FREDERICK AUSUBEL

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Are innate immune signaling pathways in plants and animals conserved?
    Frederick M Ausubel
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Nat Immunol 6:973-9. 2005
  2. pmc Genomic analysis reveals that Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence is combinatorial
    Daniel G Lee
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Genome Biol 7:R90. 2006
  3. pmc Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host for Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis
    Costi D Sifri
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 71:2208-17. 2003
  4. pmc Distinct pathogenesis and host responses during infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus
    Javier E Irazoqui
    Program of Developmental Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1000982. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Caenorhabditis elegans as a host for the study of host-pathogen interactions
    Alejandro Aballay
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 5:97-101. 2002
  6. pmc Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases reveals a role for bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-GMP in virulence
    Hemantha Kulasakara
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:2839-44. 2006
  7. pmc A metasystem of framework model organisms to study emergence of new host-microbe adaptations
    Suresh Gopalan
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS ONE 3:e3891. 2008
  8. pmc RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM 1, a dominant Arabidopsis disease-resistance gene, is not race specific
    Andrew C Diener
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Genetics 171:305-21. 2005
  9. pmc Identification of virulence genes in a pathogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by representational difference analysis
    Ji Young Choi
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:952-61. 2002
  10. pmc Role for beta-catenin and HOX transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian host epithelial-pathogen interactions
    Javier E Irazoqui
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:17469-74. 2008

Research Grants

  1. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2007
  2. Novel whole-animal screens for anti-microbials
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. Studies of Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2007
  4. Novel whole-animal screens for anti-microbials
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2009
  5. Studies of Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2009
  6. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2004
  7. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 1993
  8. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2000
  9. Identifying novel anti-infectives by high through-put screening in whole animals
    Frederick M Ausubel; Fiscal Year: 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications67

  1. ncbi request reprint Are innate immune signaling pathways in plants and animals conserved?
    Frederick M Ausubel
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Nat Immunol 6:973-9. 2005
    ....
  2. pmc Genomic analysis reveals that Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence is combinatorial
    Daniel G Lee
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Genome Biol 7:R90. 2006
    ..We therefore sequenced a highly virulent strain of P. aeruginosa, PA14, and compared it with a previously sequenced (and less pathogenic) strain, PAO1, to identify novel virulence genes...
  3. pmc Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host for Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis
    Costi D Sifri
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 71:2208-17. 2003
    ..These results suggest that key aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis have been conserved, irrespective of the host, and that specific C. elegans host factors can alter susceptibility to this gram-positive human pathogen...
  4. pmc Distinct pathogenesis and host responses during infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus
    Javier E Irazoqui
    Program of Developmental Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1000982. 2010
    ..aeruginosa nor the S. aureus-triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with potentially conserved roles also in mammals...
  5. ncbi request reprint Caenorhabditis elegans as a host for the study of host-pathogen interactions
    Alejandro Aballay
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 5:97-101. 2002
    ..elegans mutants that exhibit altered susceptibility to pathogen attack. The use of Caenorhabditis elegans as the host for a variety of human pathogens is discussed...
  6. pmc Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases reveals a role for bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-GMP in virulence
    Hemantha Kulasakara
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:2839-44. 2006
    ....
  7. pmc A metasystem of framework model organisms to study emergence of new host-microbe adaptations
    Suresh Gopalan
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS ONE 3:e3891. 2008
    ..This would aid in the study of emergence and progression of host-microbe maladaptations in a controlled environment...
  8. pmc RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM 1, a dominant Arabidopsis disease-resistance gene, is not race specific
    Andrew C Diener
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Genetics 171:305-21. 2005
    ..matthioli, f. conglutinans, and f. raphani. Thus, RFO1 encodes a novel type of dominant disease-resistance protein that confers resistance to a broad spectrum of Fusarium races...
  9. pmc Identification of virulence genes in a pathogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by representational difference analysis
    Ji Young Choi
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:952-61. 2002
    ..This suggests that the increased virulence of P. aeruginosa strain PA14 compared to PAO1 may relate to specific genomic differences identifiable by RDA...
  10. pmc Role for beta-catenin and HOX transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian host epithelial-pathogen interactions
    Javier E Irazoqui
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:17469-74. 2008
    ..Overexpression of human homologs of egl-5 modulated NF-kappaB-dependent TLR2 signaling in epithelial cells. These data suggest that beta-catenin and homeobox genes play an important and conserved role in innate immune defense...
  11. pmc Virulence effect of Enterococcus faecalis protease genes and the quorum-sensing locus fsr in Caenorhabditis elegans and mice
    Costi D Sifri
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Infect Immun 70:5647-50. 2002
    ..These data show that extracellular proteases and the quorum-sensing fsr system are important for E. faecalis virulence in two highly divergent hosts: nematodes and mice...
  12. ncbi request reprint A conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity
    Dennis H Kim
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Science 297:623-6. 2002
    ..These data suggest that this MAP kinase signaling cassette represents an ancient feature of innate immune responses in evolutionarily diverse species...
  13. pmc p38 MAPK regulates expression of immune response genes and contributes to longevity in C. elegans
    Emily R Troemel
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Genet 2:e183. 2006
    ..The contribution of the PMK-1 pathway to the enhanced lifespan of daf-2 mutants suggests that innate immunity is an important determinant of longevity...
  14. pmc Identification of novel antimicrobials using a live-animal infection model
    Terence I Moy
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:10414-9. 2006
    ..Our findings indicate that the whole-animal C. elegans screen identifies not only traditional antibiotics, but also compounds that target bacterial virulence or stimulate host defense...
  15. pmc Cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide produced by Enterococcus faecium
    Terence I Moy
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 72:4512-20. 2004
    ..faecium-mediated killing. These results suggest that hydrogen peroxide produced by E. faecium has cytotoxic effects and highlight the utility of C. elegans pathogenicity models for identifying bacterial virulence factors...
  16. ncbi request reprint The art of serendipity: killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by human pathogens as a model of bacterial and fungal pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 55 Fruit Street, Gray 5, GRJ 504, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 1:167-73. 2003
    ..In contrast, the Caenorhabditis elegans model allows rapid identification of mutants in microbial genes associated with pathogenesis and then these phenotypes can be confirmed in a relevant mammalian model...
  17. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary perspectives on innate immunity from the study of Caenorhabditis elegans
    Dennis H Kim
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Curr Opin Immunol 17:4-10. 2005
    ..We anticipate that the study of pathogen resistance in C. elegans will continue to provide evolutionary and mechanistic insights into the signal transduction and physiology of innate immunity...
  18. pmc Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors identified by using a high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans-killing model
    Jakob Begun
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 73:872-7. 2005
    ..Interestingly, Tn917 was shown to have a very strong bias for insertions near the terminus of DNA replication...
  19. pmc Activation of defense response pathways by OGs and Flg22 elicitors in Arabidopsis seedlings
    Carine Denoux
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge St, Simches 7700, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mol Plant 1:423-45. 2008
    ..Expression patterns of amino-cyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response...
  20. ncbi request reprint Long-lived C. elegans daf-2 mutants are resistant to bacterial pathogens
    Danielle A Garsin
    Department of Genetics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Science 300:1921. 2003
  21. ncbi request reprint Conjugating berberine to a multidrug efflux pump inhibitor creates an effective antimicrobial
    Anthony R Ball
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 1:594-600. 2006
    ..The hybrid molecule showed good efficacy in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of enterococcal infection, curing worms of the pathogen...
  22. doi request reprint Models of Caenorhabditis elegans infection by bacterial and fungal pathogens
    Jennifer R Powell
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 415:403-27. 2008
    ..Here, we describe pathogen assays for a selection of the most commonly studied bacterial and fungal pathogens using the C. elegans model system...
  23. ncbi request reprint Arabidopsis local resistance to Botrytis cinerea involves salicylic acid and camalexin and requires EDS4 and PAD2, but not SID2, EDS5 or PAD4
    Simone Ferrari
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Plant J 35:193-205. 2003
    ..cinerea requires ethylene-, jasmonate-, and SA-mediated signaling, that the SA affecting this resistance does not require ICS1 and is likely synthesized via PAL, and that camalexin limits lesion development...
  24. pmc The Enterococcus faecalis fsrB gene, a key component of the fsr quorum-sensing system, is associated with virulence in the rabbit endophthalmitis model
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 70:4678-81. 2002
    ..Complementation of mutation restored virulence. These data corroborate the role of fsrB in E. faecalis pathogenesis and suggest that the rabbit endophthalmitis model can be used to study the in vivo role of quorum sensing...
  25. pmc Use of the Galleria mellonella caterpillar as a model host to study the role of the type III secretion system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis
    Sachiko Miyata
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 71:2404-13. 2003
    ..mellonella model and the results of cytopathology assays performed with a mammalian tissue culture system validated the use of G. mellonella for the study of the P. aeruginosa TTSS...
  26. ncbi request reprint Caenorhabditis elegans innate immune response triggered by Salmonella enterica requires intact LPS and is mediated by a MAPK signaling pathway
    Alejandro Aballay
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
    Curr Biol 13:47-52. 2003
    ..However, a presumptive C. elegans TOLL signaling pathway did not appear to be required for the PCD response to Salmonella. These results establish a PMK-1-dependant PCD pathway as a C. elegans innate immune response to Salmonella...
  27. pmc Hypersusceptibility of cystic fibrosis mice to chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa oropharyngeal colonization and lung infection
    Fadie T Coleman
    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1949-54. 2003
    ..aeruginosa colonization and infection and can be used for evaluations of lung pathophysiology, bacterial virulence, and development of therapies aimed at treating CF lung disease...
  28. pmc The G protein-coupled receptor FSHR-1 is required for the Caenorhabditis elegans innate immune response
    Jennifer R Powell
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:2782-7. 2009
    ..FSHR-1 may act generally to boost the nematode immune response, or it may function as a pathogen receptor...
  29. doi request reprint Comparing insertion libraries in two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to assess gene essentiality
    Nicole T Liberati
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 416:153-69. 2008
    ....
  30. pmc An ordered, nonredundant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 transposon insertion mutants
    Nicole T Liberati
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:2833-8. 2006
    ..Comparison of the genes disrupted in the PA14 transposon insertion library with an independently constructed insertion library in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 provides an estimate of the number of P. aeruginosa essential genes...
  31. pmc High-throughput screen for novel antimicrobials using a whole animal infection model
    Terence I Moy
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 4:527-33. 2009
    ..elegans animals but do not affect the growth of the pathogen in vitro, thus acting by a mechanism of action distinct from antibiotics currently in clinical use...
  32. doi request reprint Using PATIMDB to create bacterial transposon insertion mutant libraries
    Jonathan M Urbach
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Curr Protoc Mol Biol . 2009
    ..The protocols in this unit describe installation and use of PATIMDB software...
  33. ncbi request reprint Prospects for plant-derived antibacterials
    Kim Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 24:1504-7. 2006
    ..Can weakly active phytochemicals be combined synergistically to produce new antibacterial treatments?..
  34. pmc Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans
    Emily R Troemel
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Biol 6:2736-52. 2008
    ..elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes...
  35. pmc Tandemly duplicated Arabidopsis genes that encode polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins are regulated coordinately by different signal transduction pathways in response to fungal infection
    Simone Ferrari
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Plant Cell 15:93-106. 2003
    ..Therefore, gene duplication followed by the divergence of promoter regions may result in different modes of regulation of similar defensive proteins, thereby enhancing the likelihood of defense gene activation during pathogen infection...
  36. ncbi request reprint Pseudomonas biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance are linked to phenotypic variation
    Eliana Drenkard
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massahusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Nature 416:740-3. 2002
    ..Compounds that affect PvrR function could have an important role in the treatment of CF infections...
  37. pmc Requirement for a conserved Toll/interleukin-1 resistance domain protein in the Caenorhabditis elegans immune response
    Nicole T Liberati
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6593-8. 2004
    ..These data reveal the involvement of a previously uncharacterized, evolutionarily conserved TIR domain protein in innate immunity that is functionally distinct from other known TIR domain signaling adapters...
  38. pmc Challenge of Drosophila melanogaster with Cryptococcus neoformans and role of the innate immune response
    Yiorgos Apidianakis
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital Shriner s Burns Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 3:413-9. 2004
    ..However, the Toll pathway was necessary for the clearance of C. neoformans introduced directly into the hemolymph of D. melanogaster and for the survival of systemically infected flies...
  39. pmc Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 differ primarily by insertions or deletions, not single-nucleotide polymorphisms
    Indira T Kudva
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:1873-9. 2002
    ..coli K-12 (O islands), suggesting that strain-to-strain variation occurs in these O islands. These results may be utilized to devise novel strain-typing tools for this pathogen...
  40. pmc Glucosinolate metabolites required for an Arabidopsis innate immune response
    Nicole K Clay
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Science 323:95-101. 2009
    ..Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens...
  41. pmc DAF-16-dependent suppression of immunity during reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Sachiko Miyata
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Genetics 178:903-18. 2008
    ..The timing of DAF-16-dependent gene activation in sterile mutants coincides with the onset of embryonic development in wild-type animals, suggesting that signals from developing embryos normally downregulate the immune response...
  42. pmc Polymorphic amplified typing sequences provide a novel approach to Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain typing
    Indira T Kudva
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 40:1152-9. 2002
    ..These data suggest that typing by PATS may provide a simple procedure for strain typing of O157 and other bacteria and that further evaluation of the utility of this method for epidemiologic investigations is warranted...
  43. pmc Integration of Caenorhabditis elegans MAPK pathways mediating immunity and stress resistance by MEK-1 MAPK kinase and VHP-1 MAPK phosphatase
    Dennis H Kim
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:10990-4. 2004
    ..In addition, these data point to mechanisms in multicellular organisms by which signals transduced by distinct MAPK pathways may be subject to physiological integration at the level of regulation of MAPK activity by MAPKKs and MKPs...
  44. ncbi request reprint Prevention and control of pests and diseases
    Jenifer Bush
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 323:13-25. 2006
    ..Bacterial and viral infections of Arabidopsis, though they do occur, tend to be less common and can usually be controlled by maintaining optimal growth conditions and promptly disposing of dead or diseased plant material...
  45. ncbi request reprint MAP kinase signalling cascade in Arabidopsis innate immunity
    Tsuneaki Asai
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Nature 415:977-83. 2002
    ..Activation of this MAPK cascade confers resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens, suggesting that signalling events initiated by diverse pathogens converge into a conserved MAPK cascade...
  46. pmc Evolution of host innate defence: insights from Caenorhabditis elegans and primitive invertebrates
    Javier E Irazoqui
    Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Nat Rev Immunol 10:47-58. 2010
    ..What, therefore, do we know about host defence mechanisms in C. elegans and what can they tell us about innate immunity in higher organisms?..
  47. pmc Innate immune responses activated in Arabidopsis roots by microbe-associated molecular patterns
    Yves A Millet
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, U SA
    Plant Cell 22:973-90. 2010
    ..These experiments demonstrate the presence of highly orchestrated and tissue-specific MAMP responses in roots and potential pathogen-encoded mechanisms to block these MAMP-elicited signaling pathways...
  48. pmc Galleria mellonella as a model system to study Cryptococcus neoformans pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Gray Jackson 504, 55 Fruit St, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    Infect Immun 73:3842-50. 2005
    ..The G. mellonella-C. neoformans pathogenicity model may be a substitute for mammalian models of infection with C. neoformans and may facilitate the in vivo study of fungal virulence and efficacy of antifungal therapies...
  49. ncbi request reprint Cryptococcus neoformans Kin1 protein kinase homologue, identified through a Caenorhabditis elegans screen, promotes virulence in mammals
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mol Microbiol 54:407-19. 2004
    ..These findings show that the C. neoformans Kin1 kinase homologue is required for full virulence in disparate hosts and that C. elegans can be used as a substitute host to identify novel factors involved in fungal pathogenesis in mammals...
  50. pmc Signals involved in Arabidopsis resistance to Trichoplusia ni caterpillars induced by virulent and avirulent strains of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae
    Jianping Cui
    Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Plant Physiol 129:551-64. 2002
    ..ni resistance and overrides the SA-mediated increase in T. ni susceptibility, and a SA-independent systemic response induced by virulent pathogens that leads to enhanced susceptibility to T. ni...
  51. pmc Staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide protects against Caenorhabditis elegans immune defenses
    Jakob Begun
    Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 3:e57. 2007
    ....
  52. doi request reprint Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by medicinal plants in a Caenorhabditis elegans model system
    Allison Adonizio
    Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
    J Med Microbiol 57:809-13. 2008
    ..All extracts inhibited nematode death by P. aeruginosa without host toxicity, indicating their potential for further development as anti-infectives...
  53. pmc Contribution of gelatinase, serine protease, and fsr to the pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecalis endophthalmitis
    Michael Engelbert
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, USA
    Infect Immun 72:3628-33. 2004
    ..This increased attenuation suggests that there are possible additional pleiotropic effects of the defect in fsr on expression of traits contributing to the pathogenesis of enterococcal infection...
  54. ncbi request reprint Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions
    Jennifer L Tenor
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 USA
    Curr Biol 14:1018-24. 2004
    ....
  55. pmc Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Cryptococcus neoformans as a model of yeast pathogenesis
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:15675-80. 2002
    ..neoformans with environmental predators such as free-living nematodes and amoebae and suggest that C. elegans can be used as a simple model host in which C. neoformans pathogenesis can be readily studied...
  56. ncbi request reprint The worm has turned--microbial virulence modeled in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Costi D Sifri
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, University of Virginia Health System, MR4, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    Trends Microbiol 13:119-27. 2005
    ..C. elegans-based pathogenesis systems hold the potential to simultaneously explore the molecular genetic determinants of both pathogen virulence and host defense...
  57. doi request reprint Animal models for host-pathogen interactions
    Bruno Lemaitre
    Curr Opin Microbiol 11:249-50. 2008
  58. pmc A high-throughput, near-saturating screen for type III effector genes from Pseudomonas syringae
    Jeff H Chang
    Department of Biology CB 3280, Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:2549-54. 2005
    ..syringae pathovars and show that type III effector protein suites are highly variable in this pathogen, presumably reflecting the evolutionary selection imposed by the various host plants...
  59. pmc Pseudomonas syringae manipulates systemic plant defenses against pathogens and herbivores
    Jianping Cui
    Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:1791-6. 2005
    ..Rather, consistent with its role as a JA mimic, COR induces systemic resistance to T. ni. These data highlight the complexity of defense signaling interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores...
  60. pmc Construction of an Enterococcus faecalis Tn917-mediated-gene-disruption library offers insight into Tn917 insertion patterns
    Danielle A Garsin
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, JFB 1 711, Houston, TX 77030, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:7280-9. 2004
    ..2 Mb), the only E. faecalis strain whose sequence is in the public domain, over 10% of the Tn917 insertions appear to be in a OG1RF-specific sequence, suggesting that there are significant genomic differences among E. faecalis strains...
  61. ncbi request reprint Mediation of pathogen resistance by exudation of antimicrobials from roots
    Harsh P Bais
    Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, and Center for Rhizosphere Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 1173, USA
    Nature 434:217-21. 2005
    ..We also show that the ability of this P. syringae strain to block antimicrobial exudation is dependent on the type III secretory system...
  62. pmc Antifungal chemical compounds identified using a C. elegans pathogenicity assay
    Julia Breger
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 3:e18. 2007
    ..Compounds identified in the screen that affect the virulence of Candida in vivo can potentially be used as "probe compounds" and may have antifungal activity against other fungi...
  63. pmc Resistance to Botrytis cinerea induced in Arabidopsis by elicitors is independent of salicylic acid, ethylene, or jasmonate signaling but requires PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3
    Simone Ferrari
    Dipartimento Territorio e Sistemi Agro Forestali, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 23 35020 Legnaro, Italy
    Plant Physiol 144:367-79. 2007
    ....
  64. pmc Characterization of the integrated filamentous phage Pf5 and its involvement in small-colony formation
    Marlies J Mooij
    Department of Medical Microbiology and Infection Control, VU Medical Centre, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Microbiology 153:1790-8. 2007
    ..aeruginosa SCVs...
  65. pmc BifA, a cyclic-Di-GMP phosphodiesterase, inversely regulates biofilm formation and swarming motility by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14
    Sherry L Kuchma
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dartmouth Medical School, Rm 505, Vail Building, North College St, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:8165-78. 2007
    ..The DeltabifA mutation also results in decreased flagellar reversals. Based on epistasis studies with the previously described sadB gene, we propose that BifA functions upstream of SadB in the control of biofilm formation and swarming...
  66. pmc The Caenorhabditis elegans MAPK phosphatase VHP-1 mediates a novel JNK-like signaling pathway in stress response
    Tomoaki Mizuno
    Department of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Science, Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
    EMBO J 23:2226-34. 2004
    ..These results suggest that VHP-1 plays a pivotal role in the integration and fine-tuning of the stress response regulated by the KGB-1 MAPK pathway...
  67. pmc Exploiting amoeboid and non-vertebrate animal model systems to study the virulence of human pathogenic fungi
    Eleftherios Mylonakis
    PLoS Pathog 3:e101. 2007
    ..This review aims to assist researchers in identifying appropriate invertebrate systems for the study of particular aspects of fungal pathogenesis...

Research Grants24

  1. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..We will identify signaling pathways that lead to the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds. Finally, we will enter the data from this project into IMDS, a public, web-accessible relational database. ..
  2. Novel whole-animal screens for anti-microbials
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..2) Develop a high throughput C. elegans - S. enterica curing assay. 3) Develop a high throughput screen for identifying MDR pump inhibitors in the C. elegans curing assays. ..
  3. Studies of Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..elegans immune response and to delineate the relationship between longevity and pathogen resistance. ..
  4. Novel whole-animal screens for anti-microbials
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..2) Develop a high throughput C. elegans - S. enterica curing assay. 3) Develop a high throughput screen for identifying MDR prump inhibitors in the C. elegans curing assays. ..
  5. Studies of Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..elegans immune response and to delineate the relationship between longevity and pathogen resistance. ..
  6. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..elegans esp mutants. Finally, we propose to use genomic and reverse genetic approaches, including DNA microarray analysis, to identify C. elegans and Arabidopsis defense-related genes. ..
  7. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ....
  8. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSE
    FREDERICK AUSUBEL; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Finally, in Aim 5, we will clone and characterize selected Arabidopsis defense-related genes using a map-based positional cloning strategy. ..
  9. Identifying novel anti-infectives by high through-put screening in whole animals
    Frederick M Ausubel; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Rather than simply preventing bacteria from growing, these new sophisticated drugs will prevent disease by interfering with a microbe's ability to interact with the human body. ..