 2008
    ....