R Weissleder

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Novel peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") with high affinity for NIR fluorochromes allows protein and cell specific labeling for in vivo imaging
    Kimberly A Kelly
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e665. 2007
  2. pmc The neuropeptide neuromedin U promotes autoantibody-mediated arthritis
    Sindhuja M Rao
    Center for Immunology and Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Medical Biosciences Building, 2101 6th St SE Minneapolis, MN, 55414, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 14:R29. 2012
  3. pmc PepBank--a database of peptides based on sequence text mining and public peptide data sources
    Timur Shtatland
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Bldg, 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    BMC Bioinformatics 8:280. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of HIV protease activity in amplicon vector-transduced gliomas
    Khalid Shah
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 64:273-8. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging in cancer
    Ralph Weissleder
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Science 312:1168-71. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Scaling down imaging: molecular mapping of cancer in mice
    Ralph Weissleder
    Harvard Medical School, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129, USA
    Nat Rev Cancer 2:11-8. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Size optimization of synthetic graft copolymers for in vivo angiogenesis imaging
    R Weissleder
    The Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 12:213-9. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint [Molecular imaging--a new emphasis in radiology]
    R Weissleder
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Radiologe 47:6-7. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of tumors with protease-activated near-infrared fluorescent probes
    R Weissleder
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 17:375-8. 1999
  10. ncbi request reprint Cell-specific targeting of nanoparticles by multivalent attachment of small molecules
    Ralph Weissleder
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149, 13th Street, Room 5403, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 23:1418-23. 2005

Research Grants

  1. Integrated FMT approaches for biomolecular measurements
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2010
  2. Hybrid Complete Protection Flourescence Molecular Tomography and X-ray CT
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
  4. TRAINING GRANT IN MOLECULAR IMAGING RESEARCH
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
  5. Translational Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
  6. MR imaging of myeloperoxidase activity
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2006
  7. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2006
  8. MR imaging of myeloperoxidase activity
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2005
  9. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2005
  10. MR imaging of myeloperoxidase activity
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications124 found, 100 shown here

  1. pmc Novel peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") with high affinity for NIR fluorochromes allows protein and cell specific labeling for in vivo imaging
    Kimberly A Kelly
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e665. 2007
    ..Probes that allow site-specific protein labeling have become critical tools for visualizing biological processes...
  2. pmc The neuropeptide neuromedin U promotes autoantibody-mediated arthritis
    Sindhuja M Rao
    Center for Immunology and Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Medical Biosciences Building, 2101 6th St SE Minneapolis, MN, 55414, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 14:R29. 2012
    ..The primary goal of this study was to determine if NMU promotes autoantibody-induced arthritis. Additional studies addressed the cellular source of NMU and sought to define the NMU receptor responsible for its pro-inflammatory effects...
  3. pmc PepBank--a database of peptides based on sequence text mining and public peptide data sources
    Timur Shtatland
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Bldg, 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    BMC Bioinformatics 8:280. 2007
    ..Rather, peptide sequences still have to be mined from abstracts and full-length articles, and/or obtained from the fragmented public sources...
  4. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of HIV protease activity in amplicon vector-transduced gliomas
    Khalid Shah
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 64:273-8. 2004
    ..These findings may be directly applicable in using viral protease expression as a transgene marker in tumor therapy and may have implications in testing the efficacy of HIV-1PR inhibitors in vivo...
  5. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging in cancer
    Ralph Weissleder
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Science 312:1168-71. 2006
    ..This information is expected to have a major impact on cancer detection, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how cancer arises...
  6. ncbi request reprint Scaling down imaging: molecular mapping of cancer in mice
    Ralph Weissleder
    Harvard Medical School, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129, USA
    Nat Rev Cancer 2:11-8. 2002
    ..If these techniques prove effective in mice, they might be translated into the clinic in the future, where they could be used to non-invasively detect and monitor treatment of human cancers...
  7. ncbi request reprint Size optimization of synthetic graft copolymers for in vivo angiogenesis imaging
    R Weissleder
    The Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 12:213-9. 2001
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint [Molecular imaging--a new emphasis in radiology]
    R Weissleder
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Radiologe 47:6-7. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of tumors with protease-activated near-infrared fluorescent probes
    R Weissleder
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 17:375-8. 1999
    ..In vivo imaging showed a 12-fold increase in NIRF signal, allowing the detection of tumors with submillimeter-sized diameters. This strategy can be used to detect such early stage tumors in vivo and to probe for specific enzyme activity...
  10. ncbi request reprint Cell-specific targeting of nanoparticles by multivalent attachment of small molecules
    Ralph Weissleder
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149, 13th Street, Room 5403, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 23:1418-23. 2005
    ..The method and described materials could facilitate development of functional nanomaterials for applications such as differentiating cell lines, detecting distinct cellular states and targeting specific cell types...
  11. pmc 18F-4V for PET-CT imaging of VCAM-1 expression in atherosclerosis
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02124, USA
    JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2:1213-22. 2009
    ....
  12. pmc Cellular activation of the self-quenched fluorescent reporter probe in tumor microenvironment
    Alexei A Bogdanov
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neoplasia 4:228-36. 2002
    ....
  13. pmc MRI of transgene expression: correlation to therapeutic gene expression
    Tomotsugu Ichikawa
    Neurosurgical Service and Molecular Neuro Oncology Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Neoplasia 4:523-30. 2002
    ..These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression...
  14. ncbi request reprint Catheter-based in vivo imaging of enzyme activity and gene expression: feasibility study in mice
    Martin A Funovics
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 13th Street, Bldg 149, Rm 5408, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Radiology 231:659-66. 2004
    ..To construct and evaluate an interventional catheter-based imaging system for intravital monitoring of molecularly sensitive near-infrared fluorescent probes and optical marker genes...
  15. pmc Bone marrow-derived lin(-)c-kit(+)Sca-1+ stem cells do not contribute to vasculogenesis in Lewis lung carcinoma
    Vivek R Shinde Patil
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neoplasia 7:234-40. 2005
    ..Furthermore, our results support the hypothesis that new vessel formation in carcinomas occurs primarily through endothelialization from adjacent and preexisting vasculature...
  16. ncbi request reprint Quantitative analysis of chemotherapeutic effects in tumors using in vivo staining and correlative histology
    Heung Kook Choi
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Cell Oncol 27:183-90. 2005
    ..To microscopically analyze the chemotherapeutic response of tumors using in vivo staining based on an annexinV-Cy5.5 probe and independently asses their apoptotic count using quantitative histological analysis...
  17. pmc Arthritis imaging using a near-infrared fluorescence folate-targeted probe
    Wei Tsung Chen
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 7:R310-7. 2005
    ..This receptor-targeted imaging method may facilitate improved arthritis diagnosis and early assessment of the disease progress by providing an in vivo characterization of active macrophage status in inflammatory joint diseases...
  18. ncbi request reprint Targeted imaging of human endothelial-specific marker in a model of adoptive cell transfer
    Hye Won Kang
    Department of Radiology, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, USA
    Lab Invest 86:599-609. 2006
    ....
  19. pmc Rapid detection and profiling of cancer cells in fine-needle aspirates
    Hakho Lee
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, CPZN 5206, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:12459-64. 2009
    ..We detected as few as 2 cancer cells in 1-microL sample volumes of unprocessed fine-needle aspirates of tumors and profiled the expression of several cellular markers in <15 min...
  20. ncbi request reprint Simultaneous fluorescence imaging of protease expression and vascularity during murine colonoscopy for colonic lesion characterization
    Martin A Funovics
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Gastrointest Endosc 64:589-97. 2006
    ..Molecularly targeted fluorescent probes are currently being developed to improve the endoscopic detection of intestinal pathologic conditions...
  21. ncbi request reprint Multiparameter noninvasive assessment of treatment susceptibility, drug target inhibition and tumor response guides cancer treatment
    Michael S Gee
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Int J Cancer 121:2492-500. 2007
    ..This multiparametric imaging approach has great potential in the clinical setting for determining patient eligibility, adequate drug dosing and early biological response of molecularly-targeted cancer therapies...
  22. ncbi request reprint In vivo molecular target assessment of matrix metalloproteinase inhibition
    C Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 7:743-8. 2001
    ..The developed probes, together with novel near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology will enable the detailed analysis of a number of proteinases critical for advancing the therapeutic use of clinical proteinase inhibitors...
  23. pmc Early photon tomography allows fluorescence detection of lung carcinomas and disease progression in mice in vivo
    Mark J Niedre
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:19126-31. 2008
    ..The imaging fidelity demonstrated underscores a method that can use a wide range of fluorescent probes to accurately visualize cellular- and molecular-level events in whole animals in vivo...
  24. ncbi request reprint Detection of vascular adhesion molecule-1 expression using a novel multimodal nanoparticle
    Kimberly A Kelly
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Circ Res 96:327-36. 2005
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of factor XIIIa activity in thrombosis using a novel, near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent that covalently links to thrombi
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, USA
    Circulation 110:170-6. 2004
    ..In vivo imaging of FXIIIa activity could further elucidate the role of this molecule in thrombosis and other biological processes and aid in the clinical detection of acute thrombi...
  26. ncbi request reprint Multimodality molecular imaging identifies proteolytic and osteogenic activities in early aortic valve disease
    Elena Aikawa
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Mass 02129, USA
    Circulation 115:377-86. 2007
    ..Visualizing early changes in valvular cell functions in vivo may predict the future risk and identify therapeutic targets for prevention of aortic valve stenosis...
  27. ncbi request reprint Magnetic relaxation switches capable of sensing molecular interactions
    J Manuel Perez
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02129
    Nat Biotechnol 20:816-20. 2002
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of gene and cell therapies
    J R Allport
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Exp Hematol 29:1237-46. 2001
    ..In the future, specific imaging of disease targets will allow earlier detection and characterization of disease, as well as earlier and direct molecular assessment of treatment efficacy...
  29. pmc Human stem cells expressing novel TSP-1 variant have anti-angiogenic effect on brain tumors
    M Van Eekelen
    Molecular Neurotherapy and Imaging Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Oncogene 29:3185-95. 2010
    ..We also show that therapeutic hNSC do not proliferate and remain in an un-differentiated state in the brains of glioma-bearing mice. This study provides a platform for accelerated development of future cell-based therapies for cancer...
  30. ncbi request reprint Optical visualization of cathepsin K activity in atherosclerosis with a novel, protease-activatable fluorescence sensor
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Circulation 115:2292-8. 2007
    ..To assess better the biology of CatK activity in vivo, we developed a novel near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe for imaging of CatK and evaluated it in mouse and human atherosclerosis...
  31. ncbi request reprint Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of tumor apoptosis
    Alexander Petrovsky
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 63:1936-42. 2003
    ....
  32. pmc Nanoparticle imaging of integrins on tumor cells
    Xavier Montet
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neoplasia 8:214-22. 2006
    ....
  33. pmc A near-infrared cell tracker reagent for multiscopic in vivo imaging and quantification of leukocyte immune responses
    Filip K Swirski
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, United States of America fswirski mgh harvard edu
    PLoS ONE 2:e1075. 2007
    ..Thus, this approach is suitable to monitor cells at multiple resolutions in real time in their native environments by NIR-based fluorescence imaging...
  34. pmc Monocyte subset dynamics in human atherosclerosis can be profiled with magnetic nano-sensors
    Moritz Wildgruber
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e5663. 2009
    ....
  35. ncbi request reprint A long-circulating co-polymer in "passive targeting" to solid tumors
    A Bogdanov
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129, USA
    J Drug Target 4:321-30. 1997
    ..The co-polymer non-covalently associated with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), showed a cytostatic effect against mouse F9 carcinoma, and induced a reversal in tumor growth after intravenous administration...
  36. ncbi request reprint [Progress in optical imaging]
    C Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
    Radiologe 41:131-7. 2001
    ..This overview outlines the basic principles of optical imaging and summarizes the current state of the art...
  37. ncbi request reprint Primary liver tumors: diagnosis by MR imaging
    E Rummeny
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114
    AJR Am J Roentgenol 152:63-72. 1989
    ..However, the combined use of T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo and T2-weighted phase-contrast images had the advantage of distinguishing benign from malignant primary liver tumors in 48 of 55 patients in this series...
  38. pmc Volumetric tomography of fluorescent proteins through small animals in vivo
    Giannis Zacharakis
    Laboratory for Bio optics and Molecular Imaging, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:18252-7. 2005
    ..This technology can significantly improve imaging capacity over the current state of the art and should find wide in vivo imaging applications in drug discovery, immunology, and cancer research...
  39. ncbi request reprint Tomographic fluorescence mapping of tumor targets
    Xavier Montet
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Cancer Res 65:6330-6. 2005
    ..FMT measurements can be done serially, with short imaging times and within the same live animal. The described method should be valuable for rapidly profiling biological phenomena in vivo...
  40. ncbi request reprint Surface-functionalized nanoparticle library yields probes for apoptotic cells
    Eyk A Schellenberger
    Harvard Medical School, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Building 149, 13th Street, 5403, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 5:275-9. 2004
    ....
  41. pmc Optical imaging of apoptosis as a biomarker of tumor response to chemotherapy
    Eyk A Schellenberger
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neoplasia 5:187-92. 2003
    ..The method maybe used to image pharmacologic responses in other animal models and, potentially, may permit the clinical imaging of apoptosis with noninvasive or minimally invasive instrumentation...
  42. ncbi request reprint Shedding light onto live molecular targets
    Ralph Weissleder
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 9:123-8. 2003
  43. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of proteolytic activity in atherosclerosis
    Jiqiu Chen
    Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
    Circulation 105:2766-71. 2002
    ..On the basis of the hypothesis that the inflammatory response and proteolysis lead to plaque rupture, we have examined the role of cathepsin B as a model proteolytic enzyme...
  44. ncbi request reprint MicroRNA-21 knockdown disrupts glioma growth in vivo and displays synergistic cytotoxicity with neural precursor cell delivered S-TRAIL in human gliomas
    Maarten F Corsten
    Center for Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 67:8994-9000. 2007
    ..Furthermore, our findings provide the basis for developing combination therapies using miRNA modulation and cytotoxic tumor therapies...
  45. ncbi request reprint Dual channel optical tomographic imaging of leukocyte recruitment and protease activity in the healing myocardial infarct
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
    Circ Res 100:1218-25. 2007
    ..Spectrally resolved imaging agents allow for simultaneous assesment of key processes of in vivo cellular functions. Specifically, we show that in vivo FMT detects impaired healing in FXIII-/- mice...
  46. ncbi request reprint DNA binding chelates for nonviral gene delivery imaging
    A Bogdanov
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Gene Ther 8:515-22. 2001
    ..This result correlated with a higher expression of marker mRNA and green fluorescent protein as determined using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively...
  47. pmc Molecular imaging of macrophage protease activity in cardiovascular inflammation in vivo
    T Quillard
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Thromb Haemost 105:828-36. 2011
    ..Imaging of macrophages and protease activity should provide an important adjunct to understanding pathophysiology in vivo, evaluating the effects of interventions, and ultimately aiding clinical care...
  48. pmc Near-infrared fluorescent probe for imaging of pancreatic beta cells
    Thomas Reiner
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 21:1362-8. 2010
    ..Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 min and peak fluorescence within 20 min of injection), making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging...
  49. pmc Pioglitazone suppresses inflammation in vivo in murine carotid atherosclerosis: novel detection by dual-target fluorescence molecular imaging
    Kiyuk Chang
    Cardiovascular Research Center and the Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass 02114, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 30:1933-9. 2010
    ..To investigate the effects of pioglitazone (PIO), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, on plaque matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and macrophage (Mac) responses in vivo in a molecular imaging study...
  50. pmc High-resolution imaging of murine myocardial infarction with delayed-enhancement cine micro-CT
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 292:H3172-8. 2007
    ..This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell-based interventions in murine models...
  51. pmc Hybrid in vivo FMT-CT imaging of protease activity in atherosclerosis with customized nanosensors
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 29:1444-51. 2009
    ....
  52. pmc miR-296 regulates growth factor receptor overexpression in angiogenic endothelial cells
    Thomas Wurdinger
    Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Neuroscience Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Cancer Cell 14:382-93. 2008
    ..Furthermore, inhibition of miR-296 with antagomirs reduces angiogenesis in tumor xenografts in vivo...
  53. ncbi request reprint Visualizing the dynamics of EGFR activity and antiglioma therapies in vivo
    Esther Arwert
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 67:7335-42. 2007
    ..This study serves as a template to follow the role of growth factor receptor expression in tumor progression and to image therapeutic efficacy of targeted therapies in cancer...
  54. pmc Improved detection of ovarian cancer metastases by intraoperative quantitative fluorescence protease imaging in a pre-clinical model
    Rahul Anil Sheth
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Simches 8226, 185 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Gynecol Oncol 112:616-22. 2009
    ....
  55. ncbi request reprint Normalized transillumination of fluorescent proteins in small animals
    Giannis Zacharakis
    Harvard Medical School, MA, USA
    Mol Imaging 5:153-9. 2006
    ..Due to the balance achieved between simplicity and accuracy, normalized transillumination approaches could serve as an important alternative molecular imaging method...
  56. pmc 18F labeled nanoparticles for in vivo PET-CT imaging
    Neal K Devaraj
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Simches Research Building, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 20:397-401. 2009
    ..The presence of 18F dramatically lowers the detection threshold of the nanoparticles, while the facile conjugation chemistry provides a simple platform for rapid and efficient nanoparticle labeling...
  57. ncbi request reprint Inflammation in atherosclerosis: visualizing matrix metalloproteinase action in macrophages in vivo
    Jun o Deguchi
    Donald W Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circulation 114:55-62. 2006
    ..Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques may contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling and the onset of acute thrombotic complications...
  58. ncbi request reprint In vivo phage display selection yields atherosclerotic plaque targeted peptides for imaging
    Kimberly A Kelly
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149, 13th Street, Rm 5404, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 8:201-7. 2006
    ..Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world, yet specific imaging agents to detect and map inflammatory plaques are still lacking...
  59. pmc The healing myocardium sequentially mobilizes two monocyte subsets with divergent and complementary functions
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Exp Med 204:3037-47. 2007
    ....
  60. pmc Genetically engineered T cells to target EGFRvIII expressing glioblastoma
    Szofia S Bullain
    Neurosurgical Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    J Neurooncol 94:373-82. 2009
    ..Successful targeting of EGFRvIII-positive tumors via adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells may represent a new immunotherapy strategy with great potential for clinical applications...
  61. ncbi request reprint Metabolic biotinylation of cell surface receptors for in vivo imaging
    Bakhos A Tannous
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital East, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Methods 3:391-6. 2006
    ..This BAP-TM allows noninvasive real-time imaging of any cell type transduced to express this reporter protein in culture or in vivo...
  62. ncbi request reprint Murine B16 melanomas expressing high levels of the chemokine stromal-derived factor-1/CXCL12 induce tumor-specific T cell chemorepulsion and escape from immune control
    Fabrizio Vianello
    Partners AIDS Research Center, Infectious Diseases Division, and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Immunol 176:2902-14. 2006
    ..The repulsion of tumor Ag-specific T cells away from melanomas expressing CXCL12 confirms the chemorepellent activity of high concentrations of CXCL12 and may represent a novel mechanism by which certain tumors evade the immune system...
  63. pmc Fluorescent nanoparticle uptake for brain tumor visualization
    Rachel Tréhin
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neoplasia 8:302-11. 2006
    ....
  64. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of activated endothelium using an anti-VCAM-1 magnetooptical probe
    Andrew Tsourkas
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 2060, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 16:576-81. 2005
    ..In contrast, nontargeted nanoparticles did not exhibit any specific labeling of the endothelium. These studies suggest that the developed nanoparticle would be useful for MR and optical detection of activated endothelium...
  65. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of thrombin activity in experimental thrombi with thrombin-sensitive near-infrared molecular probe
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown 02129, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 22:1929-35. 2002
    ..In this study, we investigated the ability of a novel thrombin-activatable molecular probe to provide in vivo images of thrombin activity in experimental thrombi...
  66. ncbi request reprint Ratio imaging of enzyme activity using dual wavelength optical reporters
    Moritz F Kircher
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149 13th Street 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129 2060, USA
    Mol Imaging 1:89-95. 2002
    ..Dual wavelength ratio imaging can be used for the quantitative imaging of a variety of enzymes in clinically important settings, while the magnetic properties of the probes allow their detection by MR imaging...
  67. ncbi request reprint In vivo tracking of neural progenitor cell migration to glioblastomas
    Yi Tang
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Hum Gene Ther 14:1247-54. 2003
    ..These results confirm the migratory capability of NPCs over considerable distances and their preferential accumulation in brain tumors on CNS rather than peripheral injection...
  68. ncbi request reprint Crosslinked iron oxides (CLIO): a new platform for the development of targeted MR contrast agents
    Patrick Wunderbaldinger
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Acad Radiol 9:S304-6. 2002
  69. ncbi request reprint Epidermal growth factor receptor and Ink4a/Arf: convergent mechanisms governing terminal differentiation and transformation along the neural stem cell to astrocyte axis
    Robert M Bachoo
    Center for Neuro Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Cancer Cell 1:269-77. 2002
    ..These data support the view that dysregulation of specific genetic pathways, rather than cell-of-origin, dictates the emergence and phenotype of high-grade gliomas...
  70. pmc Systemic distribution and tumor localization of adoptively transferred lymphocytes in mice: comparison with physiologically based pharmacokinetic model
    Robert J Melder
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA
    Neoplasia 4:3-8. 2002
    ..A physiologically based compartmental model of lymphocyte distribution predicted the compartmental sequestration and identified model parameters critical for experimental planning and therapeutic optimization...
  71. ncbi request reprint Imaging of stem cell recruitment to ischemic infarcts in a murine model
    Dong Eog Kim
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Mass, USA
    Stroke 35:952-7. 2004
    ..There is a need for imaging tools to study the in vivo migratory behavior of these cells...
  72. ncbi request reprint Imaging of tumour neovasculature by targeting the TGF-beta binding receptor endoglin
    S Bredow
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, 149, 13th Street, 5416, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Eur J Cancer 36:675-81. 2000
    ..Imaging of abundantly expressed endothelial targets circumvents delivery barriers normally associated with other tumour targeting strategies, and can potentially be used to quantitate molecular angiogenic markers...
  73. ncbi request reprint Preparation of a cathepsin D sensitive near-infrared fluorescence probe for imaging
    C H Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 2060, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 10:892-6. 1999
    ..This sequence but not a scrambled control sequence showed enzyme specificity in vitro. We conclude that activatable NIRF optical probes can be synthesized to potentially probe for specific enzymes in living organisms...
  74. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of gene therapy for cancer
    K Shah
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Gene Ther 11:1175-87. 2004
    ..This review provides descriptions of modalities applicable to imaging different parameters of vector-mediated gene expression in tumors and stem cell tracking in vivo...
  75. ncbi request reprint SPARC is a VCAM-1 counter-ligand that mediates leukocyte transmigration
    Kimberly A Kelly
    Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 81:748-56. 2007
    ..These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms of transendothelial leukocyte migration and suggest a potential, targetable interaction for therapeutic intervention...
  76. ncbi request reprint Tomographic fluorescence imaging of tumor vascular volume in mice
    Xavier Montet
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th St, Room 5403, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiology 242:751-8. 2007
    ..To prospectively determine the feasibility of imaging vascular volume fraction (VVF) and its therapeutic inhibition in mouse models of cancer with three-dimensional fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)...
  77. pmc Molecular imaging of innate immune cell function in transplant rejection
    Thomas Christen
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circulation 119:1925-32. 2009
    ..Yet, which macrophage functions may provide useful markers for detecting parenchymal rejection remains uncertain...
  78. pmc Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent cholangiography (NIRFC) in mouse models of bile duct injury
    Jose Luiz Figueiredo
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    World J Surg 34:336-43. 2010
    ....
  79. ncbi request reprint Use of magnetic nanoparticles as nanosensors to probe for molecular interactions
    J Manuel Perez
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th Street, 5404, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 5:261-4. 2004
    ..These magnetic nanosensors have been designed to detect specific mRNA, proteins, enzymatic activity, and pathogens (e.g., virus) with sensitivity in the low femtomole range (0.5-30 fmol)...
  80. ncbi request reprint Fluorescent protein tomography scanner for small animal imaging
    Giannis Zacharakis
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    IEEE Trans Med Imaging 24:878-85. 2005
    ..We conclude that the method could be applied in tomographic imaging of fluorescent proteins for in vivo targeting of different diseases and abnormalities...
  81. ncbi request reprint Treatment of schwannomas with an oncolytic recombinant herpes simplex virus in murine models of neurofibromatosis type 2
    Shanta M Messerli
    Molecular Neurogenetics Unit, Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Hum Gene Ther 17:20-30. 2006
    ....
  82. ncbi request reprint A dual fluorochrome probe for imaging proteases
    Moritz F Kircher
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 15:242-8. 2004
    ..5 to Cy7 fluorescence obtained was constant and independent of lesion size and depth. The dual fluorochrome probe, and related dual wavelength imaging method, represents a novel approach for imaging protease activity in vivo...
  83. pmc Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of matrix metalloproteinase activity after myocardial infarction
    Jiqiu Chen
    Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Mass 02129, USA
    Circulation 111:1800-5. 2005
    ..We used a molecular probe activated by protease cleavage to image expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart after myocardial infarction...
  84. ncbi request reprint Measurement of tumor interstitial volume fraction: method and implication for drug delivery
    Y R Kim
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown 02129 2060, USA
    Magn Reson Med 52:485-94. 2004
    ..5 +/- 9.1% and 15.9 +/- 0.7%, respectively (P < 0.05)), while only a minor difference was found for the absolute blood volumes (Abs_BV) (Kim et al. Magn Reson Med 2002;47:1110-1120) of these tissues...
  85. ncbi request reprint MRI contrast agents for evaluating focal hepatic lesions
    M G Harisinghani
    Department of Abdominal Imaging and Intervention, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Clin Radiol 56:714-25. 2001
    ..The purpose of this pictorial review is to briefly summarize the properties of various MRI contrast agents used in hepatic imaging and to highlight their role in evaluation of focal hepatic lesions...
  86. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging
    R Weissleder
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149, Rm 5403, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiology 219:316-33. 2001
    ..In the future, specific imaging of such targets will allow earlier detection and characterization of disease, earlier and direct molecular assessment of treatment effects, and a more fundamental understanding of the disease process...
  87. ncbi request reprint Targeting of MPEG-protected polyamino acid carrier to human E-selectin in vitro
    H W Kang
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Amino Acids 23:301-8. 2002
    ..Both PGC-based targeted agents demonstrated high binding specificity (20-30 fold over non-specific uptake) and were utilized for imaging E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells activated with IL-1 beta...
  88. ncbi request reprint Human transferrin receptor gene as a marker gene for MR imaging
    A Moore
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149, 13th St, Rm 5419, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiology 221:244-50. 2001
    ..To quantitate and characterize the expression of an engineered human transferrin receptor (ETR) as a marker gene by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging...
  89. ncbi request reprint [Imaging of angiogenesis]
    C Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
    Radiologe 41:138-45. 2001
    ..This article intends to provide a brief overview of imaging strategies for angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic treatment...
  90. ncbi request reprint Optical imaging of matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity in tumors: feasibility study in a mouse model
    C Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Bldg 149, 13th St, Rm 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiology 221:523-9. 2001
    ..CONCLUSION: It is feasible to image MMP-2 enzyme activity in vivo by using near-infrared optical imaging technology and "smart" matrix metalloproteinase-sensitive probes...
  91. ncbi request reprint [Molecular imaging in magnetic resonance tomography and nuclear medicine]
    D Högemann
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Building 149, 13th Street, 5403 Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiologe 41:116-20. 2001
    ..This short review reports some of the various ongoing research projects that address this problem and provide some very promising approaches...
  92. ncbi request reprint Non-invasive imaging of osteoclast activity via near-infrared cathepsin-K activatable optical probe
    K M Kozloff
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact 6:353. 2006
  93. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of gene expression:
    C Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown 02129, USA
    Acad Radiol 8:15-23. 2001
    ..While endeavors are under way to image targets ranging from DNA to entire phenotypes in vivo, this short review focuses on in vivo imaging of gene expression with magnetic resonance and optical techniques...
  94. pmc Block matching 3D random noise filtering for absorption optical projection tomography
    P Fumene Feruglio
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Phys Med Biol 55:5401-15. 2010
    ....
  95. ncbi request reprint The development of in vivo imaging systems to study gene expression
    A Bogdanov
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129, USA
    Trends Biotechnol 16:5-10. 1998
    ..In this review, we discuss nuclear-and magnetic-resonance-image techniques that have been developed to detect gene expression...
  96. ncbi request reprint Magnetic resonance imaging of liver tumors
    R Weissleder
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114
    Semin Ultrasound CT MR 10:63-77. 1989
    ..Therefore, as hardware and software evolve, it is necessary to retrace the steps of pulse sequence optimization and clinical testing. Hopefully, in the future, standardized imaging techniques will become available for body MRI...
  97. ncbi request reprint [Advances in cardiovascular medicine through molecular imaging]
    M Nahrendorf
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Rm 5406, 149 13th St, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiologe 47:18-24. 2007
    ..In our review we describe selected molecular imaging strategies in atherosclerosis, myocardial ischemia and healing...
  98. pmc On-chip bioorthogonal chemistry enables immobilization of in situ modified nanoparticles and small molecules for label-free monitoring of protein binding and reaction kinetics
    C Tassa
    Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Lab Chip 12:3103-10. 2012
    ..g., stopped flow kinetics). Taken together, this approach constitutes a flexible and powerful technique for evaluating a wide variety of reactions and intermolecular interactions for in vitro or in vivo applications...
  99. ncbi request reprint [Experimental and clinical approaches to lymph node imaging]
    P Wunderbaldinger
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Radiologe 41:121-30. 2001
    ..This brief overview is intended to summarize current imaging strategies and to give an outlook on experimental and clinical strategies in lymph node imaging in cancer...
  100. ncbi request reprint Cerebrovascular dynamics of autoregulation and hypoperfusion. An MRI study of CBF and changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume during hemorrhagic hypotension
    G Zaharchuk
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Stroke 30:2197-204; discussion 2204-5. 1999
    ..To determine how cerebral blood flow (CBF), total and microvascular cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast change during autoregulation and hypotension using hemodynamic MRI...
  101. ncbi request reprint Splenic imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-7227): preliminary observations
    M G Harisinghani
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    J Comput Assist Tomogr 25:770-6. 2001
    ..The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ferumoxtran-10-enhanced MRI in evaluating focal splenic lesions...

Research Grants42

  1. Integrated FMT approaches for biomolecular measurements
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  2. Hybrid Complete Protection Flourescence Molecular Tomography and X-ray CT
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..We hypothesize that the proposed developments will yield a practical and highly efficient system that can become a method of choice in many preclinical studies involving in-vivo imaging of entire animals. ..
  3. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In Specific Aim 2 we will apply the MRSW methodology to key issues of cancer biology (telomerase and telomere length), microbiology (virus detection and characterization), and panomics. ..
  4. TRAINING GRANT IN MOLECULAR IMAGING RESEARCH
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  5. Translational Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..It is anticipated that these advances in nanotechnology will significantly advance medical science and treatment of HLBS disorders. ..
  6. MR imaging of myeloperoxidase activity
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The ultimate goal of this research is to develop clinically useful imaging tools for the molecular assessment of atherosclerosis in vivo, which are currently limited. ..
  7. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..In Specific Aim 2 we will apply the MRSW methodology to key issues of cancer biology (telomerase and telomere length), microbiology (virus detection and characterization), and panomics. ..
  8. MR imaging of myeloperoxidase activity
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..The ultimate goal of this research is to develop clinically useful imaging tools for the molecular assessment of atherosclerosis in vivo, which are currently limited. ..
  9. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In Specific Aim 2 we will apply the MRSW methodology to key issues of cancer biology (telomerase and telomere length), microbiology (virus detection and characterization), and panomics. ..
  10. MR imaging of myeloperoxidase activity
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The ultimate goal of this research is to develop clinically useful imaging tools for the molecular assessment of atherosclerosis in vivo, which are currently limited. ..
  11. Center for Molecular Imaging Research at MGH/HMS
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..This established Center has a proven track record for innovation in molecular imaging and clinical translation and is poised to attack fundamental issues in cancer through the use of new technologies. ..
  12. Fast dienophile reactions for in vivo click imaging
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The new method is very powerful as it harnesses very selective and specific chemistries and amplification strategies and has most recently been shown to work for intracellular targets as well. ..
  13. Chip NMR biosensor for molecular analysis of cells
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: We are developing a handheld sensor to quickly assay blood and tissue samples in cancer patients. Based on fundamentally new designs, this technology allows sensing and rapid profiling of cancer cells in blood. ..
  14. Chip NMR biosensor for molecular analysis of cells
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Based on fundamentally new designs, this technology allows sensing and rapid profiling of cancer cells in blood. ..
  15. Chip NMR biosensor for molecular analysis of cells
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Based on fundamentally new designs, this technology allows sensing and rapid profiling of cancer cells in blood. ..
  16. Hybrid Complete Protection Flourescence Molecular Tomography and X-ray CT
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..We hypothesize that the proposed developments will yield a practical and highly efficient system that can become a method of choice in many preclinical studies involving in-vivo imaging of entire animals. ..
  17. Diffuse optical tomography system for molecular imaging
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  18. Magnetic nanoswitches for sensing biomolecules
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..In Specific Aim 2 we will apply the MRSW methodology to key issues of cancer biology (telomerase and telomere length), microbiology (virus detection and characterization), and panomics. ..
  19. MR IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..The long-term goal of this research is to extend the capabilities of MR and apply it to in vivo imaging of gene expression. ..
  20. LCDIO FOR LYMPH NODE MR IMAGING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..abstract_text> ..
  21. MR IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..The long-term goal of this research is to extend the capabilities of MR and apply it to in vivo imaging of gene expression. ..
  22. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  23. NOVEL MAGNETOPHARMACEUTICALS FOR MR LYMPH NODE IMAGING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..The long term goals of this research is to develop useful intravenous MR lymph node contrast agents to improve staging and treatment in patients with cancer...
  24. LCDIO FOR LYMPH NODE MR IMAGING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..abstract_text> ..
  25. LCDIO FOR LYMPH NODE MR IMAGING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..abstract_text> ..
  26. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  27. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  28. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  29. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  30. MR IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The long-term goal of this research is to extend the capabilities of MR and apply it to in vivo imaging of gene expression. ..
  31. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  32. MR IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..The long-term goal of this research is to extend the capabilities of MR and apply it to in vivo imaging of gene expression. ..
  33. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  34. HIGH EFFICIENCY LYMPHOCYTE LABELING FOR IN VIVO TRACKING
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Furthermore, the investigators believe that the proposed research is in the widest interest to the current NIAID program and other research programs in further developing robust tools to track immune cells in vivo. ..
  35. MR IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION
    Ralph Weissleder; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The long-term goal of this research is to extend the capabilities of MR and apply it to in vivo imaging of gene expression. ..