Richard Russell

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Super-recognizers: people with extraordinary face recognition ability
    Richard Russell
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:252-7. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Developmental prosopagnosia and super-recognition: no special role for surface reflectance processing
    Richard Russell
    Gettysburg College, Department of Psychology, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA 17325, USA
    Neuropsychologia 50:334-40. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint The utility of surface reflectance for the recognition of upright and inverted faces
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Vision Res 47:157-65. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Real-world face recognition: the importance of surface reflectance properties
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Perception 36:1368-74. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint A sex difference in facial contrast and its exaggeration by cosmetics
    Richard Russell
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Perception 38:1211-9. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Computational models of facial attractiveness judgments
    P Matthew Bronstad
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Perception 37:126-42. 2008
  7. pmc Crossing the 'uncanny valley': adaptation to cartoon faces can influence perception of human faces
    Haiwen Chen
    Department of Psychology, Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Perception 39:378-86. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint A perceptually based comparison of image similarity metrics
    Pawan Sinha
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 46 4077, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Perception 40:1269-81. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Is pigmentation important for face recognition? Evidence from contrast negation
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Perception 35:749-59. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Sex, beauty, and the relative luminance of facial features
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA
    Perception 32:1093-107. 2003

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Super-recognizers: people with extraordinary face recognition ability
    Richard Russell
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:252-7. 2009
    ..Our findings demonstrate the existence of people with exceptionally good face recognition ability and show that the range of face recognition and face perception ability is wider than has been previously acknowledged...
  2. doi request reprint Developmental prosopagnosia and super-recognition: no special role for surface reflectance processing
    Richard Russell
    Gettysburg College, Department of Psychology, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA 17325, USA
    Neuropsychologia 50:334-40. 2012
    ..Instead, these findings support the idea that face recognition ability is related to neural circuits using representations that integrate shape and pigmentation information...
  3. ncbi request reprint The utility of surface reflectance for the recognition of upright and inverted faces
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Vision Res 47:157-65. 2007
    ..These results provide evidence that facial identity is a function of reflectance as well as shape, and place important constraints on explanations of why inversion impairs face recognition...
  4. ncbi request reprint Real-world face recognition: the importance of surface reflectance properties
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Perception 36:1368-74. 2007
    ..This provides evidence that reflectance information is important for face recognition in ecologically relevant contexts...
  5. ncbi request reprint A sex difference in facial contrast and its exaggeration by cosmetics
    Richard Russell
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Perception 38:1211-9. 2009
    ..These results suggest that cosmetics may function in part by exaggerating a sexually dimorphic attribute-facial contrast-to make the face appear more feminine and hence attractive...
  6. ncbi request reprint Computational models of facial attractiveness judgments
    P Matthew Bronstad
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Perception 37:126-42. 2008
    ..This provides novel evidence for the importance of averageness and sexual dimorphism, but not symmetry, in human judgments of facial attractiveness...
  7. pmc Crossing the 'uncanny valley': adaptation to cartoon faces can influence perception of human faces
    Haiwen Chen
    Department of Psychology, Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Perception 39:378-86. 2010
    ..This supports the possibility that there are representations that are specific to faces yet common to all kinds of faces...
  8. ncbi request reprint A perceptually based comparison of image similarity metrics
    Pawan Sinha
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 46 4077, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Perception 40:1269-81. 2011
    ..These results suggest that, in the domain of natural images of the kind we have used, the L1 metric may better capture human notions of image similarity...
  9. ncbi request reprint Is pigmentation important for face recognition? Evidence from contrast negation
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Perception 35:749-59. 2006
    ..This provides evidence that the perception of pigmentation, not shape, is selectively disrupted by negation and, by extension, that pigmentation contributes to the neural representation of face identity...
  10. ncbi request reprint Sex, beauty, and the relative luminance of facial features
    Richard Russell
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA
    Perception 32:1093-107. 2003
    ..Implications for the causes of cosmetics usage are discussed...