Katherine R Bonson

Summary

Affiliation: Food and Drug Administration
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Neural systems and cue-induced cocaine craving
    Katherine R Bonson
    Brain Imaging Center, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 26:376-86. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Increased occupancy of dopamine receptors in human striatum during cue-elicited cocaine craving
    Dean F Wong
    The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 0807, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:2716-27. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Cognitive modeling analysis of decision-making processes in cocaine abusers
    Julie C Stout
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 7007, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 11:742-7. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. ncbi request reprint Neural systems and cue-induced cocaine craving
    Katherine R Bonson
    Brain Imaging Center, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 26:376-86. 2002
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Increased occupancy of dopamine receptors in human striatum during cue-elicited cocaine craving
    Dean F Wong
    The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 0807, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:2716-27. 2006
    ..These results provide direct evidence that occupancy of dopamine receptors in human dorsal striatum increased in proportion to subjective craving, presumably because of increased release of intrasynaptic dopamine...
  3. ncbi request reprint Cognitive modeling analysis of decision-making processes in cocaine abusers
    Julie C Stout
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 7007, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 11:742-7. 2004
    ..The results of this analysis indicated, for the first time, that motivational and choice consistency factors, but not learning/memory were mainly responsible for the decision-making deficit of the cocaine abusers in this task...