R W Wrangham

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Male coercion and the costs of promiscuous mating for female chimpanzees
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1009-14. 2007
  2. doi request reprint Shallow-water habitats as sources of fallback foods for hominins
    Richard Wrangham
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:630-42. 2009
  3. doi request reprint Intergroup aggression in chimpanzees and war in nomadic hunter-gatherers: evaluating the chimpanzee model
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Hum Nat 23:5-29. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees: the culture-zone concept becomes untidy
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R634-5. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Comparative rates of violence in chimpanzees and humans
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Primates 47:14-26. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Collective violence: comparisons between youths and chimpanzees
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1036:233-56. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint 'Cooking as a biological trait'
    Richard Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:35-46. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Sexual mimicry in hyenas
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Q Rev Biol 77:3-16. 2002
  9. pmc Differential changes in steroid hormones before competition in bonobos and chimpanzees
    Victoria Wobber
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:12457-62. 2010
  10. doi request reprint Great apes prefer cooked food
    Victoria Wobber
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:340-8. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. pmc Male coercion and the costs of promiscuous mating for female chimpanzees
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1009-14. 2007
    ..Such aggression can be viewed as a counter-strategy to female attempts at paternity confusion, and a cost of multi-male mating...
  2. doi request reprint Shallow-water habitats as sources of fallback foods for hominins
    Richard Wrangham
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:630-42. 2009
    ..It also raises the possibility that harvesting efficiency in shallow water promoted adaptations for habitual bipedality in early hominins...
  3. doi request reprint Intergroup aggression in chimpanzees and war in nomadic hunter-gatherers: evaluating the chimpanzee model
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Hum Nat 23:5-29. 2012
    ..Whether humans have evolved specific psychological adaptations for war is unknown, but current evidence suggests that the chimpanzee model is an appropriate starting point for analyzing the biological and cultural evolution of warfare...
  4. ncbi request reprint Chimpanzees: the culture-zone concept becomes untidy
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R634-5. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Comparative rates of violence in chimpanzees and humans
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Primates 47:14-26. 2006
    ..Chimpanzees had rates of aggression between two and three orders of magnitude higher than humans. These preliminary data support Boehm's hypothesis...
  6. ncbi request reprint Collective violence: comparisons between youths and chimpanzees
    Richard W Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1036:233-56. 2004
    ..We therefore view the similarities in aggression between humans and chimpanzees that we review here as being adaptive responses to local conditions, predicated on an inherent male concern for social status...
  7. ncbi request reprint 'Cooking as a biological trait'
    Richard Wrangham
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:35-46. 2003
    ..Further investigation is therefore needed of the ways in which human digestive physiology is constrained by the need for food of relatively high caloric density compared to other great apes...
  8. ncbi request reprint Sexual mimicry in hyenas
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Q Rev Biol 77:3-16. 2002
    ..Current data suggest that if sexual mimicry is important, its effects are strongest among infants...
  9. pmc Differential changes in steroid hormones before competition in bonobos and chimpanzees
    Victoria Wobber
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:12457-62. 2010
    ..In turn, common selection pressures in human evolution may have acted on the psychology and the endocrinology of our competitive behavior...
  10. doi request reprint Great apes prefer cooked food
    Victoria Wobber
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:340-8. 2008
    ..The results, therefore, challenge the hypothesis that the control of fire preceded cooking by a significant period...
  11. doi request reprint Bonobos exhibit delayed development of social behavior and cognition relative to chimpanzees
    Victoria Wobber
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Curr Biol 20:226-30. 2010
    ..The results suggest that these social and cognitive differences between two closely related species result from evolutionary changes in brain development...
  12. ncbi request reprint The rise of the hominids as an adaptive shift in fallback foods: plant underground storage organs (USOs) and australopith origins
    Greg Laden
    Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 301 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Hum Evol 49:482-98. 2005
    ..Our hypothesis implicates fallback foods as a critical limiting factor with far-reaching evolutionary effects. This complements the more common focus on adaptations to preferred foods, such as fruit and meat, in hominid evolution...
  13. ncbi request reprint Social cognitive evolution in captive foxes is a correlated by-product of experimental domestication
    Brian Hare
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Curr Biol 15:226-30. 2005
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Cooking and the human commitment to a high-quality diet
    R N Carmody
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 74:427-34. 2009
    ..Additional experimental work is needed to help discriminate the relative contributions of cooking, meat eating, and other innovations such as nonthermal food processing in supporting the human transition toward dietary quality...
  15. ncbi request reprint Toshisada Nishida's contributions to primatology
    John C Mitani
    Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Primates 47:2-5. 2006
  16. doi request reprint No evidence of short-term exchange of meat for sex among chimpanzees
    Ian C Gilby
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, USA
    J Hum Evol 59:44-53. 2010
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Skeletal pathology in Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii in Kibale National Park, Uganda
    Melinda L Carter
    Department of Anatomy, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Carbondale, IL, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 135:389-403. 2008
    ..Much of the major skeletal trauma in the Kibale skeletons was attributable to falls, although other pathologies were noted as well, including apparent injuries from snares, degenerative arthritis, and minor congenital abnormalities...
  18. ncbi request reprint Island rules cannot be broken
    Meike Kohler
    Trends Ecol Evol 23:6-7; author reply 8-9. 2008
  19. pmc Aging and fertility patterns in wild chimpanzees provide insights into the evolution of menopause
    Melissa Emery Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Curr Biol 17:2150-6. 2007
    ..Thus, in contrast to recent claims, we find no evidence that menopause is a typical characteristic of chimpanzee life histories...
  20. ncbi request reprint Climbing and the daily energy cost of locomotion in wild chimpanzees: implications for hominoid locomotor evolution
    Herman Pontzer
    50A Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 46:317-35. 2004
    ..These analyses are relevant to anatomical comparisons with living and extinct hominoids...
  21. ncbi request reprint Diet and reproductive function in wild female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Kibale National Park, Uganda
    Melissa Emery Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 135:171-81. 2008
    ..Chimpanzees appear to share with humans a reproductive system that is primed to respond to proximate levels of energy acquisition...
  22. ncbi request reprint SIVcpz in wild chimpanzees
    Mario L Santiago
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 6024, USA
    Science 295:465. 2002
  23. ncbi request reprint Male chimpanzees prefer mating with old females
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, Boston University, 232 Bay State Road, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA
    Curr Biol 16:2234-8. 2006
    ..Given that the human lineage evolved from a chimpanzee-like ancestor, they indicate that male preference for youth is a derived human feature, likely adapted from a tendency to form unusually long term mating bonds...
  24. ncbi request reprint Testosterone and energetics in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Am J Primatol 66:119-30. 2005
    ..They also suggest that short-term variations in T levels in male hominoids are more likely to be explained by social factors than by energetic ones...
  25. ncbi request reprint Cooking and grinding reduces the cost of meat digestion
    Scott M Boback
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 148:651-6. 2007
    ..4%. These results support the hypothesis that the consumption of cooked meat provides an energetic benefit over the consumption of raw meat...
  26. ncbi request reprint Hardness of cercopithecine foods: implications for the critical function of enamel thickness in exploiting fallback foods
    Joanna E Lambert
    Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 125:363-8. 2004
    ..albigena during this period. We suggest that it is the difference in the mechanical properties of fallback foods during critical periods that may have served as the selective pressure for thick enamel in L. albigena...
  27. pmc Foci of endemic simian immunodeficiency virus infection in wild-living eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)
    Mario L Santiago
    Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA
    J Virol 77:7545-62. 2003
    ..The basis for the wide variability in SIVcpz infection rates in east African apes and the important question of SIVcpz prevalence in west central African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) remain to be elucidated...
  28. ncbi request reprint Triterpenoid saponin anthranilates from Albizia grandibracteata leaves ingested by primates in Uganda
    Sabrina Krief
    Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie, FRE CNRS 2715, IFR 53 Biomolecules, Reims, France
    J Nat Prod 68:897-903. 2005
    ..This is the first report of such ester saponins in dicotyledonous plants. Studies of the primate diet may provide a useful method for finding naturally occurring compounds of medicinal significance...
  29. pmc Amplification of a complete simian immunodeficiency virus genome from fecal RNA of a wild chimpanzee
    Mario L Santiago
    Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA
    J Virol 77:2233-42. 2003
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Bioactive properties of plant species ingested by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in the Kibale National Park, Uganda
    Sabrina Krief
    ICSN, CNRS, Gif sur Yvette, France
    Am J Primatol 68:51-71. 2006
    ....
  31. pmc Identification of a hepatitis B virus genome in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthi) from East Africa indicates a wide geographical dispersion among equatorial African primates
    Jean Pierre Vartanian
    Unite de Retrovirologie Moleculaire, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
    J Virol 76:11155-8. 2002
    ..An entire hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was amplified and sequenced from samples taken from one animal. This indicates that HBV is distributed across the entire range of chimpanzee habitats...
  32. pmc The genetic signature of sex-biased migration in patrilocal chimpanzees and humans
    Kevin E Langergraber
    Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e973. 2007
    ..The chimpanzee data we present here thus provide a valuable comparative benchmark of the patterns of mtDNA and NRY variation to be expected in a society with extremely female-biased dispersal...
  33. ncbi request reprint Male chimpanzees exchange political support for mating opportunities
    Kimberly G Duffy
    Department of Anthropology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Curr Biol 17:R586-7. 2007
    ..Here we report that the highest-ranking (alpha) male in one well-studied community of chimpanzees rewarded his allies by allowing them preferential access to mates...