Michael T Laub

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis
    Jeffrey M Skerker
    Bauer Center for Genomics Research, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Biol 3:e334. 2005
  2. pmc Helix bundle loops determine whether histidine kinases autophosphorylate in cis or in trans
    Orr Ashenberg
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Mol Biol 425:1198-209. 2013
  3. ncbi Regulation of the bacterial cell cycle by an integrated genetic circuit
    Emanuele G Biondi
    FAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nature 444:899-904. 2006
  4. pmc Dynamics of two Phosphorelays controlling cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus
    Y Erin Chen
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Bacteriol 191:7417-29. 2009
  5. pmc Systematic dissection and trajectory-scanning mutagenesis of the molecular interface that ensures specificity of two-component signaling pathways
    Emily J Capra
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    PLoS Genet 6:e1001220. 2010
  6. pmc A dynamic complex of signaling proteins uses polar localization to regulate cell-fate asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus
    Christos G Tsokos
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Dev Cell 20:329-41. 2011
  7. ncbi A phosphorelay system controls stalk biogenesis during cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus
    Emanuele G Biondi
    Bauer Center for Genomics Research, Harvard University, 7 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Mol Microbiol 59:386-401. 2006
  8. pmc Rewiring the specificity of two-component signal transduction systems
    Jeffrey M Skerker
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cell 133:1043-54. 2008
  9. doi Spatial tethering of kinases to their substrates relaxes evolutionary constraints on specificity
    Emily J Capra
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Mol Microbiol 86:1393-403. 2012
  10. pmc Modularity of the bacterial cell cycle enables independent spatial and temporal control of DNA replication
    Kristina Jonas
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Curr Biol 21:1092-101. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. pmc Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis
    Jeffrey M Skerker
    Bauer Center for Genomics Research, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Biol 3:e334. 2005
    ..We propose that this system-wide selectivity insulates two-component pathways from one another, preventing unwanted cross-talk...
  2. pmc Helix bundle loops determine whether histidine kinases autophosphorylate in cis or in trans
    Orr Ashenberg
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Mol Biol 425:1198-209. 2013
    ..These findings suggest that histidine kinases are under selective pressure to maintain their mode of autophosphorylation, but they can do so with a wide range of sequences...
  3. ncbi Regulation of the bacterial cell cycle by an integrated genetic circuit
    Emanuele G Biondi
    FAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nature 444:899-904. 2006
    ..Our results define a single integrated circuit whose components and connectivity can account for the cell cycle oscillations of CtrA in Caulobacter...
  4. pmc Dynamics of two Phosphorelays controlling cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus
    Y Erin Chen
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Bacteriol 191:7417-29. 2009
    ..More generally, our results emphasize how the bifunctional nature of histidine kinases can help switch cells between mutually exclusive states...
  5. pmc Systematic dissection and trajectory-scanning mutagenesis of the molecular interface that ensures specificity of two-component signaling pathways
    Emily J Capra
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    PLoS Genet 6:e1001220. 2010
    ..Only some trajectories allow both the maintenance of phosphotransfer and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk...
  6. pmc A dynamic complex of signaling proteins uses polar localization to regulate cell-fate asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus
    Christos G Tsokos
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Dev Cell 20:329-41. 2011
    ..Our results reveal the mechanisms by which CckA is regulated in a cell-type-dependent manner. More generally, our findings reveal how cells exploit subcellular localization to orchestrate sophisticated regulatory processes...
  7. ncbi A phosphorelay system controls stalk biogenesis during cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus
    Emanuele G Biondi
    Bauer Center for Genomics Research, Harvard University, 7 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Mol Microbiol 59:386-401. 2006
    ..This is the first example of a general method for identifying the connectivity of a phosphorelay and can be applied to any organism with two-component signal transduction systems...
  8. pmc Rewiring the specificity of two-component signal transduction systems
    Jeffrey M Skerker
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cell 133:1043-54. 2008
    ....
  9. doi Spatial tethering of kinases to their substrates relaxes evolutionary constraints on specificity
    Emily J Capra
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Mol Microbiol 86:1393-403. 2012
    ..More generally, our results shed light on how the spatial properties of signalling pathways can significantly affect their evolution, with additional implications for the design of synthetic signalling systems...
  10. pmc Modularity of the bacterial cell cycle enables independent spatial and temporal control of DNA replication
    Kristina Jonas
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Curr Biol 21:1092-101. 2011
    ..Complex regulatory circuits in biology are often built of simpler subcircuits or modules. In most cases, the functional consequences and evolutionary origins of modularity remain poorly defined...
  11. pmc A cell-type-specific protein-protein interaction modulates transcriptional activity of a master regulator in Caulobacter crescentus
    Kasia G Gora
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Mol Cell 39:455-67. 2010
    ..CtrA is thus tightly regulated by a protein-protein interaction which is critical to cell-cycle progression...
  12. pmc Spatial gradient of protein phosphorylation underlies replicative asymmetry in a bacterium
    Y Erin Chen
    Department of Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:1052-7. 2011
    ..More generally, our results demonstrate that uniform protein abundance may belie gradients and other sophisticated spatial patterns of protein activity in bacterial cells...
  13. ncbi Phosphotransfer profiling: systematic mapping of two-component signal transduction pathways and phosphorelays
    Michael T Laub
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Methods Enzymol 423:531-48. 2007
    ..The technique can be further extended to mapping phosphorelays and the cognate partners of histidine phosphotransferases. Here, we describe protocols and strategies for the successful implementation of this system-level technique...
  14. pmc Determinants of homodimerization specificity in histidine kinases
    Orr Ashenberg
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    J Mol Biol 413:222-35. 2011
    ..EnvZ and RstB likely diverged following gene duplication to yield two homodimers that cannot heterodimerize, and the mutants we identified represent possible evolutionary intermediates in this process...
  15. pmc Regulated proteolysis of a transcription factor complex is critical to cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus
    Kasia G Gora
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Mol Microbiol 87:1277-89. 2013
    ....
  16. pmc Direct and adaptor-mediated substrate recognition by an essential AAA+ protease
    Peter Chien
    Department of Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6590-5. 2007
    ....
  17. pmc Adaptive mutations that prevent crosstalk enable the expansion of paralogous signaling protein families
    Emily J Capra
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cell 150:222-32. 2012
    ..Our work may help explain the apparent ease with which paralogous protein families expanded in all organisms...
  18. ncbi Specificity in two-component signal transduction pathways
    Michael T Laub
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 41:121-45. 2007
    ....
  19. pmc A DNA damage checkpoint in Caulobacter crescentus inhibits cell division through a direct interaction with FtsW
    Joshua W Modell
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
    Genes Dev 25:1328-43. 2011
    ..Instead, we provide evidence that SidA inhibits division by binding directly to FtsW to prevent the final constriction of the cytokinetic ring...
  20. ncbi Cell-cycle progression and the generation of asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus
    Jeffrey M Skerker
    Bauer Center for Genomics Research, 7 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 2:325-37. 2004
  21. doi Using analyses of amino Acid coevolution to understand protein structure and function
    Orr Ashenberg
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    Methods Enzymol 523:191-212. 2013
    ..We provide practical suggestions for each step of the process including assembly of protein sequences, construction of a multiple sequence alignment, measurement of covariation, and analysis of results...
  22. pmc Proteotoxic Stress Induces a Cell-Cycle Arrest by Stimulating Lon to Degrade the Replication Initiator DnaA
    Kristina Jonas
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Cell 154:623-36. 2013
    ..Our work reveals a mechanism for regulating DNA replication under adverse growth conditions. Additionally, our data indicate that unfolded proteins can actively and directly alter substrate recognition by cellular proteases. ..
  23. ncbi Evolution of two-component signal transduction systems
    Emily J Capra
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 02139, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 66:325-47. 2012
    ....
  24. ncbi Systems biology of Caulobacter
    Michael T Laub
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 41:429-41. 2007
    ....