David J Green

Summary

Affiliation: George Washington University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Limb-size proportions in Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanus
    David J Green
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:187-200. 2007
  2. doi request reprint Metacarpal proportions in Australopithecus africanus
    David J Green
    Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University 2110 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 54:705-19. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint Strong postcranial size dimorphism in Australopithecus afarensis: results from two new resampling methods for multivariate data sets with missing data
    Adam D Gordon
    Department of Anthropology, Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 135:311-28. 2008
  4. pmc The effects of hypermuscularity on shoulder morphology in myostatin-deficient mice
    David J Green
    Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Anat 218:544-57. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Mouse shoulder morphology responds to locomotor activity and the kinematic differences of climbing and running
    David J Green
    Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois 60515, USA
    J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 318:621-38. 2012
  6. pmc The multiple signals assessed by female satin bowerbirds: could they be used to narrow down females' choices of mates?
    Timothy E Robson
    School of Integrative Biology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
    Biol Lett 1:264-7. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. ncbi request reprint Limb-size proportions in Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanus
    David J Green
    Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 52:187-200. 2007
    ..africanus behavioral repertoire relative to that of A. afarensis...
  2. doi request reprint Metacarpal proportions in Australopithecus africanus
    David J Green
    Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University 2110 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Hum Evol 54:705-19. 2008
    ..africanus did not place the same mechanical demands on the thumb as more recent, stone-tool-producing hominins...
  3. ncbi request reprint Strong postcranial size dimorphism in Australopithecus afarensis: results from two new resampling methods for multivariate data sets with missing data
    Adam D Gordon
    Department of Anthropology, Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 135:311-28. 2008
    ..afarensis. However, the results of this and past studies strongly suggest behavioral and mating strategies differed between A. afarensis and modern humans...
  4. pmc The effects of hypermuscularity on shoulder morphology in myostatin-deficient mice
    David J Green
    Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, 2110 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
    J Anat 218:544-57. 2011
    ..As had been noted previously with long bones, this study demonstrates that genetically enhanced muscle size has marked effects on the morphological characteristics of the shoulder...
  5. doi request reprint Mouse shoulder morphology responds to locomotor activity and the kinematic differences of climbing and running
    David J Green
    Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois 60515, USA
    J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 318:621-38. 2012
    ..The results of this study demonstrate that variation in activity level and type of locomotor regime over a significant portion of the life history influences muscle and bone development in the shoulder...
  6. pmc The multiple signals assessed by female satin bowerbirds: could they be used to narrow down females' choices of mates?
    Timothy E Robson
    School of Integrative Biology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
    Biol Lett 1:264-7. 2005
    ..After controlling for female visitation rates, it was found that a male's mating success was significantly related to his size and the rate at which he 'painted' his bower with saliva and chewed up plant material...