J Michaelson

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Breast cancer: computer simulation method for estimating optimal intervals for screening
    J S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA
    Radiology 212:551-60. 1999
  2. doi How cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Cancer 115:5095-107. 2009
  3. doi Why cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusett, USA
    Cancer 115:5084-94. 2009
  4. pmc Spread of human cancer cells occurs with probabilities indicative of a nongenetic mechanism
    J S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Br J Cancer 93:1244-9. 2005
  5. ncbi The effect of tumor size and lymph node status on breast carcinoma lethality
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 98:2133-43. 2003
  6. doi Improved web-based calculators for predicting breast carcinoma outcomes
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Breast Cancer Res Treat 128:827-35. 2011
  7. ncbi The role of molecular discreteness in normal and cancerous growth
    J Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, Boston 02129, USA
    Anticancer Res 19:4853-67. 1999
  8. ncbi The pattern of breast cancer screening utilization and its consequences
    James Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 94:37-43. 2002
  9. ncbi Predicting the survival of patients with breast carcinoma using tumor size
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 95:713-23. 2002
  10. doi Matched pair analyses of stage IV breast cancer with or without resection of primary breast site
    B Cady
    Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Gillette Center for Breast Cancer, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Ann Surg Oncol 15:3384-95. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi Breast cancer: computer simulation method for estimating optimal intervals for screening
    J S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA
    Radiology 212:551-60. 1999
    ..To develop and evaluate a mathematic method that can be used to determine the optimal screening interval for detection of breast cancer prior to distant metastatic spread...
  2. doi How cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Cancer 115:5095-107. 2009
    ....
  3. doi Why cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusett, USA
    Cancer 115:5084-94. 2009
    ....
  4. pmc Spread of human cancer cells occurs with probabilities indicative of a nongenetic mechanism
    J S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Br J Cancer 93:1244-9. 2005
    ..These values indicate that the spread of human breast cancer and melanoma cells is unlikely to occur by a mechanism requiring mutation at the time of spread...
  5. ncbi The effect of tumor size and lymph node status on breast carcinoma lethality
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 98:2133-43. 2003
    ....
  6. doi Improved web-based calculators for predicting breast carcinoma outcomes
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Breast Cancer Res Treat 128:827-35. 2011
    ..Our breast carcinoma calculators provide accurate and useful estimates of the risk of death, which can aid in analysis of the various adjuvant therapy options available to each patient...
  7. ncbi The role of molecular discreteness in normal and cancerous growth
    J Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, Boston 02129, USA
    Anticancer Res 19:4853-67. 1999
    ..Indeed, such an approach allows us do a sufficiently good job of imitating the growth and spread of tumors as to be able to make estimates the most effective ways to both detect and treat cancer...
  8. ncbi The pattern of breast cancer screening utilization and its consequences
    James Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 94:37-43. 2002
    ....
  9. ncbi Predicting the survival of patients with breast carcinoma using tumor size
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 95:713-23. 2002
    ..In this report, the authors provide such a method...
  10. doi Matched pair analyses of stage IV breast cancer with or without resection of primary breast site
    B Cady
    Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Gillette Center for Breast Cancer, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Ann Surg Oncol 15:3384-95. 2008
    ..Reports demonstrate improved survival of stage IV breast cancer patients with primary cancer resection. This may result from selection for surgery, rather than biological processes...
  11. doi Development and validation of a model predictive of occult nipple involvement in women undergoing mastectomy
    J E Rusby
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Br J Surg 95:1356-61. 2008
    ..This prospective study aimed to build a predictive model using preoperative information to aid selection for nipple-sparing mastectomy...
  12. doi Do sentinel node micrometastases predict recurrence risk in ductal carcinoma in situ and ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion?
    Colleen D Murphy
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Am J Surg 196:566-8. 2008
    ....
  13. ncbi Melanoma in the young: differences and similarities with adult melanoma: a case-matched controlled analysis
    Daan P Livestro
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Cancer 110:614-24. 2007
    ..In this study, the use of an adult control group that was matched for tumor thickness adjusted for this bias and allowed for a comparison of the biology of pediatric melanoma and adult melanoma...
  14. ncbi Gauging the impact of breast carcinoma screening in terms of tumor size and death rate
    James S Michaelson
    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 98:2114-24. 2003
    ....
  15. ncbi Breast cancer diagnosis in women < or = 40 versus 50 to 60 years: increasing size and stage disparity compared with older women over time
    Katherina Zabicki
    Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Yawkey 9, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Ann Surg Oncol 13:1072-7. 2006
    ..Women < or = 40 years account for 5% of new breast cancer diagnoses. Although there is increased awareness of genetic and other breast cancer risk factors, it is not clear whether this has resulted in earlier diagnosis in young women...
  16. ncbi Long-term risk of false-positive screening results and subsequent biopsy as a function of mammography use
    Karen Blanchard
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Yawkey 7939, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Radiology 240:335-42. 2006
    ..To retrospectively determine the long-term risk of false-positive mammographic assessments and to evaluate the effect of screening regularity on the risk of false-positive events...
  17. ncbi Biology of desmoplastic melanoma: a case-control comparison with other melanomas
    Daan P Livestro
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    J Clin Oncol 23:6739-46. 2005
    ..Consequently, comparisons with other forms of melanoma have been strongly biased by differences in Breslow stage. This is the first case-matched control study comparing DM with other forms of melanoma...
  18. ncbi Prevalence of hereditary breast/ovarian carcinoma risk in patients with a personal history of breast or ovarian carcinoma in a mammography population
    Francisco J Dominguez
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 104:1849-53. 2005
    ..The authors sought to determine the prevalence of family histories suggestive of a hereditary breast carcinoma syndrome in a cohort of patients with a personal history of breast and/or ovarian carcinoma presenting for mammography...
  19. ncbi Evaluation of hereditary risk in a mammography population
    Julie L Jones
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Clin Breast Cancer 6:38-44. 2005
    ..We then applied current risk-assessment models to determine the prevalence of women at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...
  20. ncbi The age at which women begin mammographic screening
    James A Colbert
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 101:1850-9. 2004
    ..The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammographic screening for women starting at the age of 40 years. The authors examined the age at which women began screening at a large tertiary care center...
  21. ncbi Mammographic screening: patterns of use and estimated impact on breast carcinoma survival
    Karen Blanchard
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Cancer 101:495-507. 2004
    ..In the current report, the authors describe patterns of screening use among women who were examined at a large screening and diagnostic service and estimate the added mortality associated with missed screening mammograms...
  22. ncbi A decline in breast-cancer incidence
    Blake Cady
    N Engl J Med 357:511; author reply 513. 2007
  23. ncbi Breast duct anatomy in the human nipple: three-dimensional patterns and clinical implications
    Jennifer E Rusby
    Gillette Center for Breast Cancer, Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Breast Cancer Res Treat 106:171-9. 2007
    ..There is variation in the number of ducts reported and little is known about the spatial location of ducts, their size, and their relationship to orifices on the surface...