Tanya M Smith

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Dental evidence for ontogenetic differences between modern humans and Neanderthals
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:20923-8. 2010
  2. pmc First molar eruption, weaning, and life history in living wild chimpanzees
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:2787-91. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Variation in enamel thickness within the genus Homo
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 62:395-411. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Enamel thickness in Bornean and Sumatran orangutan dentitions
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 147:417-26. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Dental development of the Taï Forest chimpanzees revisited
    T M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:363-73. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Temporal nature of periradicular bands ('Striae periradicales') on mammalian tooth roots
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Front Oral Biol 13:86-92. 2009
  7. pmc Rapid dental development in a Middle Paleolithic Belgian Neanderthal
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:20220-5. 2007
  8. doi request reprint Brief communication: enamel thickness trends in the dental arcade of humans and chimpanzees
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Phys Anthropol 136:237-41. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Technical note: compatibility of microtomographic imaging systems for dental measurements
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Phys Anthropol 134:130-4. 2007
  10. doi request reprint Dental tissue proportions and enamel thickness in Neandertal and modern human molars
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 55:12-23. 2008

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. pmc Dental evidence for ontogenetic differences between modern humans and Neanderthals
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:20923-8. 2010
    ..sapiens. When compared with earlier hominin taxa, both Neanderthals and H. sapiens have extended the duration of dental development. This period of dental immaturity is particularly prolonged in modern humans...
  2. pmc First molar eruption, weaning, and life history in living wild chimpanzees
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:2787-91. 2013
    ..Estimates of M1 emergence age in australopiths are remarkably similar to the Kanyawara chimpanzees, and recent reconstructions of their life histories should be reconsidered in light of these findings...
  3. doi request reprint Variation in enamel thickness within the genus Homo
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 62:395-411. 2012
    ..Additional research is necessary to reconstruct hominin dietary ecology since thick enamel is not a prerequisite for hard-object feeding, and it is present in most later Homo species despite advances in technology and food processing...
  4. doi request reprint Enamel thickness in Bornean and Sumatran orangutan dentitions
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 147:417-26. 2012
    ..These data provide only limited support for ecological explanations of enamel thickness patterns within great ape genera. Future studies of dietary ecology and enamel thickness should consider sex differences more systematically...
  5. doi request reprint Dental development of the Taï Forest chimpanzees revisited
    T M Smith
    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 58:363-73. 2010
    ..These data do not undermine recent developmental studies of the comparative life histories of fossil hominins...
  6. doi request reprint Temporal nature of periradicular bands ('Striae periradicales') on mammalian tooth roots
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Front Oral Biol 13:86-92. 2009
    ..Despite their potential for studies of primate root growth, the etiology of these lines in mammalian roots requires further study...
  7. pmc Rapid dental development in a Middle Paleolithic Belgian Neanderthal
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:20220-5. 2007
    ..Moreover, evidence from the Scladina juvenile and other similarly aged hominins suggests that a prolonged childhood and slow life history are unique to Homo sapiens...
  8. doi request reprint Brief communication: enamel thickness trends in the dental arcade of humans and chimpanzees
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Phys Anthropol 136:237-41. 2008
    ..As nondestructive imaging techniques become commonplace (facilitating the examination of increasing numbers of fossil specimens), studies may maximize available samples by expanding beyond molars...
  9. ncbi request reprint Technical note: compatibility of microtomographic imaging systems for dental measurements
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Am J Phys Anthropol 134:130-4. 2007
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Dental tissue proportions and enamel thickness in Neandertal and modern human molars
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 55:12-23. 2008
    ..Although molar tissue proportions distinguish Neanderthals from recent Homo sapiens, additional study is necessary to assess trends in tissue proportions in the genus Homo throughout the Pleistocene...
  11. pmc Earliest evidence of modern human life history in North African early Homo sapiens
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6128-33. 2007
    ..Corresponding biological and cultural changes may have appeared relatively late in the course of human evolution...
  12. ncbi request reprint Morphology of the enamel-dentine junction in sections of anthropoid primate maxillary molars
    Anthony J Olejniczak
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 53:292-301. 2007
    ..When considered in conjunction with aspects of molar morphology, such as developmental features and enamel thickness, EDJ shape may be a useful tool for the taxonomic assessment of fossil molars...
  13. ncbi request reprint Incremental dental development: methods and applications in hominoid evolutionary studies
    Tanya M Smith
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D 04103 Leipzig, Germany
    J Hum Evol 54:205-24. 2008
    ..Areas for future research are identified, including the need for validation and standardization of certain methods, and new methods for integrating nondestructive structural and developmental studies are highlighted...