Ching Hsuan Tung

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Preparation of a cathepsin D sensitive near-infrared fluorescence probe for imaging
    C H Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 2060, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 10:892-6. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Novel factor XIII probes for blood coagulation imaging
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 4:897-9. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Fluorescent peptide probes for in vivo diagnostic imaging
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Biopolymers 76:391-403. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Arginine containing peptides as delivery vectors
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th St, Rm 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 55:281-94. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Novel branching membrane translocational peptide as gene delivery vector
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem 10:3609-14. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint A receptor-targeted near-infrared fluorescence probe for in vivo tumor imaging
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 3:784-6. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of beta-galactosidase activity using far red fluorescent switch
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 64:1579-83. 2004
  8. pmc Arthritis imaging using a near-infrared fluorescence folate-targeted probe
    Wei Tsung Chen
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 7:R310-7. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Enhanced tumor detection using a folate receptor-targeted near-infrared fluorochrome conjugate
    Woo Kyung Moon
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:539-45. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint Optical visualization of cathepsin K activity in atherosclerosis with a novel, protease-activatable fluorescence sensor
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Circulation 115:2292-8. 2007

Detail Information

Publications65

  1. ncbi request reprint Preparation of a cathepsin D sensitive near-infrared fluorescence probe for imaging
    C H Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 2060, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 10:892-6. 1999
    ..This sequence but not a scrambled control sequence showed enzyme specificity in vitro. We conclude that activatable NIRF optical probes can be synthesized to potentially probe for specific enzymes in living organisms...
  2. ncbi request reprint Novel factor XIII probes for blood coagulation imaging
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 4:897-9. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Fluorescent peptide probes for in vivo diagnostic imaging
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Biopolymers 76:391-403. 2004
    ..Several of them have been tested in various in vitro and in vivo models, and the obtained imaging information has been applied to disease detection, medical diagnosis, and drug evaluations...
  4. ncbi request reprint Arginine containing peptides as delivery vectors
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th St, Rm 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 55:281-94. 2003
    ..In this review, we specifically focus on arginine-containing MTS, and their properties, characteristics, in vitro and in vivo applications are discussed in detail...
  5. ncbi request reprint Novel branching membrane translocational peptide as gene delivery vector
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem 10:3609-14. 2002
    ..Using rhodamine labeled plasmid and eight tat-peptide complex, we were also able to demonstrate intracellular delivery of the complex by fluorescence microscopy...
  6. ncbi request reprint A receptor-targeted near-infrared fluorescence probe for in vivo tumor imaging
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 3:784-6. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of beta-galactosidase activity using far red fluorescent switch
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 64:1579-83. 2004
    ..The results indicated that in vivo real-time detection of beta-gal activity is possible by fluorescence imaging technology...
  8. pmc Arthritis imaging using a near-infrared fluorescence folate-targeted probe
    Wei Tsung Chen
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 7:R310-7. 2005
    ..This receptor-targeted imaging method may facilitate improved arthritis diagnosis and early assessment of the disease progress by providing an in vivo characterization of active macrophage status in inflammatory joint diseases...
  9. ncbi request reprint Enhanced tumor detection using a folate receptor-targeted near-infrared fluorochrome conjugate
    Woo Kyung Moon
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:539-45. 2003
    ..These results indicate that folate-modified NIR fluorochrome conjugate can be used for improved detection of FR-positive tumors...
  10. ncbi request reprint Optical visualization of cathepsin K activity in atherosclerosis with a novel, protease-activatable fluorescence sensor
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Circulation 115:2292-8. 2007
    ..To assess better the biology of CatK activity in vivo, we developed a novel near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe for imaging of CatK and evaluated it in mouse and human atherosclerosis...
  11. ncbi request reprint In-vivo imaging of tumor associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator activity
    Jong Kai Hsiao
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Charlestown, 02129, USA
    J Biomed Opt 11:34013. 2006
    ..Our results suggest a direct detection method for uPA activity in vivo and the approach can be used for monitoring tumor growth and development...
  12. ncbi request reprint Design, synthesis, and characterization of urokinase plasminogen-activator-sensitive near-infrared reporter
    Benedict Law
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Chem Biol 11:99-106. 2004
    ..No activation with negative control compounds and uPA inhibitors could be measured. These data indicate that the optimized preparation should be useful for imaging uPA in cancer...
  13. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of MMP expression and therapeutic MMP inhibition
    Christoph Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, USA
    Acad Radiol 9:S314-5. 2002
  14. ncbi request reprint Detection of dysplastic intestinal adenomas using enzyme-sensing molecular beacons in mice
    Katharina Marten
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Gastroenterology 122:406-14. 2002
    ..Proteases play key roles in the pathogenesis of tumor growth and invasion. This study assesses the expression of cathepsin B in dysplastic adenomatous polyps...
  15. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of HIV protease activity in amplicon vector-transduced gliomas
    Khalid Shah
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 64:273-8. 2004
    ..These findings may be directly applicable in using viral protease expression as a transgene marker in tumor therapy and may have implications in testing the efficacy of HIV-1PR inhibitors in vivo...
  16. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of factor XIIIa activity in thrombosis using a novel, near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent that covalently links to thrombi
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, USA
    Circulation 110:170-6. 2004
    ..In vivo imaging of FXIIIa activity could further elucidate the role of this molecule in thrombosis and other biological processes and aid in the clinical detection of acute thrombi...
  17. ncbi request reprint Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of cerebral thrombi and blood-brain barrier disruption in a mouse model of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis
    Dong Eog Kim
    Department of Radiology, Center for Molecular Imaging Research corrected Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 25:226-33. 2005
    ..This demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous in vivo monitoring of thrombus and BBB permeability in an animal model of cerebral venous thrombosis...
  18. ncbi request reprint A novel near-infrared fluorescence sensor for detection of thrombin activation in blood
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 3:207-11. 2002
    ..In addition to potentially furthering our understanding of thrombin regulation in vivo, the thrombin-activated near-infrared probe may have broad clinical application to the diagnosis of arterial and venous thrombosis...
  19. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of proteolytic activity in atherosclerosis
    Jiqiu Chen
    Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
    Circulation 105:2766-71. 2002
    ..On the basis of the hypothesis that the inflammatory response and proteolysis lead to plaque rupture, we have examined the role of cathepsin B as a model proteolytic enzyme...
  20. ncbi request reprint Developing a peptide-based near-infrared molecular probe for protease sensing
    Wellington Pham
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 15:1403-7. 2004
    ..The described synthetic strategy should have wide application for other NIR probe preparations...
  21. pmc Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of matrix metalloproteinase activity after myocardial infarction
    Jiqiu Chen
    Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Mass 02129, USA
    Circulation 111:1800-5. 2005
    ..We used a molecular probe activated by protease cleavage to image expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart after myocardial infarction...
  22. ncbi request reprint Inflammation in atherosclerosis: visualizing matrix metalloproteinase action in macrophages in vivo
    Jun o Deguchi
    Donald W Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circulation 114:55-62. 2006
    ..Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques may contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling and the onset of acute thrombotic complications...
  23. ncbi request reprint A mitochondrial targeted fusion peptide exhibits remarkable cytotoxicity
    Benedict Law
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, 02129, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 5:1944-9. 2006
    ..Our results suggested that r7-kla is an apoptosis inducer and can be potentially used as an antitumor agent, especially when combined with the appropriate systemic delivery systems...
  24. ncbi request reprint Feasibility of in vivo multichannel optical imaging of gene expression: experimental study in mice
    Umar Mahmood
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, CNY149 5403, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Bldg 149, 13th St, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Radiology 224:446-51. 2002
    ..To develop and test a multichannel reflectance imaging system for small animals on the basis of a previously developed single-channel setup...
  25. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of thrombin activity in experimental thrombi with thrombin-sensitive near-infrared molecular probe
    Farouc A Jaffer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown 02129, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 22:1929-35. 2002
    ..In this study, we investigated the ability of a novel thrombin-activatable molecular probe to provide in vivo images of thrombin activity in experimental thrombi...
  26. ncbi request reprint Fluorescence probe with a pH-sensitive trigger
    Amit K Galande
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 17:255-7. 2006
    ..This self-quenched probe is weakly fluorescent at a physiological pH of 7.4 but shows more than 3-fold fluorescence enhancement at pH 4.5...
  27. ncbi request reprint A fluorescent nanosensor for apoptotic cells
    Luisa Quinti
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, 02129, USA
    Nano Lett 6:488-90. 2006
    ..The described nanomaterials should be useful for a variety of biomedical applications including in vivo imaging of apoptosis...
  28. ncbi request reprint Protease-mediated phototoxicity of a polylysine-chlorin(E6) conjugate
    Yongdoo Choi
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    ChemMedChem 1:698-701. 2006
  29. ncbi request reprint A branched fluorescent peptide probe for imaging of activated platelets
    Ching Hsuan Tung
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Mol Pharm 2:92-5. 2005
    ..2PF fluorescence was also found 5.5-fold higher than that of the control probe, 2CF. Overall, our results suggest that 2PF binds tightly to GP-IIb/IIIa and potentially can be used for in vivo imaging of thrombosis...
  30. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of protease activity in arthritis: a novel approach for monitoring treatment response
    Andreas Wunder
    Massachusets General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown 02129, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 50:2459-65. 2004
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Imaging of differential protease expression in breast cancers for detection of aggressive tumor phenotypes
    Christoph Bremer
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
    Radiology 222:814-8. 2002
    ..To determine if different expression levels of tumor cathepsin-B activity in well differentiated and undifferentiated breast cancers could be revealed in vivo with optical imaging...
  32. ncbi request reprint Inducible release of TRAIL fusion proteins from a proapoptotic form for tumor therapy
    Khalid Shah
    Molecular Neurogenetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Cancer Res 64:3236-42. 2004
    ..This study serves as a template for design of recombinant proteins to enhance and control apoptosis of tumor cells via specific viral proteases and for use of viral proteases as in vivo reporters for cancer therapy...
  33. ncbi request reprint Detection of dysplastic intestinal adenomas using a fluorescent folate imaging probe
    Wei Tsung Chen
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 92129, USA
    Mol Imaging 4:67-74. 2005
    ..2.2%), and confirmed the source of FFP-positive cells to be primarily an F4/80-positive macrophage subpopulation. Taken together, these results indicate that probe potentially can be used to image dysplastic intestinal adenomas in vivo...
  34. ncbi request reprint Peptide-based biomaterials for protease-enhanced drug delivery
    Benedict Law
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Biomacromolecules 7:1261-5. 2006
    ..Our results suggest that this type of material may have far-reaching applications for functionally targeted drug delivery...
  35. pmc A novel method for imaging apoptosis using a caspase-1 near-infrared fluorescent probe
    Shanta M Messerli
    Departments of Neurology and Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Neuroscience Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Neoplasia 6:95-105. 2004
    ..This novel ICE-NIRF probe should prove useful in monitoring endogenous and vector-expressed caspase-1 activity, and potentially apoptosis in cell culture and in vivo...
  36. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and properties of sulfhydryl-reactive near-infrared cyanine fluorochromes for fluorescence imaging
    Yuhui Lin
    Harvard Medical School, MA, USA
    Mol Imaging 2:87-92. 2003
    ..Each fluorochrome was designed to contain an iodoacetamido group that reacts specifically with sulfhydryl-containing molecules. The synthesized fluorochromes were used to label model peptides and sulfhydryl-containing biomolecules...
  37. ncbi request reprint Development of a dual fluorogenic and chromogenic dipeptidyl peptidase IV substrate
    Nan Hui Ho
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 16:2599-602. 2006
    ..Proteolysis of GPGP-2SBPO was assayed by monitoring the absorbance and fluorescence signals from the released fluorochrome, 2SBPO, at 625 and 670nm, respectively...
  38. ncbi request reprint Selective antitumor effect of novel protease-mediated photodynamic agent
    Yongdoo Choi
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Cancer Res 66:7225-9. 2006
    ..A single low dose of PDT (0.125 mg Ce6 equivalent/kg) was sufficient to suppress tumor growth by >50%. Activatable singlet oxygen generation agents provide increased efficacy with reduced toxicity, and it could become a powerful PDT...
  39. ncbi request reprint Early diagnosis of osteoarthritis using cathepsin B sensitive near-infrared fluorescent probes
    Wen Fu T Lai
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 12:239-44. 2004
    ..However, once changes are detected, the tissue has an irreversible defect. This study investigates early diagnosis of OA on a molecular basis using a recently developed cathepsin B sensitive near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe...
  40. ncbi request reprint Enzyme-targeted fluorescent imaging probes on a multiple antigenic peptide core
    Amit K Galande
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Med Chem 49:4715-20. 2006
    ..Upon proteolytic activation with cathepsin S (EC 3.4.22.27), CyPEG-2 showed greater than 70-fold increase and more than 95% recovery in fluorescence emission...
  41. pmc Protease-sensitive fluorescent nanofibers
    Benedict Law
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:1701-4. 2007
    ..These protease-sensitive nanofibers may have considerable biomedical applications as diagnostic sensors or for protease-assisted drug deliveries...
  42. ncbi request reprint Novel near-infrared cyanine fluorochromes: synthesis, properties, and bioconjugation
    Yuhui Lin
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 13:605-10. 2002
    ..When multiple fluorochromes were attached to a single macromolecule, fluorescence quenching was observed. On the basis of this property, a novel autoquenched enzyme sensitive NIR fluorescence probe was prepared...
  43. ncbi request reprint Monofunctional near-infrared fluorochromes for imaging applications
    Scott A Hilderbrand
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Room 5406, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 16:1275-81. 2005
    ..Endothelial cell internalization of the VCAM-1 targeted phage was monitored via near-infrared fluorescence microscopy...
  44. ncbi request reprint Mechanism-based fluorescent reporter for protein kinase A detection
    Benedict Law
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 6:1361-7. 2005
    ..The remaining peptide sequence, which acts as an inhibitor, is attached covalently to the enzyme. Our results suggest that this type of sensors could have far-reaching applications in the molecular sensing of enzymes...
  45. ncbi request reprint An azulene dimer as a near-infrared quencher
    Wellington Pham
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research Massachusetts General Hospital 149 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 41:3659-62, 3519. 2002
  46. ncbi request reprint Enhancing membrane permeability by fatty acylation of oligoarginine peptides
    Wellington Pham
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 5:1148-51. 2004
  47. ncbi request reprint Conjugation of a photosensitizer to an oligoarginine-based cell-penetrating peptide increases the efficacy of photodynamic therapy
    Yongdoo Choi
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th St, Rm 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    ChemMedChem 1:458-63. 2006
    ..Tumor cells mainly underwent apoptosis at lower concentrations of the photosensitizer-polyarginine conjugate, whereas necrotic cell damage became prevalent at higher concentrations...
  48. ncbi request reprint A self-immolative reporter for beta-galactosidase sensing
    Nan Hui Ho
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Chembiochem 8:560-6. 2007
    ..The beta-galactosidase activity was assayed by monitoring the absorbance at 630 nm and fluorescence at 670 nm...
  49. ncbi request reprint Optical zymography for specific detection of urokinase plasminogen activator activity in biological samples
    Benedict Law
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Anal Biochem 338:151-8. 2005
    ..We were able to directly measure uPA activities in different cancer cell lines. This newly developed technique could be expanded to nearly all proteases, including the ones that cannot be analyzed by traditional zymography...
  50. ncbi request reprint Fluorescence molecular tomography resolves protease activity in vivo
    Vasilis Ntziachristos
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 8:757-60. 2002
    ....
  51. ncbi request reprint Imaging reactive oxygen species in arthritis
    Wei Tsung Chen
    Harvard Medical School, USA
    Mol Imaging 3:159-62. 2004
    ..In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies...
  52. ncbi request reprint Protease sensors for bioimaging
    Martin Funovics
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Harvard Medical School, Rm 5406, 149 13th St, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Anal Bioanal Chem 377:956-63. 2003
    ..These agents are designed to be biocompatible, highly activatible, and able to produce bright NIRF following protease cleavage...
  53. pmc Selective fluorescence probes for dipeptidyl peptidase activity-fibroblast activation protein and dipeptidyl peptidase IV
    Koon Siew Lai
    Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:1246-50. 2007
    ..Furthermore, the novel probes can differentiate between FAP and DPP-IV proteolytic activities in cellular assay. Potentially, this assay platform is immediately useful for novel drug discovery...
  54. ncbi request reprint High efficiency synthesis of a bioconjugatable near-infrared fluorochrome
    Wellington Pham
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 14:1048-51. 2003
    ..NIR820 is chemically stable and can be directly coupled to peptides during the solid-phase synthesis. In addition, NIR820 is also suitable for conjugation to proteins and other affinity molecules in aqueous buffer...
  55. pmc Membrane permeable esterase-activated fluorescent imaging probe
    Youngmi Kim
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 17:5054-7. 2007
    ..Permeation of probe 2 into cells and subsequent hydrolytic activation by cellular esterases result in a bright fluorescent intracellular signal...
  56. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of S-TRAIL-mediated tumor regression and apoptosis
    Khalid Shah
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mol Ther 11:926-31. 2005
    ..The use of S-TRAIL as a therapeutic protein and the ability to image noninvasively both apoptosis and any other cellular events in real time have important clinical implications...
  57. ncbi request reprint An effective method of on-resin disulfide bond formation in peptides
    Amit K Galande
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Comb Chem 7:174-7. 2005
  58. doi request reprint Transglutaminase activity in acute infarcts predicts healing outcome and left ventricular remodelling: implications for FXIII therapy and antithrombin use in myocardial infarction
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Eur Heart J 29:445-54. 2008
    ..Here we assess the impact of transglutaminase-modulating therapies on healing and evolution of heart failure using a novel, non-invasive molecular imaging technique...
  59. doi request reprint Structural modification of protease inducible preprogrammed nanofiber precursor
    Benedict Law
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Biomacromolecules 9:421-5. 2008
    ....
  60. pmc Non-invasive optical detection of cathepsin K-mediated fluorescence reveals osteoclast activity in vitro and in vivo
    Kenneth M Kozloff
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Room 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129 2060, USA
    Bone 44:190-8. 2009
    ....
  61. ncbi request reprint Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 expression from an oncolytic adenovirus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase activity in vivo without affecting antitumor efficacy in malignant glioma
    Martine L M Lamfers
    Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Gene Therapy, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Cancer Res 65:9398-405. 2005
    ..However, expression of TIMP-3 in the context of AdDelta24 did not significantly affect the antitumor efficacy of this oncolytic agent...
  62. ncbi request reprint Factor XIII deficiency causes cardiac rupture, impairs wound healing, and aggravates cardiac remodeling in mice with myocardial infarction
    Matthias Nahrendorf
    Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I, Universitat Wurzburg, Wurzburg, Germany
    Circulation 113:1196-202. 2006
    ..We hypothesized that clotting factor XIII (FXIII), a transglutaminase involved in wound healing, may play an important role in MI given prior clinical and mouse model data...
  63. pmc Survival of Tropheryma whipplei, the agent of Whipple's disease, requires phagosome acidification
    Eric Ghigo
    Unite des Rickettsies, CNRS UMR 6020, Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine, 13385 Marseille Cedex 5, France
    Infect Immun 70:1501-6. 2002
    ..Our results suggest that manipulating the intravacuolar pH may provide a new approach for the treatment of Whipple's disease...
  64. ncbi request reprint Coxiella burnetii survival in THP-1 monocytes involves the impairment of phagosome maturation: IFN-gamma mediates its restoration and bacterial killing
    Eric Ghigo
    Unite des Rickettsies, Faculte de Medecine, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche 6020, Institut Federatif de Recherche 48, Faculte de Medecine, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 5, France
    J Immunol 169:4488-95. 2002
    ..burnetii killing via two distinct mechanisms, phagosome maturation, and phagosome alkalinization. Thus, the tuning of vacuole biogenesis is likely a key part of C. burnetii survival and the pathophysiology of Q fever...
  65. ncbi request reprint Construction of a novel chimera consisting of a chelator-containing Tat peptide conjugated to a morpholino antisense oligomer for technetium-99m labeling and accelerating cellular kinetics
    Yu Min Zhang
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
    Nucl Med Biol 33:263-9. 2006
    ....