Randy Buckner

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The role of the hippocampus in prediction and imagination
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 61:27-48, C1-8. 2010
  2. pmc The organization of the human striatum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Eun Young Choi
    Program in Neuroscience, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Neurophysiol 108:2242-63. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Opportunities and limitations of intrinsic functional connectivity MRI
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Neurosci 16:832-7. 2013
  4. doi request reprint The serendipitous discovery of the brain's default network
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 62:1137-45. 2012
  5. pmc The organization of the human cerebellum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 106:2322-45. 2011
  6. pmc Cortical hubs revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity: mapping, assessment of stability, and relation to Alzheimer's disease
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 29:1860-73. 2009
  7. pmc Functional-anatomic fractionation of the brain's default network
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 65:550-62. 2010
  8. pmc Disruption of large-scale brain systems in advanced aging
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 56:924-35. 2007
  9. pmc The organization of local and distant functional connectivity in the human brain
    Jorge Sepulcre
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 6:e1000808. 2010
  10. pmc Clan mentality: evidence that the medial prefrontal cortex responds to close others
    Fenna M Krienen
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 30:13906-15. 2010

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. doi request reprint The role of the hippocampus in prediction and imagination
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 61:27-48, C1-8. 2010
    ....
  2. pmc The organization of the human striatum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Eun Young Choi
    Program in Neuroscience, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Neurophysiol 108:2242-63. 2012
    ..The resulting estimates of striatal organization provide a reference for exploring how the striatum contributes to processing motor, limbic, and heteromodal information through multiple large-scale corticostriatal circuits...
  3. doi request reprint Opportunities and limitations of intrinsic functional connectivity MRI
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, USA
    Nat Neurosci 16:832-7. 2013
    ..Critically to study of between-group differences, fcMRI is sensitive to head motion and to differences in the mental states of participants during the scans. We discuss the potential of fcMRI in the context of its limitations. ..
  4. doi request reprint The serendipitous discovery of the brain's default network
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 62:1137-45. 2012
    ..Later, its presence was shunned as evidence of an experimental confound. Finally, it emerged as a mainstream target of focused study. Here, I describe a personal perspective of the default network's serendipitous discovery...
  5. pmc The organization of the human cerebellum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Randy L Buckner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 106:2322-45. 2011
    ..The orderly topography of the representations suggests that the cerebellum possesses at least two large, homotopic maps of the full cerebrum and possibly a smaller third map...
  6. pmc Cortical hubs revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity: mapping, assessment of stability, and relation to Alzheimer's disease
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 29:1860-73. 2009
    ....
  7. pmc Functional-anatomic fractionation of the brain's default network
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 65:550-62. 2010
    ..During certain experimentally directed and spontaneous acts of future-oriented thought, these dissociated components are simultaneously engaged, presumably to facilitate construction of mental models of personally significant events...
  8. pmc Disruption of large-scale brain systems in advanced aging
    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Neuron 56:924-35. 2007
    ..These results suggest that cognitive decline in normal aging arises from functional disruption in the coordination of large-scale brain systems that support cognition...
  9. pmc The organization of local and distant functional connectivity in the human brain
    Jorge Sepulcre
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 6:e1000808. 2010
    ..We discuss the implications of these observations and applications of the present method for exploring normal and atypical brain function...
  10. pmc Clan mentality: evidence that the medial prefrontal cortex responds to close others
    Fenna M Krienen
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurosci 30:13906-15. 2010
    ..These results encourage further exploration of the idea that frontal systems linked with limbic circuits facilitate assessment of the relevance or personal significance in social contexts...
  11. pmc Functional connectivity of the macaque posterior parahippocampal cortex
    Justin L Vincent
    1Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 103:793-800. 2010
    ..By specifying the location of the putative macaque homologue in parietal cortex, we provide a target for future physiological exploration of this area's role in mnemonic or alternative processes...
  12. pmc Disruption of functional connectivity in clinically normal older adults harboring amyloid burden
    Trey Hedden
    Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Neurosci 29:12686-94. 2009
    ....
  13. pmc Amyloid deposition is associated with impaired default network function in older persons without dementia
    Reisa A Sperling
    Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Neuron 63:178-88. 2009
    ....
  14. pmc Segregated fronto-cerebellar circuits revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Fenna M Krienen
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cereb Cortex 19:2485-97. 2009
    ..We conclude by providing a provisional map of the topography of the cerebellum based on functional correlations with the frontal cortex...
  15. pmc Predicting the location of entorhinal cortex from MRI
    Bruce Fischl
    Athinoula A Martinos Center, Department of Radiology, MGH, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    Neuroimage 47:8-17. 2009
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Self-projection and the brain
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 11:49-57. 2007
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Unrest at rest: default activity and spontaneous network correlations
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, and Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge 02138, USA
    Neuroimage 37:1091-6; discussion 1097-9. 2007
    ..Maps of spontaneous network correlations also provide tools for functional localization and study of comparative anatomy between primate species. For all of these reasons, we advocate the systematic exploration of rest activity...
  18. ncbi request reprint Remembering the past to imagine the future: the prospective brain
    Daniel L Schacter
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 8:657-61. 2007
    ..We suggest that processes such as memory can be productively re-conceptualized in light of this idea...
  19. pmc Distinct cortical anatomy linked to subregions of the medial temporal lobe revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Itamar Kahn
    Department of Psychology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:129-39. 2008
    ..The cortical pathways include regions that have undergone considerable areal expansion in humans, providing insight into how the MTL memory system has evolved to support a diverse array of cognitive domains...
  20. doi request reprint The brain's default network: anatomy, function, and relevance to disease
    Randy L Buckner
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Drive, Cambridge, MA 02148, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:1-38. 2008
    ..We conclude by discussing the relevance of the default network for understanding mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease...
  21. doi request reprint Episodic simulation of future events: concepts, data, and applications
    Daniel L Schacter
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1124:39-60. 2008
    ..These processes together comprise what we have termed "the prospective brain," whose primary function is to use past experiences to anticipate future events...
  22. pmc The cortical signature of Alzheimer's disease: regionally specific cortical thinning relates to symptom severity in very mild to mild AD dementia and is detectable in asymptomatic amyloid-positive individuals
    Bradford C Dickerson
    Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA
    Cereb Cortex 19:497-510. 2009
    ....
  23. pmc Evidence for a frontoparietal control system revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity
    Justin L Vincent
    Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:3328-42. 2008
    ..The frontoparietal control system is therefore anatomically positioned to integrate information from these two opposing brain systems...
  24. pmc Regional white matter volume differences in nondemented aging and Alzheimer's disease
    David H Salat
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA, USA
    Neuroimage 44:1247-58. 2009
    ..Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of automated regional WM measures in revealing the distinct patterns of age and AD associated volume loss that may contribute to cognitive decline...
  25. pmc Repetition priming influences distinct brain systems: evidence from task-evoked data and resting-state correlations
    Gagan S Wig
    Harvard University, Department of Psychology, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 101:2632-48. 2009
    ..These results thus explain the long-known dissociation between perceptual and conceptual components of priming by revealing how a single experience can separately influence distinct, concurrently active brain systems...
  26. ncbi request reprint Thinning of the cerebral cortex in aging
    David H Salat
    MGH MIT HMS Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA
    Cereb Cortex 14:721-30. 2004
    ..These findings demonstrate that cortical thinning occurs by middle age and spans widespread cortical regions that include primary as well as association cortex...
  27. pmc Intrinsic functional connectivity as a tool for human connectomics: theory, properties, and optimization
    Koene R A van Dijk
    Harvard University Center for Brain Science, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 103:297-321. 2010
    ..We conclude by discussing the strengths and limitations of fcMRI and how it can be combined with HARDI techniques to support the emerging field of human connectomics...
  28. pmc The organization of the human cerebral cortex estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity
    B T Thomas Yeo
    Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Neurophysiol 106:1125-65. 2011
    ..We conclude by discussing the organization of these large-scale cerebral networks in relation to monkey anatomy and their potential evolutionary expansion in humans to support cognition...

Research Grants12

  1. Neural Processes Underlying Cognitive Aging
    Randy L Buckner; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Here we seek to understand the brain factors in normal aging that impair cognition as well as compensate to mitigate cognitive decline. By understanding these factors we hope to promote healthy, graceful aging. ..
  2. Functional-anatomic exploration of cognitive control
    Randy Buckner; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. Functional-anatomic exploration of cognitive control
    Randy Buckner; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  4. FUNCTIONAL ANATOMIC EXPLORATION OF TASK REPETITION
    Randy Buckner; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..It thus seems likely that the principles by which normal brains are able to facilitate task performance and acquire new skills will extend to how the damaged brain acquires skills that were lost. ..