George M Whitesides

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The origins and the future of microfluidics
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
    Nature 442:368-73. 2006
  2. doi request reprint Fabrication of arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes by shadow evaporation
    Michael D Dickey
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Nano 2:800-8. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Patterning the tips of optical fibers with metallic nanostructures using nanoskiving
    Darren J Lipomi
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 11:632-6. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint Fabrication of large-area patterned nanostructures for optical applications by nanoskiving
    Qiaobing Xu
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 7:2800-5. 2007
  5. pmc Heterogeneous films of ionotropic hydrogels fabricated from delivery templates of patterned paper
    Paul J Bracher
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 1:1807-12. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Thread as a matrix for biomedical assays
    Meital Reches
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2:1722-8. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding
    Benjamin Breiten
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 135:15579-84. 2013
  8. pmc Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability
    Bryan F Shaw
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 132:17411-25. 2010
  9. pmc Measuring binding of protein to gel-bound ligands using magnetic levitation
    Nathan D Shapiro
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 134:5637-46. 2012
  10. pmc Dependence of avidity on linker length for a bivalent ligand-bivalent receptor model system
    Eric T Mack
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 134:333-45. 2012

Detail Information

Publications124 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi request reprint The origins and the future of microfluidics
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
    Nature 442:368-73. 2006
    ..The solutions to these problems will require imagination and ingenuity...
  2. doi request reprint Fabrication of arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes by shadow evaporation
    Michael D Dickey
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Nano 2:800-8. 2008
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Patterning the tips of optical fibers with metallic nanostructures using nanoskiving
    Darren J Lipomi
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 11:632-6. 2011
    ..Examples of structures transferred include gold crescents, rings, high-aspect-ratio concentric cylinders, and gratings of parallel nanowires...
  4. ncbi request reprint Fabrication of large-area patterned nanostructures for optical applications by nanoskiving
    Qiaobing Xu
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 7:2800-5. 2007
    ....
  5. pmc Heterogeneous films of ionotropic hydrogels fabricated from delivery templates of patterned paper
    Paul J Bracher
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 1:1807-12. 2009
    ..The heterogeneous hydrogel films can be used to culture bacteria in various 2-D designs. The pattern of toxic and nontoxic ions used to cross-link the polymer determines the pattern of viable colonies of Escherichia coli within the film...
  6. doi request reprint Thread as a matrix for biomedical assays
    Meital Reches
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2:1722-8. 2010
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding
    Benjamin Breiten
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 135:15579-84. 2013
    ....
  8. pmc Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability
    Bryan F Shaw
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 132:17411-25. 2010
    ..e., phosphorylation, acetylation, or the binding of the protein to an oligonucleotide or to another charged ligand or protein)...
  9. pmc Measuring binding of protein to gel-bound ligands using magnetic levitation
    Nathan D Shapiro
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 134:5637-46. 2012
    ..The design and synthesis of beads with improved characteristics (e.g., larger pore size) has the potential to resolve these problems...
  10. pmc Dependence of avidity on linker length for a bivalent ligand-bivalent receptor model system
    Eric T Mack
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 134:333-45. 2012
    ..002 pM and K(d)(mono)/K(d)(avidity) ~ 8 × 10(6) unitless)...
  11. pmc Thermodynamic parameters for the association of fluorinated benzenesulfonamides with bovine carbonic anhydrase II
    Vijay M Krishnamurthy
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Chem Asian J 2:94-105. 2007
    ..Calorimetry revealed that all of the ligands studied bind in a 1:1 stoichiometry with BCA; this result was confirmed by 19F NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography (for complexes with human carbonic anhydrase II)...
  12. ncbi request reprint Water-soluble sacrificial layers for surface micromachining
    Vincent Linder
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Small 1:730-6. 2005
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Quantifying colorimetric assays in paper-based microfluidic devices by measuring the transmission of light through paper
    Audrey K Ellerbee
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Anal Chem 81:8447-52. 2009
    ..This prototype transmittance colorimeter is inexpensive, rugged, and fully self-contained, and thus potentially attractive for use in resource-limited environments and developing countries...
  14. doi request reprint Replacing -CH2CH2- with -CONH- does not significantly change rates of charge transport through Ag(TS)-SAM//Ga2O3/EGaIn junctions
    Martin M Thuo
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 134:10876-84. 2012
    ..g., HS~CONH~R) using an amide-based coupling provide practical routes to molecules useful in studies of molecular electronics...
  15. ncbi request reprint Flowing lattices of bubbles as tunable, self-assembled diffraction gratings
    Michinao Hashimoto
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Small 2:1292-8. 2006
    ..For our devices, we achieved tunable ranges in pitch from 12 to 51 microm, corresponding to first-order diffraction angles from 3.2 degrees to 0.7 degrees for light with a wavelength of 632 nm...
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of surface charge on denaturation of bovine carbonic anhydrase
    Irina Gitlin
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Chembiochem 7:1241-50. 2006
    ....
  17. pmc Pathway for unfolding of ubiquitin in sodium dodecyl sulfate, studied by capillary electrophoresis
    Gregory F Schneider
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 130:17384-93. 2008
    ..This study sheds light on the formation of the enigmatic protein-SDS complexes formed during SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and brings a new tool to the study of proteins and detergents...
  18. pmc Increasing the net charge and decreasing the hydrophobicity of bovine carbonic anhydrase decreases the rate of denaturation with sodium dodecyl sulfate
    Katherine L Gudiksen
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Biophys J 91:298-310. 2006
    ..At the high numbers of acylations, hydrophobic interactions cause the hexanoyl-modified BCA to denature nearly three orders of magnitude more rapidly than the acetyl-modified BCA...
  19. pmc Mechanism of the hydrophobic effect in the biomolecular recognition of arylsulfonamides by carbonic anhydrase
    Phillip W Snyder
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:17889-94. 2011
    ..Hydrophobic effects in various contexts have different structural and thermodynamic origins, although all may be manifestations of the differences in characteristics of bulk water and water close to hydrophobic surfaces...
  20. doi request reprint The SAM, not the electrodes, dominates charge transport in metal-monolayer//Ga2O3/gallium-indium eutectic junctions
    William F Reus
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Nano 6:4806-22. 2012
    ....
  21. doi request reprint Nanoskiving: a new method to produce arrays of nanostructures
    Qiaobing Xu
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Acc Chem Res 41:1566-77. 2008
    ..This Account discusses a new fabrication method (nanoskiving) that produces arrays of metal nanostructures. The defining process in nanoskiving is cutting slabs from a polymeric matrix containing embedded, more extended metal structures...
  22. doi request reprint Millimeter-scale contact printing of aqueous solutions using a stamp made out of paper and tape
    Chao Min Cheng
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 10:3201-5. 2010
    ..By patterning the paper to which the transfer occurs using wax printing or an equivalent technique, accuracy increases substantially...
  23. ncbi request reprint Peracetylated bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA-Ac18) is kinetically more stable than native BCA to sodium dodecyl sulfate
    Irina Gitlin
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Phys Chem B 110:2372-7. 2006
    ..Because it is experimentally impractical to prove equilibrium, it is not possible to establish whether there is a difference in the thermodynamics of unfolding/refolding between BCA and BCA-Ac18...
  24. pmc Using ion channel-forming peptides to quantify protein-ligand interactions
    Michael Mayer
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 130:1453-65. 2008
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Controlling the kinetics of contact electrification with patterned surfaces
    Samuel W Thomas
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 131:8746-7. 2009
    ..More generally, these results show that our enhanced understanding of the ion-transfer mechanism of contact electrification enables the rational design of chemically tailored surfaces for functional electrets...
  26. pmc Denaturation of proteins by SDS and tetraalkylammonium dodecyl sulfates
    Andrew Lee
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Langmuir 27:11560-74. 2011
    ..These results suggest that the variation in the behavior of NR(4)(+)DS(-) with changes in R may be exploited in methods used to analyze and separate mixtures of proteins...
  27. pmc Fluoroalkyl and alkyl chains have similar hydrophobicities in binding to the "hydrophobic wall" of carbonic anhydrase
    Jasmin Mecinovic
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 133:14017-26. 2011
    ....
  28. pmc Cofabrication: a strategy for building multicomponent microsystems
    Adam C Siegel
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Acc Chem Res 43:518-28. 2010
    ....
  29. doi request reprint Programmable diagnostic devices made from paper and tape
    Andres W Martinez
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 10:2499-504. 2010
    ..They are the conceptual equivalent of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) widely used in electronics...
  30. ncbi request reprint Density-based diamagnetic separation: devices for detecting binding events and for collecting unlabeled diamagnetic particles in paramagnetic solutions
    Adam Winkleman
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Anal Chem 79:6542-50. 2007
    ..This device requires no power, has no moving parts, and may be suitable for use in resource-poor environments...
  31. pmc Magnetic levitation as a platform for competitive protein-ligand binding assays
    Nathan D Shapiro
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    Anal Chem 84:6166-72. 2012
    ..A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight greater than approximately 65 kDa...
  32. pmc Measuring markers of liver function using a micropatterned paper device designed for blood from a fingerstick
    Sarah J Vella
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    Anal Chem 84:2883-91. 2012
    ..This device illustrates a type of test useable for a range of assays in resource-poor settings...
  33. doi request reprint Structural transformation by electrodeposition on patterned substrates (STEPS): a new versatile nanofabrication method
    Philseok Kim
    School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachussets 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 12:527-33. 2012
    ..This research identifies solution-based deposition of conductive polymers as a new tool in nanofabrication and allows access to 3D architectures that were previously difficult to fabricate...
  34. pmc Aqueous multiphase systems of polymers and surfactants provide self-assembling step-gradients in density
    Charles R Mace
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 134:9094-7. 2012
    ..These results suggest that the stable, sharp step-gradients in density provided by MuPSs can enable new classes of fractionations and separations based on density...
  35. pmc A technique to transfer metallic nanoscale patterns to small and non-planar surfaces
    Elizabeth J Smythe
    School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Nano 3:59-65. 2009
    ..A distinguishing feature of this technique is the use of a thin, sacrificial film to strip and transfer metallic nanopatterns and its ability to directly transfer metallic structures produced by conventional lithography...
  36. pmc Dependence of effective molarity on linker length for an intramolecular protein-ligand system
    Vijay M Krishnamurthy
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 129:1312-20. 2007
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Fabrication of thin, metallic films along the sidewalls of a topographically patterned stamp and their application in charge printing
    Tingbing Cao
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Small 1:1191-5. 2005
  38. doi request reprint Integrated fabrication and magnetic positioning of metallic and polymeric nanowires embedded in thin epoxy slabs
    Darren J Lipomi
    Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    ACS Nano 3:3315-25. 2009
    ..Single-crystalline Au nanowires can be placed on glass wool fibers or on microfabricated polymeric waveguides, with which the nanowire can be addressed optically...
  39. pmc Using covalent dimers of human carbonic anhydrase II to model bivalency in immunoglobulins
    Eric T Mack
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 133:11701-15. 2011
    ..These observations indicate that the avidities of these bivalent proteins, and by inference the avidities of structurally similar bivalent proteins such as IgG, are unexpectedly insensitive to the structure of the linker connecting them...
  40. pmc Carbonic anhydrase as a model for biophysical and physical-organic studies of proteins and protein-ligand binding
    Vijay M Krishnamurthy
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Chem Rev 108:946-1051. 2008
  41. ncbi request reprint A general method for patterning gradients of biomolecules on surfaces using microfluidic networks
    Xingyu Jiang
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Anal Chem 77:2338-47. 2005
    ..In this procedure, the relative amount of each protein, at saturation on the surface, depends only on its concentration.)...
  42. pmc A non-chromatographic method for the purification of a bivalently active monoclonal IgG antibody from biological fluids
    Basar Bilgicer
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 131:9361-7. 2009
    ..It has the disadvantage that the structure of the hapten must be compatible with the synthesis of bi- and/or trivalent analogues...
  43. doi request reprint Rapid fabrication of pressure-driven open-channel microfluidic devices in omniphobic R(F) paper
    Ana C Glavan
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 13:2922-30. 2013
    ..The combination of omniphobic paper and a craft cutter enables the development of new types of valves and switches, such as "fold valves" and "porous switches," which provide new methods to control fluid flow. ..
  44. doi request reprint Filter-based assay for Escherichia coli in aqueous samples using bacteriophage-based amplification
    Ratmir Derda
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    Anal Chem 85:7213-20. 2013
    ..This method could potentially be extended to detect many different bacteria with bacteriophages that deliver genes encoding a full-length enzyme that is not natively expressed in the target bacteria. ..
  45. doi request reprint Paper-based electroanalytical devices with an integrated, stable reference electrode
    Wen Jie Lan
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 13:4103-8. 2013
    ..The cost of this portable device is sufficiently low that it could be for single-use, disposable applications, and its method of fabrication is compatible with that used for other paper-based systems. ..
  46. pmc Selective precipitation and purification of monovalent proteins using oligovalent ligands and ammonium sulfate
    Katherine A Mirica
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 23:293-9. 2012
    ....
  47. pmc Multigait soft robot
    Robert F Shepherd
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:20400-3. 2011
    ..A combination of crawling and undulation gaits allowed this robot to navigate a difficult obstacle. This demonstration illustrates an advantage of soft robotics: They are systems in which simple types of actuation produce complex motion...
  48. doi request reprint Using ratchets and sorters to fractionate motile cells of Escherichia coli by length
    S Elizabeth Hulme
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 8:1888-95. 2008
    ..8 microm (Coefficient of Variation, CV: 21%) at the entrance, to 3.4 microm (CV: 16%) after the first sorting junction, to 3.2 mum (CV: 19%) after the second sorting junction, to 3.0 mum (CV: 19%) after the third sorting junction...
  49. doi request reprint Formation of bubbles and droplets in parallel, coupled flow-focusing geometries
    Michinao Hashimoto
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Small 4:1795-805. 2008
    ..g., the gas or liquid), and on variations in pressure at the flow-focusing orifices induced by the breakup of bubbles or droplets...
  50. ncbi request reprint Eliminating positively charged lysine epsilon-NH3+ groups on the surface of carbonic anhydrase has no significant influence on its folding from sodium dodecyl sulfate
    Katherine L Gudiksen
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 127:4707-14. 2005
    ..This study reinforces the idea that charged residues on the surface of BCA do not guide protein folding and raises the broader question of why proteins have charged residues on their surface, outside of the region of the active site...
  51. pmc Core-shell and segmented polymer-metal composite nanostructures
    Michal Lahav
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 6:2166-71. 2006
    ..In the segmented structures, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioaniline nucleated the growth of PANI on top of metal nanorods and acted as an adhesion layer between the metal and PANI components...
  52. pmc Influence of fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon acyl groups at the surface of bovine carbonic anhydrase II on the kinetics of denaturation by sodium dodecyl sulfate
    Andrew Lee
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusettes 02138, USA
    J Phys Chem B 115:1199-210. 2011
    ..These results suggested that the hydrophobicity of CF(3)CONH- is slightly greater (by a factor of <2) than that of RHCONH- with similar surface area...
  53. pmc Fabrication of high-aspect-ratio metallic nanostructures using nanoskiving
    Qiaobing Xu
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nano Lett 6:2163-5. 2006
    ..The dimensions of the metal structures are determined by the thickness of the metal film and the thickness of the epoxy sections. The shape of the resulting nanostructure is defined by the cross section of the original template...
  54. pmc Designing ligands to bind proteins
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Q Rev Biophys 38:385-95. 2005
    ..The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging...
  55. doi request reprint Continuously tunable microdroplet-laser in a microfluidic channel
    Sindy K Y Tang
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Opt Express 19:2204-15. 2011
    ..This range of tunability in wavelengths was larger than that reported in previous work on droplet-based cavities...
  56. doi request reprint The binding of benzoarylsulfonamide ligands to human carbonic anhydrase is insensitive to formal fluorination of the ligand
    Matthew R Lockett
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 52:7714-7. 2013
    ..These data support the pervasive theory that the lock-and-key model disregards an important component of binding: the water, which fills the binding pocket of the protein and surrounds the ligand...
  57. pmc Complexes of native ubiquitin and dodecyl sulfate illustrate the nature of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the binding of proteins and surfactants
    Bryan F Shaw
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 133:17681-95. 2011
    ..This study establishes a few (of perhaps several) factors that control the simultaneous molecular recognition of multiple anionic amphiphiles by a folded cytosolic protein...
  58. pmc Lysine acetylation can generate highly charged enzymes with increased resistance toward irreversible inactivation
    Bryan F Shaw
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Protein Sci 17:1446-55. 2008
    ....
  59. doi request reprint Use of thin sectioning (nanoskiving) to fabricate nanostructures for electronic and optical applications
    Darren J Lipomi
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 50:8566-83. 2011
    ..Optical applications include surface plasmon resonators, plasmonic waveguides, and frequency-selective surfaces...
  60. doi request reprint Using magnetic levitation to distinguish atomic-level differences in chemical composition of polymers, and to monitor chemical reactions on solid supports
    Katherine A Mirica
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 130:17678-80. 2008
    ..The method is particularly useful for monitoring the kinetics of reactions occurring on polymer beads...
  61. doi request reprint Paper microzone plates
    Emanuel Carrilho
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Anal Chem 81:5990-8. 2009
    ..Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader...
  62. pmc Lifespan-on-a-chip: microfluidic chambers for performing lifelong observation of C. elegans
    S Elizabeth Hulme
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 10:589-97. 2010
    ..This ability to perform longitudinal measurements within the device enabled the identification of age-related phenotypic changes that correlate with lifespan in C. elegans...
  63. pmc Electrochemical sensing in paper-based microfluidic devices
    Zhihong Nie
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 10:477-83. 2010
    ..g., heavy-metal ions and glucose) in aqueous solutions. This low-cost analytical device should be useful for applications in public health, environmental monitoring, and the developing world...
  64. pmc Paper-supported 3D cell culture for tissue-based bioassays
    Ratmir Derda
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:18457-62. 2009
    ..Cell cultures in stacked, paper-supported gels offer a uniquely flexible approach to study cell responses to 3D molecular gradients and to mimic tissue- and organ-level functions...
  65. ncbi request reprint Nanoscience, nanotechnology, and chemistry
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Small 1:172-9. 2005
  66. ncbi request reprint Molecular engineering of surfaces using self-assembled monolayers
    George M Whitesides
    Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cambridge, MA 02138 2902, USA
    Sci Prog 88:17-48. 2005
    ..Understanding the principles by which they form, and connecting molecular-level structure with macroscopic properties, opens a wide range of areas to study and exploitation...
  67. doi request reprint Transistors formed from a single lithography step using information encoded in topography
    Michael D Dickey
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Small 6:2050-7. 2010
    ..The complexity of structures that can be fabricated using simple lithographic features distinguishes this procedure from other techniques based on shadow evaporation...
  68. doi request reprint The relative rates of thiol-thioester exchange and hydrolysis for alkyl and aryl thioalkanoates in water
    Paul J Bracher
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Orig Life Evol Biosph 41:399-412. 2011
    ....
  69. pmc Multizone paper platform for 3D cell cultures
    Ratmir Derda
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e18940. 2011
    ..This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures...
  70. doi request reprint Diagnostics for the developing world: microfluidic paper-based analytical devices
    Andres W Martinez
    Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Anal Chem 82:3-10. 2010
    ..To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.)...
  71. doi request reprint Chemistry and the worm: Caenorhabditis elegans as a platform for integrating chemical and biological research
    S Elizabeth Hulme
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 50:4774-807. 2011
    ..elegans that is chemically relevant. It also describes tools-biological, chemical, and physical-that are available to researchers studying the worm...
  72. pmc Controlling the orientation and synaptic differentiation of myotubes with micropatterned substrates
    Jacinthe Gingras
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Biophys J 97:2771-9. 2009
    ..Our results represent what we believe is a new approach for musculoskeletal tissue engineering, and our model sheds light on mechanisms of myotube alignment in vivo...
  73. pmc FLASH: a rapid method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices
    Andres W Martinez
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 8:2146-50. 2008
    ..FLASH provides a straightforward method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices in regions where the technological support for conventional photolithography is not available...
  74. pmc Cell encapsulation in sub-mm sized gel modules using replica molding
    Alison P McGuigan
    Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2258. 2008
    ....
  75. ncbi request reprint Why are proteins charged? Networks of charge-charge interactions in proteins measured by charge ladders and capillary electrophoresis
    Irina Gitlin
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 45:3022-60. 2006
    ..By studying the influence of charge on the properties of proteins using charge ladders, it is possible to estimate the net charge and hydrodynamic radius and to infer the role of charged residues in ligand binding and protein folding...
  76. ncbi request reprint Patterning multiple aligned self-assembled monolayers using light
    Declan Ryan
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Langmuir 20:9080-8. 2004
    ..The ability to produce multiple, aligned patterns of SAMs in a single step, without alignment of photomasks in separate steps, increases the versatility of SAMs for studying a range of physical phenomena...
  77. ncbi request reprint Combining microscience and neurobiology
    Douglas B Weibel
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 15:560-7. 2005
    ..The major impediment to the development of a field of 'microfabrication and measurement' in neuroscience is the absence of effective collaborative interactions between the communities of fabricators and neurobiologists...
  78. ncbi request reprint Self-assembled monolayers of thiolates on metals as a form of nanotechnology
    J Christopher Love
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Chem Rev 105:1103-69. 2005
  79. doi request reprint Fabrication of a modular tissue construct in a microfluidic chip
    Derek A Bruzewicz
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 8:663-71. 2008
    ..Recovery and analysis of modules after 24 h under constant flow of medium (200 microL h(-1)) showed that over 99% of encapsulated cells survived this interval in the microfluidic chamber...
  80. ncbi request reprint Cofabrication of electromagnets and microfluidic systems in poly(dimethylsiloxane)
    Adam C Siegel
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 45:6877-82. 2006
  81. ncbi request reprint Micropatterning tractional forces in living cells
    Ning Wang
    Physiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 52:97-106. 2002
    ....
  82. pmc Microfabricated teflon membranes for low-noise recordings of ion channels in planar lipid bilayers
    Michael Mayer
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Biophys J 85:2684-95. 2003
    ..The low-noise properties of bilayer recordings on micropores in Teflon AF films were exploited to record the smallest conductance state of alamethicin (24 pS) at an unprecedentedly high bandwidth of 10.7 kHz...
  83. ncbi request reprint Self-assembly at all scales
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Science 295:2418-21. 2002
    ..The concept of self-assembly is used increasingly in many disciplines, with a different flavor and emphasis in each...
  84. ncbi request reprint Assumptions: taking chemistry in new directions
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 2902, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 43:3632-41. 2004
  85. ncbi request reprint Mechanical anisotropy of adherent cells probed by a three-dimensional magnetic twisting device
    Shaohua Hu
    Physiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287:C1184-91. 2004
    ..Deformation patterns of the cytoskeleton and the nucleolus were sensitive to loading direction, suggesting anisotropic mechanical signaling. This technology may be useful for elucidating the structural basis of mechanotransduction...
  86. ncbi request reprint The 'right' size in nanobiotechnology
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 21:1161-5. 2003
    ....
  87. ncbi request reprint Electrostatic self-assembly of macroscopic crystals using contact electrification
    Bartosz A Grzybowski
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nat Mater 2:241-5. 2003
    ..We suggest that the stability of these unusual structures can be explained by accounting for the interactions between electric dipoles that the particles in the aggregates induce in their neighbours...
  88. pmc Beyond molecules: self-assembly of mesoscopic and macroscopic components
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:4769-74. 2002
    ..These larger systems also offer a level of control over the characteristics of the components and over the interactions among them that makes fundamental investigations especially tractable...
  89. ncbi request reprint Components for integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic systems
    Jessamine M K Ng
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Electrophoresis 23:3461-73. 2002
    ..Several components are described in detail: a passive chaotic mixer, pneumatically actuated switches and valves, a magnetic filter, functional membranes, and optical components...
  90. ncbi request reprint Chaotic mixer for microchannels
    Abraham D Stroock
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Science 295:647-51. 2002
    ..This method uses bas-relief structures on the floor of the channel that are easily fabricated with commonly used methods of planar lithography...
  91. pmc Swimming in circles: motion of bacteria near solid boundaries
    Eric Lauga
    Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Biophys J 90:400-12. 2006
    ..We compare the results of the model with experimental data and obtain reasonable agreement. In particular, the radius of curvature of the trajectory is observed to increase with the length of the bacterium body...
  92. ncbi request reprint Formation of droplets and bubbles in a microfluidic T-junction-scaling and mechanism of break-up
    Piotr Garstecki
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 6:437-46. 2006
    ....
  93. pmc Folding of electrostatically charged beads-on-a-string as an experimental realization of a theoretical model in polymer science
    Meital Reches
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:17644-9. 2009
    ....
  94. ncbi request reprint A microfluidic apparatus for the study of ice nucleation in supercooled water drops
    Claudiu A Stan
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 01238, USA
    Lab Chip 9:2293-305. 2009
    ..The dendritic growth of ice in 150-microm drops of supercooled water at -35 degrees C was observed and imaged at a rate of 16 000 frames/s...
  95. ncbi request reprint The force acting on a superparamagnetic bead due to an applied magnetic field
    Sergey S Shevkoplyas
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Lab Chip 7:1294-302. 2007
    ..The derivation of the force on a magnetic bead due to a magnetic field also identifies the correct treatment to use for this interaction, and resolves discrepancies present throughout the literature...
  96. ncbi request reprint Don't forget long-term fundamental research in energy
    George M Whitesides
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Science 315:796-8. 2007
    ....
  97. doi request reprint Rapid prototyping of microstructures by soft lithography for biotechnology
    Daniel B Wolfe
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 583:81-107. 2010
    ..Here we describe the procedures for fabricating microstructures with lateral dimensions as small as 1 mum. These types of microstructures are useful for microfluidic devices, cell-based assays, and bioengineered surfaces...
  98. ncbi request reprint Muscular thin films for building actuators and powering devices
    Adam W Feinberg
    Disease Biophysics Group, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Science 317:1366-70. 2007
    ..These centimeter-scale constructs perform functions as diverse as gripping, pumping, walking, and swimming with fine spatial and temporal control and generating specific forces as high as 4 millinewtons per square millimeter...
  99. ncbi request reprint Modeling the anodic half-cell of a low-temperature coal fuel cell
    Douglas B Weibel
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 44:5682-6. 2005
  100. pmc The paradoxical thermodynamic basis for the interaction of ethylene glycol, glycine, and sarcosine chains with bovine carbonic anhydrase II: an unexpected manifestation of enthalpy/entropy compensation
    Vijay M Krishnamurthy
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 128:5802-12. 2006
    ..Thus, this study demonstrates a surprising example of enthalpy/entropy compensation in a well-defined system. Understanding this compensation is integral to the rational design of high-affinity ligands for proteins...
  101. ncbi request reprint Electrochemical desorption of self-assembled monolayers noninvasively releases patterned cells from geometrical confinements
    Xingyu Jiang
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 125:2366-7. 2003
    ..This straightforward technique is useful in bioassays for drug screening and for fundamental studies in cell biology...