Brian G Richmond

Summary

Affiliation: George Washington University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Evidence that humans evolved from a knuckle-walking ancestor
    B G Richmond
    Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Nature 404:382-5. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint Early hominin limb proportions
    Brian G Richmond
    Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, 2110 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 43:529-48. 2002
  3. doi request reprint Orrorin tugenensis femoral morphology and the evolution of hominin bipedalism
    Brian G Richmond
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, 2110 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Science 319:1662-5. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Finite element analysis in functional morphology
    Brian G Richmond
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20052, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 283:259-74. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics of phalangeal curvature
    Brian G Richmond
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington D C 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:678-90. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Viewpoints: diet and dietary adaptations in early hominins: the hard food perspective
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 151:339-55. 2013
  7. doi request reprint A finite element analysis of masticatory stress hypotheses
    Janine Chalk
    Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 145:1-10. 2011
  8. doi request reprint The structural rigidity of the cranium of Australopithecus africanus: implications for diet, dietary adaptations, and the allometry of feeding biomechanics
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 293:583-93. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Masticatory biomechanics and its relevance to early hominid phylogeny: an examination of palatal thickness using finite-element analysis
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Ave, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:585-99. 2007
  10. pmc The feeding biomechanics and dietary ecology of Australopithecus africanus
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:2124-9. 2009

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint Evidence that humans evolved from a knuckle-walking ancestor
    B G Richmond
    Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Nature 404:382-5. 2000
    ..This removes key morphological evidence for a Pan-Gorilla clade, and suggests that bipedal hominids evolved from a knuckle-walking ancestor that was already partly terrestrial...
  2. ncbi request reprint Early hominin limb proportions
    Brian G Richmond
    Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, 2110 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 43:529-48. 2002
    ..The fact that the limb proportions of OH 62 (and possibly KNM-ER 3735) are no more human like than those of AL 288-1 underscores the primitive body design of H. habilis...
  3. doi request reprint Orrorin tugenensis femoral morphology and the evolution of hominin bipedalism
    Brian G Richmond
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, 2110 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Science 319:1662-5. 2008
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Finite element analysis in functional morphology
    Brian G Richmond
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20052, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 283:259-74. 2005
    ..We conclude with a case study to illustrate how researchers deal with many of the factors and assumptions involved in finite element analysis...
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics of phalangeal curvature
    Brian G Richmond
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington D C 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:678-90. 2007
    ..These results offer a biomechanical explanation for the observed association between phalangeal curvature and arboreality...
  6. doi request reprint Viewpoints: diet and dietary adaptations in early hominins: the hard food perspective
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 151:339-55. 2013
    ....
  7. doi request reprint A finite element analysis of masticatory stress hypotheses
    Janine Chalk
    Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 145:1-10. 2011
    ..Instead, we propose that FE models replace simple cranial models when interpreting bone strain data and formulating hypotheses about craniofacial biomechanics...
  8. doi request reprint The structural rigidity of the cranium of Australopithecus africanus: implications for diet, dietary adaptations, and the allometry of feeding biomechanics
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 293:583-93. 2010
    ..africanus cranium is marginally less rigid than that of the macaque during molar biting. It is hypothesized that the SE results are being influenced by the allometric scaling of cranial cortical bone thickness...
  9. ncbi request reprint Masticatory biomechanics and its relevance to early hominid phylogeny: an examination of palatal thickness using finite-element analysis
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Ave, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:585-99. 2007
    ..More functional studies of other facial features are needed, as are formal studies of morphological integration...
  10. pmc The feeding biomechanics and dietary ecology of Australopithecus africanus
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:2124-9. 2009
    ..Our analysis reconciles apparent discrepancies between dietary reconstructions based on biomechanics, tooth morphology, and dental microwear...
  11. ncbi request reprint Strong postcranial size dimorphism in Australopithecus afarensis: results from two new resampling methods for multivariate data sets with missing data
    Adam D Gordon
    Department of Anthropology, Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 135:311-28. 2008
    ..afarensis. However, the results of this and past studies strongly suggest behavioral and mating strategies differed between A. afarensis and modern humans...
  12. ncbi request reprint Microwear, mechanics and the feeding adaptations of Australopithecus africanus
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA
    J Hum Evol 62:165-8. 2012
    ..This paper responds to some of these mechanical criticisms, highlights limitations of dental microwear analysis, and identifies avenues of future research...
  13. doi request reprint Hominin stature, body mass, and walking speed estimates based on 1.5 million-year-old fossil footprints at Ileret, Kenya
    Heather L Dingwall
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 64:556-68. 2013
    ..6-185.8 cm), suggesting that these prints were most likely made by Homo erectus and/or male Paranthropus boisei. The large sizes of these footprints provide strong evidence that hominin body size increased during the early Pleistocene...
  14. doi request reprint The relationship between plantar pressure and footprint shape
    Kevin G Hatala
    Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, The George Washington University, 2110 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 65:21-8. 2013
    ..Further research is necessary to clarify how anatomical, functional, and sedimentary variables influence footprint formation and how each can be inferred from footprint morphology...
  15. ncbi request reprint Modeling elastic properties in finite-element analysis: how much precision is needed to produce an accurate model?
    David S Strait
    Department of Anthropology, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 283:275-87. 2005
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Joint orientation and function in great ape and human proximal pedal phalanges
    Nicole L Griffin
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 141:116-23. 2010
    ....
  17. doi request reprint Evolution and homologies of primate and modern human hand and forearm muscles, with notes on thumb movements and tool use
    Rui Diogo
    Department of Anatomy, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W St NW, Washington, DC 20059, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:64-78. 2012
    ..In relation to these structures, extant chimpanzees are more neotenic than modern humans...
  18. doi request reprint Hand pressure distribution during Oldowan stone tool production
    Erin Marie Williams
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 62:520-32. 2012
    ..Our findings call into question hypotheses linking modern human thumb robusticity specifically to load resistance during stone tool production...
  19. ncbi request reprint Limb-size proportions in Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanus
    David J Green
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:187-200. 2007
    ..africanus behavioral repertoire relative to that of A. afarensis...
  20. pmc Variation in foot strike patterns during running among habitually barefoot populations
    Kevin G Hatala
    Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA
    PLoS ONE 8:e52548. 2013
    ....
  21. doi request reprint Ecological divergence and medial cuneiform morphology in gorillas
    Matthew W Tocheri
    Human Origins Program, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, 10th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20013 7012, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:171-84. 2011
    ....
  22. pmc The effects of hypermuscularity on shoulder morphology in myostatin-deficient mice
    David J Green
    Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Anat 218:544-57. 2011
    ..As had been noted previously with long bones, this study demonstrates that genetically enhanced muscle size has marked effects on the morphological characteristics of the shoulder...
  23. doi request reprint Mouse shoulder morphology responds to locomotor activity and the kinematic differences of climbing and running
    David J Green
    Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois 60515, USA
    J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 318:621-38. 2012
    ..The results of this study demonstrate that variation in activity level and type of locomotor regime over a significant portion of the life history influences muscle and bone development in the shoulder...
  24. ncbi request reprint Cross-sectional geometry of the human forefoot
    Nicole L Griffin
    The George Washington University, Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, 2110 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Bone 37:253-60. 2005
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Modeling masticatory muscle force in finite element analysis: sensitivity analysis using principal coordinates analysis
    Callum F Ross
    Organismal Biology and Anatomy, University of Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 283:288-99. 2005
    ..However, a lot can be learned about patterns of skull deformation, in fossil species for example, by applying external forces proportional to the estimated relative PCSAs of the jaw adductors...
  26. ncbi request reprint New hand bones of Hadropithecus stenognathus: implications for the paleobiology of the Archaeolemuridae
    Pierre Lemelin
    Division of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T6G 2H7
    J Hum Evol 54:405-13. 2008
    ..These unusual hand features reinforce the monophyly of the Archaeolemuridae...