Peter E Turkeltaub

Summary

Affiliation: Georgetown University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Brain Stimulation and the Role of the Right Hemisphere in Aphasia Recovery
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Neurology Department, Georgetown University Medical Center, 4000 Reservoir Road, NW Building D, Suite 165, Washington, DC, 20057, USA
    Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 15:72. 2015
  2. pmc The right hemisphere is not unitary in its role in aphasia recovery
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Cortex 48:1179-86. 2012
  3. pmc Left lateralizing transcranial direct current stimulation improves reading efficiency
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Brain Stimul 5:201-7. 2012
  4. pmc Are networks for residual language function and recovery consistent across aphasic patients?
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3400 Spruce Street, 3W Gates Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Neurology 76:1726-34. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of hyperlexic reading: an FMRI case study
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Neuron 41:11-25. 2004
  6. pmc Parietal influence on temporal encoding indexed by simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography
    Martin Wiener
    Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Neurosci 32:12258-67. 2012
  7. pmc Localization of sublexical speech perception components
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 3 West Gates Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Brain Lang 114:1-15. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Alexia due to ischemic stroke of the visual word form area
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    a Department of Neurology, Georgetown University, 4000 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Neurocase 20:230-5. 2014
  9. ncbi request reprint Development of neural mechanisms for reading
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Georgetown University Medical Center, 4000 Reservoir Road, Building D Suite 150, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Nat Neurosci 6:767-73. 2003
  10. pmc Implicit timing activates the left inferior parietal cortex
    Martin Wiener
    Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6241, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:3967-71. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. doi request reprint Brain Stimulation and the Role of the Right Hemisphere in Aphasia Recovery
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Neurology Department, Georgetown University Medical Center, 4000 Reservoir Road, NW Building D, Suite 165, Washington, DC, 20057, USA
    Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 15:72. 2015
    ..Suggestions are provided for further investigation and for clinicians whose patients ask about brain stimulation treatments for aphasia. ..
  2. pmc The right hemisphere is not unitary in its role in aphasia recovery
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Cortex 48:1179-86. 2012
    ..No support is found for interhemispheric inhibition, the theoretical framework on which most therapeutic brain stimulation protocols for aphasia are based...
  3. pmc Left lateralizing transcranial direct current stimulation improves reading efficiency
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Brain Stimul 5:201-7. 2012
    ..Previous research has demonstrated a relationship between left posterior temporal cortex (pTC) function and reading ability, regardless of dyslexia status...
  4. pmc Are networks for residual language function and recovery consistent across aphasic patients?
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation, Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3400 Spruce Street, 3W Gates Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Neurology 76:1726-34. 2011
    ..To address this question, we performed a meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies of chronic aphasia after stroke...
  5. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of hyperlexic reading: an FMRI case study
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Neuron 41:11-25. 2004
    ..Hyperlexic reading is therefore associated with hyperactivation of the left superior temporal cortex, much in the same way as developmental dyslexia is associated with hypoactivation of this area...
  6. pmc Parietal influence on temporal encoding indexed by simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography
    Martin Wiener
    Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Neurosci 32:12258-67. 2012
    ..These results suggest that a feedforward mechanism from parietal to prefrontal regions mediates temporal encoding and demonstrate a dissociation between early and late phases of encoding processes...
  7. pmc Localization of sublexical speech perception components
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 3 West Gates Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Brain Lang 114:1-15. 2010
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Alexia due to ischemic stroke of the visual word form area
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    a Department of Neurology, Georgetown University, 4000 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Neurocase 20:230-5. 2014
    ..This case of acute-onset alexia in a previously normal individual due to a small stroke restricted to the VWFA and sparing occipital cortex and white matter pathways supports the conclusion that the VWFA is crucial for reading. ..
  9. ncbi request reprint Development of neural mechanisms for reading
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Georgetown University Medical Center, 4000 Reservoir Road, Building D Suite 150, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Nat Neurosci 6:767-73. 2003
    ..These findings inform current reading models and provide strong support for Orton's 1925 theory of reading development...
  10. pmc Implicit timing activates the left inferior parietal cortex
    Martin Wiener
    Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6241, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:3967-71. 2010
    ..Furthermore, in conjunction with a previously reported meta-analysis of explicit timing tasks, our data support the claim that implicit and explicit timing are supported by at least partially distinct neural structures...
  11. pmc Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex
    Rickson C Mesquita
    University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Biomed Opt 18:067006. 2013
    ..29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects...
  12. doi request reprint Development of ventral stream representations for single letters
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Center for the Study of Learning, Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1145:13-29. 2008
    ..Rather, our findings suggest that letter recognition is performed using the same general form recognition systems as are used to process other visually similar stimuli...
  13. doi request reprint A meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies of dyslexia
    Jose M Maisog
    Center for the Study of Learning, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1145:237-59. 2008
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Minimizing within-experiment and within-group effects in Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analyses
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 33:1-13. 2012
    ..Combining the two modifications minimizes both within-experiment and within-group effects, optimizing the degree to which ALE values represent concordance of findings across independent reports...
  15. pmc Examining the central and peripheral processes of written word production through meta-analysis
    Jeremy J Purcell
    Department of Pediatrics, Center for the Study of Learning, Georgetown University Washington, DC, USA
    Front Psychol 2:239. 2011
    ..These meta-analyses and the discussion of results provide a valuable foundation upon which future studies that examine the neural basis of written word production can build...
  16. ncbi request reprint Meta-analysis of the functional neuroanatomy of single-word reading: method and validation
    Peter E Turkeltaub
    Center for the Study of Learning, Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20007, USA
    Neuroimage 16:765-80. 2002
    ..Advantages of this automated meta-analysis technique include quantification of the level of concordance at all brain locations and the provision for use of a threshold for statistical significance of concordance...
  17. pmc Differences in the experience of active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation
    Sudha Kilaru Kessler
    Division of Neurology, Children s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Brain Stimul 5:155-62. 2012
    ..Few have directly evaluated whether sham and active stimulation are indistinguishable...