Randy L Buckner

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Structure-function correlates of cognitive decline in aging
    Jonas Persson
    Department of Psychology, Umea University, S 901 87 Umea, Sweden
    Cereb Cortex 16:907-15. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint An automated labeling system for subdividing the human cerebral cortex on MRI scans into gyral based regions of interest
    Rahul S Desikan
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 715 Albany Street, W701, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    Neuroimage 31:968-80. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Unrest at rest: default activity and spontaneous network correlations
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, and Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 37:1091-6; discussion 1097-9. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Self-projection and the brain
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 11:49-57. 2007
  5. doi request reprint The brain's default network: anatomy, function, and relevance to disease
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Drive, Cambridge, MA 02148, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:1-38. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Functional-anatomic correlates of remembering and knowing
    Mark E Wheeler
    Department of Psychology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuroimage 21:1337-49. 2004
  7. pmc Disruption of large-scale brain systems in advanced aging
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 56:924-35. 2007
  8. pmc The dynamics of cortical and hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer disease
    Mert R Sabuncu
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, 02129, USA
    Arch Neurol 68:1040-8. 2011
  9. pmc Distinct cortical anatomy linked to subregions of the medial temporal lobe revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Itamar Kahn
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:129-39. 2008
  10. pmc Functional-anatomic fractionation of the brain's default network
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 65:550-62. 2010

Detail Information

Publications86

  1. ncbi request reprint Structure-function correlates of cognitive decline in aging
    Jonas Persson
    Department of Psychology, Umea University, S 901 87 Umea, Sweden
    Cereb Cortex 16:907-15. 2006
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint An automated labeling system for subdividing the human cerebral cortex on MRI scans into gyral based regions of interest
    Rahul S Desikan
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 715 Albany Street, W701, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    Neuroimage 31:968-80. 2006
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Unrest at rest: default activity and spontaneous network correlations
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, and Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 37:1091-6; discussion 1097-9. 2007
    ..Maps of spontaneous network correlations also provide tools for functional localization and study of comparative anatomy between primate species. For all of these reasons, we advocate the systematic exploration of rest activity...
  4. ncbi request reprint Self-projection and the brain
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 11:49-57. 2007
    ....
  5. doi request reprint The brain's default network: anatomy, function, and relevance to disease
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Drive, Cambridge, MA 02148, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:1-38. 2008
    ..We conclude by discussing the relevance of the default network for understanding mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease...
  6. ncbi request reprint Functional-anatomic correlates of remembering and knowing
    Mark E Wheeler
    Department of Psychology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuroimage 21:1337-49. 2004
    ..Remembering additionally recruits regions specific to retrieved content, which may participate to convey the vividness typical of recollective experience...
  7. pmc Disruption of large-scale brain systems in advanced aging
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 56:924-35. 2007
    ..These results suggest that cognitive decline in normal aging arises from functional disruption in the coordination of large-scale brain systems that support cognition...
  8. pmc The dynamics of cortical and hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer disease
    Mert R Sabuncu
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, 02129, USA
    Arch Neurol 68:1040-8. 2011
    ..To characterize rates of regional Alzheimer disease (AD)-specific brain atrophy across the presymptomatic, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia stages...
  9. pmc Distinct cortical anatomy linked to subregions of the medial temporal lobe revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Itamar Kahn
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:129-39. 2008
    ..The cortical pathways include regions that have undergone considerable areal expansion in humans, providing insight into how the MTL memory system has evolved to support a diverse array of cognitive domains...
  10. pmc Functional-anatomic fractionation of the brain's default network
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 65:550-62. 2010
    ..During certain experimentally directed and spontaneous acts of future-oriented thought, these dissociated components are simultaneously engaged, presumably to facilitate construction of mental models of personally significant events...
  11. ncbi request reprint Preserved neural correlates of priming in old age and dementia
    Cindy Lustig
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    Neuron 42:865-75. 2004
    ....
  12. pmc Cortical hubs revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity: mapping, assessment of stability, and relation to Alzheimer's disease
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 29:1860-73. 2009
    ....
  13. pmc Amyloid-β associated cortical thinning in clinically normal elderly
    J Alex Becker
    Department of Radiology, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Ann Neurol 69:1032-42. 2011
    ....
  14. pmc Cognitive profile of amyloid burden and white matter hyperintensities in cognitively normal older adults
    Trey Hedden
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Neurosci 32:16233-42. 2012
    ..These findings suggest that even before clinical impairment, amyloid burden and WMH likely represent neuropathological cascades with distinct etiologies and dissociable influences on cognition...
  15. ncbi request reprint A unified approach for morphometric and functional data analysis in young, old, and demented adults using automated atlas-based head size normalization: reliability and validation against manual measurement of total intracranial volume
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, HHMI at Washington University, Campus Box 1125, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuroimage 23:724-38. 2004
    ..Thus, atlas normalization provides a common framework for both morphometric and functional data analysis...
  16. pmc Correlated low-frequency BOLD fluctuations in the resting human brain are modulated by recent experience in category-preferential visual regions
    W Dale Stevens
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cereb Cortex 20:1997-2006. 2010
    ....
  17. pmc Repetition priming influences distinct brain systems: evidence from task-evoked data and resting-state correlations
    Gagan S Wig
    Harvard University, Department of Psychology, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 101:2632-48. 2009
    ..These results thus explain the long-known dissociation between perceptual and conceptual components of priming by revealing how a single experience can separately influence distinct, concurrently active brain systems...
  18. pmc Evidence for the default network's role in spontaneous cognition
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 104:322-35. 2010
    ..Collectively, these results suggest that during passive states, activity within the default network reflects spontaneous, internally directed cognitive processes...
  19. ncbi request reprint Evidence for frontally mediated controlled processing differences in older adults
    Katerina Velanova
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Cereb Cortex 17:1033-46. 2007
    ....
  20. pmc The association between a polygenic Alzheimer score and cortical thickness in clinically normal subjects
    Mert R Sabuncu
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Cereb Cortex 22:2653-61. 2012
    ....
  21. pmc The organization of the human cerebellum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 106:2322-45. 2011
    ..The orderly topography of the representations suggests that the cerebellum possesses at least two large, homotopic maps of the full cerebrum and possibly a smaller third map...
  22. pmc Intrinsic functional connectivity as a tool for human connectomics: theory, properties, and optimization
    Koene R A van Dijk
    Harvard University Center for Brain Science, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 103:297-321. 2010
    ..We conclude by discussing the strengths and limitations of fcMRI and how it can be combined with HARDI techniques to support the emerging field of human connectomics...
  23. pmc Individual differences in amygdala-medial prefrontal anatomy link negative affect, impaired social functioning, and polygenic depression risk
    Avram J Holmes
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 32:18087-100. 2012
    ..Individual differences in this circuitry may arise, in part, from common genetic variability that contributes to risk for MDD...
  24. pmc Failure to modulate attentional control in advanced aging linked to white matter pathology
    Trey Hedden
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Cereb Cortex 22:1038-51. 2012
    ..These results suggest failure to modulate frontal and parietal activity reflects a disruptive process in advanced aging associated with specific neuropathologic processes...
  25. pmc Automated MRI measures identify individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease
    Rahul S Desikan
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Brain 132:2048-57. 2009
    ....
  26. pmc Regional white matter volume differences in nondemented aging and Alzheimer's disease
    David H Salat
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA, USA
    Neuroimage 44:1247-58. 2009
    ..Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of automated regional WM measures in revealing the distinct patterns of age and AD associated volume loss that may contribute to cognitive decline...
  27. doi request reprint The role of the hippocampus in prediction and imagination
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 61:27-48, C1-8. 2010
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint Thinning of the cerebral cortex in aging
    David H Salat
    MGH MIT HMS Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA
    Cereb Cortex 14:721-30. 2004
    ..These findings demonstrate that cortical thinning occurs by middle age and spans widespread cortical regions that include primary as well as association cortex...
  29. ncbi request reprint Evidence for neural effects of repetition that directly correlate with behavioral priming
    Luigi Maccotta
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 16:1625-32. 2004
    ..The finding of a quantitative relation between neural and behavioral effects in frontal regions suggests that repetition reduces frontally mediated processing in a manner that ultimately facilitates behavior...
  30. doi request reprint Episodic simulation of future events: concepts, data, and applications
    Daniel L Schacter
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:39-60. 2008
    ..These processes together comprise what we have termed "the prospective brain," whose primary function is to use past experiences to anticipate future events...
  31. pmc Segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Fenna M Krienen
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cereb Cortex 19:2485-97. 2009
    ..We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex...
  32. pmc The influence of head motion on intrinsic functional connectivity MRI
    Koene R A van Dijk
    Harvard University Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 59:431-8. 2012
    ..These effects are important to consider when interpreting variation between groups and across individuals...
  33. pmc Disruption of functional connectivity in clinically normal older adults harboring amyloid burden
    Trey Hedden
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Neurosci 29:12686-94. 2009
    ....
  34. pmc Evidence from intrinsic activity that asymmetry of the human brain is controlled by multiple factors
    Hesheng Liu
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:20499-503. 2009
    ..These findings show the feasibility of measuring brain asymmetry using intrinsic activity fluctuations and suggest that multiple genetic or environmental mechanisms control cerebral lateralization...
  35. pmc Functional connectivity of the macaque posterior parahippocampal cortex
    Justin L Vincent
    1Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 103:793-800. 2010
    ..By specifying the location of the putative macaque homologue in parietal cortex, we provide a target for future physiological exploration of this area's role in mnemonic or alternative processes...
  36. pmc Clan mentality: evidence that the medial prefrontal cortex responds to close others
    Fenna M Krienen
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 30:13906-15. 2010
    ..These results encourage further exploration of the idea that frontal systems linked with limbic circuits facilitate assessment of the relevance or personal significance in social contexts...
  37. ncbi request reprint Functional-anatomic correlates of sustained and transient processing components engaged during controlled retrieval
    Katerina Velanova
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    J Neurosci 23:8460-70. 2003
    ..In particular, right frontal-polar cortex involvement in sustained processes reconciles a number of disparate findings that have arisen when contrasting blocked-trial paradigms with event-related paradigms...
  38. ncbi request reprint Frontal-hippocampal double dissociation between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease
    Denise Head
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, One Brookings Drive, Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Cereb Cortex 15:732-9. 2005
    ..A separate process, ubiquitous in aging, affects brain white matter with an anterior-to-posterior gradient and may underlie the executive difficulties common in aging...
  39. doi request reprint Opportunities and limitations of intrinsic functional connectivity MRI
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Neurosci 16:832-7. 2013
    ..Critically to study of between-group differences, fcMRI is sensitive to head motion and to differences in the mental states of participants during the scans. We discuss the potential of fcMRI in the context of its limitations. ..
  40. pmc Cerebellar asymmetry and its relation to cerebral asymmetry estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Danhong Wang
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Neurophysiol 109:46-57. 2013
    ....
  41. pmc The organization of the human striatum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Eun Young Choi
    Program in Neuroscience, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Neurophysiol 108:2242-63. 2012
    ..The resulting estimates of striatal organization provide a reference for exploring how the striatum contributes to processing motor, limbic, and heteromodal information through multiple large-scale corticostriatal circuits...
  42. doi request reprint Efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targets for depression is related to intrinsic functional connectivity with the subgenual cingulate
    Michael D Fox
    Partners Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 72:595-603. 2012
    ..Recent data suggest that some left DLPFC targets are more effective than others; however, the reasons for this heterogeneity and how to capitalize on this information remain unclear...
  43. pmc The organization of the human cerebral cortex estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    B T Thomas Yeo
    Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 106:1125-65. 2011
    ..We conclude by discussing the organization of these large-scale cerebral networks in relation to monkey anatomy and their potential evolutionary expansion in humans to support cognition...
  44. pmc Characterization of the functional MRI response temporal linearity via optical control of neocortical pyramidal neurons
    Itamar Kahn
    Center for Brain Science and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 31:15086-91. 2011
    ..These results illustrate the potential of the opto-fMRI method and reinforce the critical assumption of human functional neuroimaging that--to first approximation--the BOLD response tracks local neural activity levels...
  45. ncbi request reprint Functional-anatomic correlates of individual differences in memory
    Brenda A Kirchhoff
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, Campus Box 1125, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, Missouri 63130, and Martinos Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129, USA
    Neuron 51:263-74. 2006
    ..This study reveals functional-anatomic correlates of verbal and perceptual strategies that are variably used by individuals during encoding. These strategies engage distinct brain regions and may separately influence memory performance...
  46. ncbi request reprint Hemodynamic responses in visual, motor, and somatosensory cortices in schizophrenia
    Deanna M Barch
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuroimage 20:1884-93. 2003
    ..These results begin to validate the interpretation of functional neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia in terms of neuronal as opposed to vascular mechanisms...
  47. pmc Functional deactivations: change with age and dementia of the Alzheimer type
    Cindy Lustig
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:14504-9. 2003
    ....
  48. pmc Localization of focal epileptic discharges using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging
    Steven M Stufflebeam
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurosurg 114:1693-7. 2011
    ..The object of this study was to investigate whether the degree of coupling of spontaneous brain activity as measured with functional connectivity MR imaging (fcMR imaging) can accurately identify and localize epileptic discharges...
  49. ncbi request reprint Spelling via semantics and phonology: exploring the effects of age, Alzheimer's disease, and primary semantic impairment
    Michael J Cortese
    Department of Psychology, Morehead State University, 601 Ginger Hall, Morehead, KY 40351, USA
    Neuropsychologia 41:952-67. 2003
    ..We propose that deficits in attentional control (i.e. selection) underlie performance in DAT whereas disruption of semantic representations underlies performance in PSI...
  50. ncbi request reprint Neural correlates of incongruous visual information. An event-related fMRI study
    Pascale Michelon
    Department of Psychology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 1125, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130 4899, USA
    Neuroimage 19:1612-26. 2003
    ..We interpret our results as suggesting that, although correlates of a surprise response can be observed, better memory for incongruous visual information is attributable mainly to more processing and, consequently, better encoding...
  51. pmc Amyloid deposition is associated with impaired default network function in older persons without dementia
    Reisa A Sperling
    Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Neuron 63:178-88. 2009
    ....
  52. pmc Predicting the location of entorhinal cortex from MRI
    Bruce Fischl
    Athinoula A Martinos Center, Department of Radiology, MGH, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neuroimage 47:8-17. 2009
    ....
  53. pmc Evidence for a frontoparietal control system revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Justin L Vincent
    Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:3328-42. 2008
    ..The frontoparietal control system is therefore anatomically positioned to integrate information from these two opposing brain systems...
  54. pmc The cortical signature of Alzheimer's disease: regionally specific cortical thinning relates to symptom severity in very mild to mild AD dementia and is detectable in asymptomatic amyloid-positive individuals
    Bradford C Dickerson
    Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Cereb Cortex 19:497-510. 2009
    ....
  55. pmc The organization of local and distant functional connectivity in the human brain
    Jorge Sepulcre
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 6:e1000808. 2010
    ..We discuss the implications of these observations and applications of the present method for exploring normal and atypical brain function...
  56. pmc Differential effects of aging and Alzheimer's disease on medial temporal lobe cortical thickness and surface area
    Bradford C Dickerson
    Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 30:432-40. 2009
    ..These differential morphometric effects of aging and AD may reflect distinct biologic processes and ultimately may provide insights into the anatomic substrates of change in memory-related functions of MTL cortex...
  57. ncbi request reprint Remembering the past to imagine the future: the prospective brain
    Daniel L Schacter
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 8:657-61. 2007
    ..We suggest that processes such as memory can be productively re-conceptualized in light of this idea...
  58. ncbi request reprint Memory and executive function in aging and AD: multiple factors that cause decline and reserve factors that compensate
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University in St Louis, Department of Psychology, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1125, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuron 44:195-208. 2004
    ..Functional imaging studies, in particular, suggest increased recruitment of brain areas in older adults that may reflect a form of compensation...
  59. doi request reprint The serendipitous discovery of the brain's default network
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 62:1137-45. 2012
    ..Later, its presence was shunned as evidence of an experimental confound. Finally, it emerged as a mainstream target of focused study. Here, I describe a personal perspective of the default network's serendipitous discovery...
  60. pmc Long-term memory for the terrorist attack of September 11: flashbulb memories, event memories, and the factors that influence their retention
    William Hirst
    Department of Psychology, New School for Social Research, New York, NY 10011, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 138:161-76. 2009
    ..The results are discussed in terms of community memory practices...
  61. ncbi request reprint Common prefrontal regions coactivate with dissociable posterior regions during controlled semantic and phonological tasks
    Brian T Gold
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuron 35:803-12. 2002
    ..These findings suggest that LIPC participates in controlled processing across multiple information domains collaborating with dissociable posterior regions depending upon the kind of information retrieved...
  62. ncbi request reprint Under-recruitment and nonselective recruitment: dissociable neural mechanisms associated with aging
    Jessica M Logan
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuron 33:827-40. 2002
    ..The former is reversible and potentially amenable to cognitive training; the latter may reflect a less malleable change associated with cognitive decline in advanced aging...
  63. ncbi request reprint Functional-anatomic correlates of control processes in memory
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    J Neurosci 23:3999-4004. 2003
  64. ncbi request reprint Frontally mediated control processes contribute to source memory retrieval
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Neuron 35:817-8. 2002
    ..In this issue of Neuron, Dobbins et al. present functional MRI (fMRI) data that shed insight into the specific, dissociated contributions of frontal regions to remembering...
  65. ncbi request reprint Differing neuropsychological and neuroanatomical correlates of abnormal reading in early-stage semantic dementia and dementia of the Alzheimer type
    Brian T Gold
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky, MN214 Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0298, USA
    Neuropsychologia 43:833-46. 2005
    ....
  66. ncbi request reprint Functional-anatomic correlates of memory retrieval that suggest nontraditional processing roles for multiple distinct regions within posterior parietal cortex
    Benjamin J Shannon
    Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    J Neurosci 24:10084-92. 2004
    ..PPC regions thus have prominent response properties associated with memory, which may arise through interactions with medial temporal cortex...
  67. ncbi request reprint Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS): cross-sectional MRI data in young, middle aged, nondemented, and demented older adults
    Daniel S Marcus
    Washington University, MO 63110, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 19:1498-507. 2007
    ..Automated calculation of whole-brain volume and estimated total intracranial volume are presented to demonstrate use of the data for measuring differences associated with normal aging and Alzheimer's disease...
  68. ncbi request reprint Mixed blocked/event-related designs separate transient and sustained activity in fMRI
    Kristina M Visscher
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuroimage 19:1694-708. 2003
    ..Mixed designs can allow researchers a means to examine brain activity associated with sustained processes, potentially related to task-level control signals...
  69. ncbi request reprint Differential vulnerability of anterior white matter in nondemented aging with minimal acceleration in dementia of the Alzheimer type: evidence from diffusion tensor imaging
    Denise Head
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Cereb Cortex 14:410-23. 2004
    ..The dissociation between the regional effects of age and dementia status suggests that the mechanisms underlying age-associated cognitive decline are likely distinct from those underlying DAT...
  70. ncbi request reprint Functional dissociation among components of remembering: control, perceived oldness, and content
    Mark E Wheeler
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    J Neurosci 23:3869-80. 2003
    ..Frontal regions may contribute to control processes that interact with different posterior regions that contribute a signal that information is old and support the contents of retrieval...
  71. ncbi request reprint The feasibility of a common stereotactic space for children and adults in fMRI studies of development
    E Darcy Burgund
    Department of Neurology, Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Neuroimage 17:184-200. 2002
    ....
  72. ncbi request reprint Parietal lobe contributions to episodic memory retrieval
    Anthony D Wagner
    Department of Psychology and Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 9:445-53. 2005
    ..We conclude by proposing three hypotheses concerning how parietal cortex might contribute to memory...
  73. ncbi request reprint Changing frontal contributions to memory before and after medial temporal lobectomy
    Luigi Maccotta
    Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Cereb Cortex 17:443-56. 2007
    ..Such differences emerged in specific task settings and were influenced by surgery, suggesting a dynamic mechanism of frontal recruitment that can be obtained in TLE patients, possibly as a response to presurgical dysfunction...
  74. ncbi request reprint Orthographic distinctiveness and semantic elaboration provide separate contributions to memory
    Brenda A Kirchhoff
    Psychology Department, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 17:1841-54. 2005
    ..Orthographic distinctiveness and semantic elaboration appear to have separate behavioral and functional-anatomic contributions to memory...
  75. ncbi request reprint Coherent spontaneous activity identifies a hippocampal-parietal memory network
    Justin L Vincent
    Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, and Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4525 Scott Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    J Neurophysiol 96:3517-31. 2006
    ..These regions showed greater activity to successfully recollected items as compared with other trial types. Together, these results associate specific regions of parietal cortex that are sensitive to successful recollection with the HF...
  76. ncbi request reprint Cortical surface shape analysis based on spherical wavelets
    Peng Yu
    Harvard MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology HST, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
    IEEE Trans Med Imaging 26:582-97. 2007
    ..The cortical folding development model provides quantitative anatomic information regarding macroscopic cortical folding development and may be of potential use as a biomarker for early diagnosis of neurologic deficits in newborns...
  77. ncbi request reprint Does the right hemisphere take over after damage to Broca's area? the Barlow case of 1877 and its history
    Stanley Finger
    Washington University, Campus Box 1125, St Louis, MO 63130 4899, USA
    Brain Lang 85:385-95. 2003
    ..Whether this case really provides good support for functional takeover or vicariation theory is critically evaluated in the light of contemporary research, including PET scan studies involving damage to Broca's speech region...
  78. doi request reprint Brain volume decline in aging: evidence for a relation between socioeconomic status, preclinical Alzheimer disease, and reserve
    Anthony F Fotenos
    Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Arch Neurol 65:113-20. 2008
    ..To assess the relation between socioeconomic status (SES) and structural brain change in nondemented older adults and to ascertain the potential role of preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD)...
  79. ncbi request reprint The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit: an informatics platform for managing, exploring, and sharing neuroimaging data
    Daniel S Marcus
    Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Neuroinformatics 5:11-34. 2007
    ..By managing data with XNAT, laboratories are prepared to better maintain the long-term integrity of their data, to explore emergent relations across data types, and to share their data with the broader neuroimaging community...
  80. ncbi request reprint Imaging of Alzheimer's disease
    Benjamin C P Lee
    Department of Radiology, Alzheimer s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    J Neuroimaging 13:199-214. 2003
    ....
  81. ncbi request reprint Effects of left inferior prefrontal stimulation on episodic memory formation: a two-stage fMRI-rTMS study
    Stefan Köhler
    Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
    J Cogn Neurosci 16:178-88. 2004
    ..Physiological processes of facilitation probably also contributed to the observed memory benefit. Together, these findings suggest that LIPFC does play a causal role in episodic memory formation...
  82. ncbi request reprint The potion's magic
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130 USA
    Neuron 42:526-7. 2004
    ..These data provide evidence of sensory-specific reactivation of olfactory cortex during remembering...
  83. ncbi request reprint White matter lesions are prevalent but differentially related with cognition in aging and early Alzheimer disease
    Jeffrey M Burns
    Department of Neurology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Arch Neurol 62:1870-6. 2005
    ..White matter lesions (WMLs) are prevalent in nondemented aging and in Alzheimer disease (AD). Their relationship with cognition in the earliest stages of AD is unknown...
  84. ncbi request reprint Common and dissociable activation patterns associated with controlled semantic and phonological processing: evidence from FMRI adaptation
    Brian T Gold
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Chandler Medical Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
    Cereb Cortex 15:1438-50. 2005
    ....
  85. ncbi request reprint Evidence for separate perceptual reactivation and search processes during remembering
    Mark E Wheeler
    Department of Radiology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Cereb Cortex 16:949-59. 2006
    ..These findings indicate a role in integrating perceptual reactivation and search processes during remembering...
  86. ncbi request reprint Molecular, structural, and functional characterization of Alzheimer's disease: evidence for a relationship between default activity, amyloid, and memory
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63105, USA
    J Neurosci 25:7709-17. 2005
    ..These cortical regions may be part of a network with the medial temporal lobe whose disruption contributes to memory impairment...