PETER W LIBBY

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Association of thrombospondin-1 and cardiac allograft vasculopathy in human cardiac allografts
    X M Zhao
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Circulation 103:525-31. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint The forgotten majority: unfinished business in cardiovascular risk reduction
    Peter Libby
    Donald W Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Am Coll Cardiol 46:1225-8. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Inflammatory mechanisms: the molecular basis of inflammation and disease
    Peter Libby
    Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Nutr Rev 65:S140-6. 2007
  4. pmc Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis for improving diagnostic and therapeutic development
    Thibaut Quillard
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circ Res 111:231-44. 2012
  5. pmc Monocyte heterogeneity in cardiovascular disease
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115, USA
    Semin Immunopathol 35:553-62. 2013
  6. pmc Immune effector mechanisms implicated in atherosclerosis: from mice to humans
    Peter Libby
    Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, NRB7, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Immunity 38:1092-104. 2013
  7. pmc Inflammation in atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 32:2045-51. 2012
  8. pmc The serpin proteinase inhibitor 9 is an endogenous inhibitor of interleukin 1beta-converting enzyme (caspase-1) activity in human vascular smooth muscle cells
    J L Young
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Exp Med 191:1535-44. 2000
  9. ncbi request reprint Changing concepts of atherogenesis
    P Libby
    Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Intern Med 247:349-58. 2000
  10. ncbi request reprint Inflammation and cardiovascular disease mechanisms
    Peter Libby
    Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 83:456S-460S. 2006

Research Grants

  1. Atherothrombosis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2005
  2. Training Grant in Cardiovascular Research
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. PATHOGENESIS OF TRANSPLANT-ASSOCIATED ARTERIOSCLEROSIS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 1993
  4. CONTROL OF GROWTH OF VASCULAR WALL CELLS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 1992
  5. PATHOGENESIS OF TRANSPLANT ASSOCIATED ARTERIOSCLEROSIS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2002
  6. Determinants of Arterial Remodeling in Atherogenesis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2007
  7. Inflammatory Mechanisms of Atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2006
  8. Molecular Determinants of Arterial Remodeling in Atherogenesis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2010
  9. CONTROL OF GROWTH OF VASCULAR WALL CELLS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 1993

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications72

  1. ncbi request reprint Association of thrombospondin-1 and cardiac allograft vasculopathy in human cardiac allografts
    X M Zhao
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Circulation 103:525-31. 2001
    ..In particular, we tested the involvement in cardiac allografts of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a matrix glycoprotein that inhibits angiogenesis and facilitates smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation...
  2. ncbi request reprint The forgotten majority: unfinished business in cardiovascular risk reduction
    Peter Libby
    Donald W Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Am Coll Cardiol 46:1225-8. 2005
    ..Thus, physicians must continue to educate their patients regarding an optimal balance of drug therapy and personal behavior...
  3. ncbi request reprint Inflammatory mechanisms: the molecular basis of inflammation and disease
    Peter Libby
    Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Nutr Rev 65:S140-6. 2007
    ....
  4. pmc Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis for improving diagnostic and therapeutic development
    Thibaut Quillard
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circ Res 111:231-44. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Monocyte heterogeneity in cardiovascular disease
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115, USA
    Semin Immunopathol 35:553-62. 2013
    ....
  6. pmc Immune effector mechanisms implicated in atherosclerosis: from mice to humans
    Peter Libby
    Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, NRB7, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Immunity 38:1092-104. 2013
    ....
  7. pmc Inflammation in atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 32:2045-51. 2012
    ..Inflammation regulates aspects of plaque biology that trigger the thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. Translation of these discoveries to humans has enabled both novel mechanistic insights and practical clinical advances...
  8. pmc The serpin proteinase inhibitor 9 is an endogenous inhibitor of interleukin 1beta-converting enzyme (caspase-1) activity in human vascular smooth muscle cells
    J L Young
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Exp Med 191:1535-44. 2000
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Changing concepts of atherogenesis
    P Libby
    Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Intern Med 247:349-58. 2000
    ..Such new treatments could further reduce the considerable burden of morbidity and mortality due to this modern scourge, and reduce reliance on costly technologies that address the symptoms rather than the cause of atherosclerosis...
  10. ncbi request reprint Inflammation and cardiovascular disease mechanisms
    Peter Libby
    Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 83:456S-460S. 2006
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Pathophysiology of coronary artery disease
    Peter Libby
    Donald W Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass 02115, USA
    Circulation 111:3481-8. 2005
    ..The concept of "interventional cardiology" must expand beyond mechanical revascularization to embrace preventive interventions that forestall future events...
  12. ncbi request reprint Metformin and vascular protection: a cardiologist's view
    P Libby
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Diabetes Metab 29:6S117-20. 2003
    ..The potential vascular protective effects of metformin, demonstrated by the UK Prospective Diabetes Study, may complement other strategies within such a framework...
  13. ncbi request reprint Vascular biology of atherosclerosis: overview and state of the art
    Peter Libby
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Am J Cardiol 91:3A-6A. 2003
    ..Thus, the time has come to embrace inflammation as a common pathway for atherogenic risk factors and for providing new opportunities for therapeutic intervention...
  14. ncbi request reprint Inflammation in atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nature 420:868-74. 2002
    ..Identifying the triggers for inflammation and unravelling the details of inflammatory pathways may eventually furnish new therapeutic targets...
  15. ncbi request reprint Inflammation and atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circulation 105:1135-43. 2002
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques: new mechanisms and clinical targets
    Peter Libby
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 8:1257-62. 2002
  17. ncbi request reprint Managing the risk of atherosclerosis: the role of high-density lipoprotein
    P Libby
    Cardiovascular Division of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Am J Cardiol 88:3N-8N. 2001
    ..This article examines recent experimental approaches aimed at elucidating these antiatherogenic, HDL-mediated mechanisms...
  18. ncbi request reprint Atherosclerosis: disease biology affecting the coronary vasculature
    Peter Libby
    Harvard Medical School and Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Am J Cardiol 98:3Q-9Q. 2006
    ..Treatment of vulnerable patients should include measures to stabilize plaques and to lessen the thrombotic consequences of plaque disruptions...
  19. ncbi request reprint Inflammation in diabetes mellitus: role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Am J Cardiol 99:27B-40B. 2007
    ....
  20. doi request reprint Progress and challenges in translating the biology of atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nature 473:317-25. 2011
    ..Understanding how to combine experimental and clinical science will provide further insight into atherosclerosis and could lead to new clinical applications...
  21. doi request reprint Clinical implications of inflammation for cardiovascular primary prevention
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Eur Heart J 31:777-83. 2010
    ..The clinical use of biomarkers of inflammation may provide the practitioner with a tool to help gauge residual risk, and chart a course for its optimal management...
  22. pmc Inflammation in atherosclerosis: from pathophysiology to practice
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Am Coll Cardiol 54:2129-38. 2009
    ..This review provides an update of the role of inflammation in atherogenesis and highlights how translation of these advances in basic science promises to change clinical practice...
  23. ncbi request reprint Inflammation in atherosclerosis: transition from theory to practice
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circ J 74:213-20. 2010
    ..Inflammation is thus moving from a theoretical concept to a tool that provides practical clinical utility in risk assessment and targeting of therapy...
  24. ncbi request reprint Plaque stabilization: Can we turn theory into evidence?
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02135, USA
    Am J Cardiol 98:26P-33P. 2006
    ..This article reviews the evolution of the concept of plaque stabilization and reexamines the evidence for the role of statins in that process...
  25. pmc Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    J Lipid Res 50:S352-7. 2009
    ..This convergence of clinical and pathological observations highlighted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of disruption of plaques that can precipitate thromboses...
  26. doi request reprint Role of inflammation in atherosclerosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis
    Peter Libby
    Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Am J Med 121:S21-31. 2008
    ....
  27. pmc The molecular mechanisms of the thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis
    P Libby
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    J Intern Med 263:517-27. 2008
    ..Novel molecular imaging strategies may permit visualization of proteinase activity in vivo, providing a new functional window on pathophysiology...
  28. doi request reprint The vascular biology of atherosclerosis and imaging targets
    Peter Libby
    Donald W Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Nucl Med 51:33S-37S. 2010
    ..The goals for the years to come must include translation of the experimental work to visualization of these appealing biologic targets in humans...
  29. ncbi request reprint Host CD40 ligand deficiency induces long-term allograft survival and donor-specific tolerance in mouse cardiac transplantation but does not prevent graft arteriosclerosis
    K Shimizu
    Departments ofMedicine and Pathology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Immunol 165:3506-18. 2000
    ..Therefore, we propose that early alloresponses, without CD40-CD40L costimulation, induce allospecific tolerance but may trigger allo-independent mechanisms that ultimately result in graft vasculopathy...
  30. ncbi request reprint Statins alter smooth muscle cell accumulation and collagen content in established atheroma of watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits
    Y Fukumoto
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circulation 103:993-9. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that statins can reduce MMP expression in atheroma and that cell-permeant statins can decrease SMC number and collagen gene expression in vivo...
  31. ncbi request reprint Absence of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 reduces atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice
    L Gu
    Department of Adult Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Mol Cell 2:275-81. 1998
    ..Thus, MCP-1 plays a unique and crucial role in the initiation of atherosclerosis and may provide a new therapeutic target in this disorder...
  32. ncbi request reprint CD40 signaling and plaque instability
    U Schonbeck
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circ Res 89:1092-103. 2001
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Expression of neutrophil collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-8) in human atheroma: a novel collagenolytic pathway suggested by transcriptional profiling
    M P Herman
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circulation 104:1899-904. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: These data point to MMP-8 as a previously unsuspected participant in collagen breakdown, an important determinant of the vulnerability of human atheroma...
  34. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical strain induces class a scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte/macrophages and THP-1 cells: a potential mechanism of increased atherosclerosis in hypertension
    H Sakamoto
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circulation 104:109-14. 2001
    ..7+/-4.7% for animals on standard chow; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Biomechanical strain induces SRA expression by monocyte/macrophages, suggesting a novel mechanism for promotion of atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients...
  35. pmc Functional CD40 ligand is expressed on human vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages: implications for CD40-CD40 ligand signaling in atherosclerosis
    F Mach
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94:1931-6. 1997
    ....
  36. ncbi request reprint PPARalpha activators inhibit cytokine-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human endothelial cells
    N Marx
    Vascular Medicine and Atherosclerosis Unit, Cardiovascular Division and the Vascular Research Division, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Circulation 99:3125-31. 1999
    ..The present study investigated PPARalpha expression in human ECs and their regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)...
  37. ncbi request reprint Reduction of atherosclerosis in mice by inhibition of CD40 signalling
    F Mach
    Vascular Medicine and Atherosclerosis Unit, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nature 394:200-3. 1998
    ..These data support the involvement of inflammatory pathways in atherosclerosis and indicate a role for CD40 signalling during atherogenesis in hyperlipidaemic mice...
  38. ncbi request reprint Hyperlipidemia and atherosclerotic lesion development in LDL receptor-deficient mice fed defined semipurified diets with and without cholate
    A H Lichtman
    Vascular Research Division, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 19:1938-44. 1999
    ..This study shows that sodium cholate is not necessary for the formation of atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice and that precisely defined semipurified diets are a valuable tool for the examination of diet-gene interactions...
  39. ncbi request reprint Dietary lipid lowering reduces tissue factor expression in rabbit atheroma
    M Aikawa
    Vascular Medicine and Atherosclerosis Unit, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass 02115, USA
    Circulation 100:1215-22. 1999
    ..Tissue factor (TF) overexpressed in atheroma may accelerate thrombus formation at the sites of plaque disruption. A cell surface cytokine CD40 ligand (CD40L) enhances TF expression in vitro...
  40. ncbi request reprint Expression of B7 molecules in recipient, not donor, mice determines the survival of cardiac allografts
    D A Mandelbrot
    Immunology Research Division, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Immunol 163:3753-7. 1999
    ..The indefinite survival of allografts into B7-1/B7-2-/- recipients further shows that the absence of B7 costimulation alone is sufficient to prevent rejection...
  41. pmc Cystatin C deficiency in human atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms
    G P Shi
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Clin Invest 104:1191-7. 1999
    ..The findings highlight a potentially important role for imbalance between cysteine proteases and cystatin C in arterial wall remodeling and establish that cystatin C deficiency occurs in vascular disease...
  42. ncbi request reprint Molecular biology of atherosclerosis
    P Libby
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Int J Cardiol 62:S23-9. 1997
    ..Rather than attempting a comprehensive overview, we will focus primarily on selected examples where new information sheds light on potential molecular mechanisms underlying these pathologic processes...
  43. ncbi request reprint CD154 (CD40 ligand)
    U Schonbeck
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Int J Biochem Cell Biol 32:687-93. 2000
    ..Accordingly, CD40/CD154 interactions have advanced as a potential therapeutic target for these diseases, whereby two opposing strategies, interruption as well as enhancement of CD40 signaling, are explored for beneficial outcomes...
  44. ncbi request reprint Lipid lowering improves endothelial functions
    P Libby
    Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, LMRC 307, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Int J Cardiol 74:S3-S10. 2000
    ..Continued probing of the basic mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction and its treatment may lead to new therapies that offer clinical benefits in patients with atherosclerosis, including reductions in coronary events...
  45. ncbi request reprint Lipid lowering reduces proteolytic and prothrombotic potential in rabbit atheroma
    M Aikawa
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 902:140-52. 2000
    ..These results suggest potential mechanisms by which lipid lowering reduces acute coronary events in patients by decreasing proteolytic and prothrombotic activity within the atheroma...
  46. ncbi request reprint Mechanical deformation promotes secretion of IL-1 alpha and IL-1 receptor antagonist
    R T Lee
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Immunol 159:5084-8. 1997
    ..This pathophysiologic mechanism may play a role in the anatomic localization of some inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis, which occurs more commonly in locations where the dermis is subjected to repetitive stretch or trauma...
  47. ncbi request reprint Circumferential stress and matrix metalloproteinase 1 in human coronary atherosclerosis. Implications for plaque rupture
    R T Lee
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 16:1070-3. 1996
    ..Degradation and weakening of the collagenous extracellular matrix at these critical high-stress regions may play a role in the pathogenesis of plaque rupture and acute ischemic syndromes...
  48. pmc Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 is a novel inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases with implications for atherosclerosis
    M P Herman
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Clin Invest 107:1117-26. 2001
    ..These findings establish a new, anti-inflammatory function of TFPI-2 of potential pathophysiological significance for human diseases, including atherosclerosis...
  49. ncbi request reprint Mechanical strain induces specific changes in the synthesis and organization of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells
    R T Lee
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115, USA
    J Biol Chem 276:13847-51. 2001
    ..These data demonstrate that mechanical deformation increases specific vascular smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis and aggregation, indicating a highly coordinated extracellular matrix response to biomechanical stimulation...
  50. ncbi request reprint Macrophages and atherosclerotic plaque stability
    P Libby
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Curr Opin Lipidol 7:330-5. 1996
    ..We hypothesize that lipid-lowering reduces clinical events, as shown in recent trials, by stabilizing lesions in part by reversing some of the maladaptive functions of macrophages described above...
  51. ncbi request reprint Soluble CD40L and cardiovascular risk in women
    U Schonbeck
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Circulation 104:2266-8. 2001
    ..It is unknown, however, whether elevations of circulating sCD40L precede the onset of acute cardiovascular symptoms...
  52. ncbi request reprint An HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, cerivastatin, suppresses growth of macrophages expressing matrix metalloproteinases and tissue factor in vivo and in vitro
    M Aikawa
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circulation 103:276-83. 2001
    ..Lipid lowering with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors reduces acute coronary events...
  53. pmc Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in atherosclerosis: studies of osteopetrotic mice
    J H Qiao
    Department of Medicine, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
    Am J Pathol 150:1687-99. 1997
    ..The effects of the op mutation on atherogenesis may have resulted from decreased circulating monocytes, reduced tissue macrophages, or diminished arterial M-CSF...
  54. ncbi request reprint Induction of endothelial-leukocyte interaction by interferon-gamma requires coactivation of nuclear factor-kappaB
    R De Caterina
    Vascular Medicine Unit, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 21:227-32. 2001
    ..These findings suggest that factors that activate NF-kappaB can synergize with IFN-gamma in promoting endothelial-leukocyte interaction...
  55. ncbi request reprint Endothelial function and coronary artery disease
    S Kinlay
    Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Curr Opin Lipidol 12:383-9. 2001
    ..Such genetic heterogeneity may nonetheless offer new insights into the variability of endothelial function...
  56. pmc Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene expression in vascular cells and in experimental and human atherosclerosis
    S K Clinton
    Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115
    Am J Pathol 140:301-16. 1992
    ..The local production of MCSF during atherogenesis may contribute to macrophage survival and proliferation or activate specific macrophage functions such as expression of the scavenger receptor and secretion of apo E...
  57. ncbi request reprint Ligation of CD40 onvascular smooth muscle cells mediates loss of interstitial collagen via matrix metalloproteinase activity
    D B Horton
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 947:329-36. 2001
    ..Thus, CD40/CD40L interactions might play a key role in rendering atheromatous lesions prone to rupture...
  58. pmc Macrophage myeloperoxidase regulation by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human atherosclerosis and implications in acute coronary syndromes
    S Sugiyama
    Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Pathol 158:879-91. 2001
    ....
  59. pmc Inhibition of CD40 signaling limits evolution of established atherosclerosis in mice
    U Schonbeck
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, LMRC 309, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:7458-63. 2000
    ..This study lends further support to the importance of this specific inflammatory signaling pathway in atherosclerosis and its complications...
  60. pmc Interferon-gamma deficiency prevents coronary arteriosclerosis but not myocardial rejection in transplanted mouse hearts
    H Nagano
    Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Clin Invest 100:550-7. 1997
    ..Thus, development of GAD, but not parenchymal rejection, requires IFN-gamma. Reduced expression of MHC antigens and leukocyte adhesion molecules may contribute to the lack of coronary arteriopathy in hearts allografted into GKO mice...
  61. pmc Heterozygous osteopetrotic (op) mutation reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor- deficient mice
    T Rajavashisth
    Atherosclerosis Research Center, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048, USA
    J Clin Invest 101:2702-10. 1998
    ..These studies support the conclusion that M-CSF participates critically in fatty streak formation and progression to a complex fibrous lesion...
  62. ncbi request reprint MRI of rabbit atherosclerosis in response to dietary cholesterol lowering
    M V McConnell
    Noninvasive Laboratory, Vascular Medicine, Atherosclerosis Unit, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 19:1956-9. 1999
    ..Plaque progression was seen with maintenance of high-cholesterol diet. MRI is a promising noninvasive technology for directly imaging atherosclerosis and its response to therapeutic interventions...
  63. ncbi request reprint Host bone-marrow cells are a source of donor intimal smooth- muscle-like cells in murine aortic transplant arteriopathy
    K Shimizu
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Med 7:738-41. 2001
    ..Thus, smooth-muscle--like cells in GAD lesions can originate from circulating bone--marrow-derived precursors...
  64. ncbi request reprint Deficiency of the cysteine protease cathepsin S impairs microvessel growth
    G P Shi
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    Circ Res 92:493-500. 2003
    ..These results demonstrate a novel function of endothelium-derived Cat S in angiogenesis...
  65. ncbi request reprint What have we learned about the biology of atherosclerosis? The role of inflammation
    P Libby
    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Am J Cardiol 88:3J-6J. 2001
    ..Studies in rabbits with diet-induced atherosclerosis have shown that reducing cholesterol consumption indeed decreases inflammation in atheroma and improves those features of plaques associated with stability...
  66. ncbi request reprint The CD40/CD154 receptor/ligand dyad
    U Schonbeck
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Cell Mol Life Sci 58:4-43. 2001
    ....
  67. doi request reprint Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein
    Paul M Ridker
    Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    N Engl J Med 359:2195-207. 2008
    ....
  68. pmc Targeted deletion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 attenuates left ventricular enlargement and collagen accumulation after experimental myocardial infarction
    A Ducharme
    Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, and Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Clin Invest 106:55-62. 2000
    ..The decrease in collagen accumulation and the enhanced expression of other MMPs suggest that MMP-9 plays a prominent role in extracellular matrix remodeling after MI...
  69. ncbi request reprint Inflammation and atherothrombosis
    L Robbie
    Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 947:167-79; discussion 179-80. 2001
    ..Enhanced understanding of the processes involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and its complications will surely provide areas that can be targeted in the treatment of the disease...
  70. pmc Deletion of EP4 on bone marrow-derived cells enhances inflammation and angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation
    Eva H C Tang
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Ave Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 31:261-9. 2011
    ..To examine whether a lack of prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) on bone marrow-derived cells would increase local inflammation and enhance the formation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in vivo...
  71. pmc Molecular imaging of macrophage protease activity in cardiovascular inflammation in vivo
    T Quillard
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Thromb Haemost 105:828-36. 2011
    ..Imaging of macrophages and protease activity should provide an important adjunct to understanding pathophysiology in vivo, evaluating the effects of interventions, and ultimately aiding clinical care...
  72. ncbi request reprint Stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) expression driven by a macrophage-specific promoter results in reduced viability in transgenic mice
    R P Fabunmi
    Lipid Metabolism Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, GRJ 1328, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Atherosclerosis 148:375-86. 2000
    ....

Research Grants30

  1. Atherothrombosis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..This effort will hasten the translation of research discoveries to promote health of the heart and blood vessels at home and abroad. ..
  2. Training Grant in Cardiovascular Research
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In this application we propose to continue our longstanding record (documented within) or preparing a talented pool of fellows for successful academic careers. ..
  3. PATHOGENESIS OF TRANSPLANT-ASSOCIATED ARTERIOSCLEROSIS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Finally, we will correlate results of these immunologic studies with angiographic evidence of vascular dysfunction or injury determined at the time of flood drawing in the same patients...
  4. CONTROL OF GROWTH OF VASCULAR WALL CELLS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ..Delineation of such pathways will help to understand the mechanisms that modulate undesirable amplification of local inflammatory related to SMC growth...
  5. PATHOGENESIS OF TRANSPLANT ASSOCIATED ARTERIOSCLEROSIS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The observations point to distinct mechanisms mediating acute vs. chronic allograft pathologies, and suggest that different therapeutic interventions will be uniquely applicable to each. ..
  6. Determinants of Arterial Remodeling in Atherogenesis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Together, this project should help in understanding the mechanisms of extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis, a key determinant of the clinical expression of this disease. ..
  7. Inflammatory Mechanisms of Atherosclerosis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..5. We will explore a putative functional role of a novel prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 interacting protein (EPRAP) in endogenous anti-inflammatory pathways. ..
  8. Molecular Determinants of Arterial Remodeling in Atherogenesis
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This project should help in understanding the mechanisms of arterial remodeling during atherogenesis. These complementary studies will translate further preclinical findings into clinical preventive cardiovascular medicine. ..
  9. CONTROL OF GROWTH OF VASCULAR WALL CELLS
    Peter Libby; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..The results of this study should help unravel mechanisms of arterial pathology, to understand normal vascular homeostasis, and to aid the rational design of therapies for prevalent vascular diseases...