A D Wagner

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc When encoding yields remembering: insights from event-related neuroimaging
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 354:1307-24. 1999
  2. ncbi Building memories: remembering and forgetting of verbal experiences as predicted by brain activity
    A D Wagner
    Massachusetts General Hospital NMR Center, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Science 281:1188-91. 1998
  3. ncbi Prefrontal cortex and recognition memory. Functional-MRI evidence for context-dependent retrieval processes
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA
    Brain 121:1985-2002. 1998
  4. ncbi Functional specialization for semantic and phonological processing in the left inferior prefrontal cortex
    R A Poldrack
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 10:15-35. 1999
  5. ncbi Task-specific repetition priming in left inferior prefrontal cortex
    A D Wagner
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cereb Cortex 10:1176-84. 2000
  6. ncbi On the tip of the tongue: an event-related fMRI study of semantic retrieval failure and cognitive conflict
    A Maril
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 31:653-60. 2001
  7. ncbi Perceptual specificity in visual object priming: functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for a laterality difference in fusiform cortex
    W Koutstaal
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuropsychologia 39:184-99. 2001
  8. ncbi Neuropsychological dissociation between recognition familiarity and perceptual priming in visual long-term memory
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, USA
    Cortex 34:493-511. 1998
  9. ncbi On the relationship between recognition familiarity and perceptual fluency: evidence for distinct mnemonic processes
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 98:211-30. 1998
  10. ncbi Prefrontal-temporal circuitry for episodic encoding and subsequent memory
    B A Kirchhoff
    Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA
    J Neurosci 20:6173-80. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. pmc When encoding yields remembering: insights from event-related neuroimaging
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 354:1307-24. 1999
    ....
  2. ncbi Building memories: remembering and forgetting of verbal experiences as predicted by brain activity
    A D Wagner
    Massachusetts General Hospital NMR Center, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Science 281:1188-91. 1998
    ..These findings provide direct evidence that left prefrontal and temporal regions jointly promote memory formation for verbalizable events...
  3. ncbi Prefrontal cortex and recognition memory. Functional-MRI evidence for context-dependent retrieval processes
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA
    Brain 121:1985-2002. 1998
    ..These findings reconcile imaging results with the selective effects of prefrontal lesions on retrieval-intensive episodic memory tests...
  4. ncbi Functional specialization for semantic and phonological processing in the left inferior prefrontal cortex
    R A Poldrack
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 10:15-35. 1999
    ..The results suggest that a distinct region in the left inferior frontal cortex is involved in semantic processing, whereas other regions may subserve phonological processes engaged during both semantic and phonological tasks...
  5. ncbi Task-specific repetition priming in left inferior prefrontal cortex
    A D Wagner
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cereb Cortex 10:1176-84. 2000
    ....
  6. ncbi On the tip of the tongue: an event-related fMRI study of semantic retrieval failure and cognitive conflict
    A Maril
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 31:653-60. 2001
    ..During a TOT, cognitive control mechanisms may be recruited in attempts to resolve the conflict and retrieval failure that characterize this state...
  7. ncbi Perceptual specificity in visual object priming: functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for a laterality difference in fusiform cortex
    W Koutstaal
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuropsychologia 39:184-99. 2001
    ....
  8. ncbi Neuropsychological dissociation between recognition familiarity and perceptual priming in visual long-term memory
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, USA
    Cortex 34:493-511. 1998
    ..These results converge with other behavioral results to indicate that recognition familiarity does not depend on the same memory system that mediates perceptual priming...
  9. ncbi On the relationship between recognition familiarity and perceptual fluency: evidence for distinct mnemonic processes
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 98:211-30. 1998
    ..Alternative possible relationships between familiarity in explicit memory and fluency in implicit memory are discussed...
  10. ncbi Prefrontal-temporal circuitry for episodic encoding and subsequent memory
    B A Kirchhoff
    Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA
    J Neurosci 20:6173-80. 2000
    ..The similarities between prefrontal and lateral temporal encoding responses raise the possibility that prefrontal modulation of posterior cortical representations is central to encoding...
  11. ncbi Medial temporal lobe activations in fMRI and PET studies of episodic encoding and retrieval
    D L Schacter
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Hippocampus 9:7-24. 1999
    ..However, PET studies have reported anterior MTL encoding activations more frequently than have fMRI studies. We consider possible sources of these differences...
  12. ncbi Prefrontal contributions to executive control: fMRI evidence for functional distinctions within lateral Prefrontal cortex
    A D Wagner
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Neuroimage 14:1337-47. 2001
    ....
  13. ncbi When keeping in mind supports later bringing to mind: neural markers of phonological rehearsal predict subsequent remembering
    L Davachi
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, NE 20 243, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 13:1059-70. 2001
    ....
  14. ncbi Dissociations between familiarity processes in explicit recognition and implicit perceptual memory
    A D Wagner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 23:305-23. 1997
    ....
  15. ncbi Recovering meaning: left prefrontal cortex guides controlled semantic retrieval
    A D Wagner
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Neuron 31:329-38. 2001
    ..LIPC mediates a top-down bias signal that is recruited to the extent that the recovery of meaning demands controlled retrieval. Selection may reflect a specific instantiation of this mechanism...
  16. ncbi Cognitive neuroscience: forgetting of things past
    A D Wagner
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Curr Biol 11:R964-7. 2001
    ....
  17. ncbi Does recoding interfering material improve recall?
    G H Bower
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 22:240-5. 1996
    ..Again, the reorganizing clue given after learning failed to reduce RI. Clearly, if the post-information effect is genuine, then better experimental arrangements will be required to demonstrate it more reliably...