Frank W Marlowe

Summary

Affiliation: Florida State University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Tubers as fallback foods and their impact on Hadza hunter-gatherers
    Frank W Marlowe
    Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:751-8. 2009
  2. pmc More 'altruistic' punishment in larger societies
    Frank W Marlowe
    Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:587-90. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Dynamics of postmarital residence among the Hadza: a kin investment model
    Brian M Wood
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Hum Nat 22:128-38. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint Facial averageness and attractiveness in an isolated population of hunter-gatherers
    Coren L Apicella
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Perception 36:1813-20. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint "Economic man" in cross-cultural perspective: behavioral experiments in 15 small-scale societies
    Joseph Henrich
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 28:795-815; discussion 815-55. 2005
  6. doi request reprint Household and kin provisioning by hadza men
    Brian M Wood
    Department of Anthropology, Yale University, 10 Sachem Street, New Haven, CT, 06511, USA
    Hum Nat 24:280-317. 2013
  7. pmc Testosterone and paternal care in East African foragers and pastoralists
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:347-54. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Anthropometric data indicate nutritional homogeneity in Hadza foragers of Tanzania
    Diana S Sherry
    Harvard University, Department of Anthropology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 19:107-18. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Is human ovulation concealed? Evidence from conception beliefs in a hunter-gatherer society
    Frank W Marlowe
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Arch Sex Behav 33:427-32. 2004
  10. pmc Preferences for symmetry in human faces in two cultures: data from the UK and the Hadza, an isolated group of hunter-gatherers
    Anthony C Little
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3113-7. 2007

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Tubers as fallback foods and their impact on Hadza hunter-gatherers
    Frank W Marlowe
    Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:751-8. 2009
    ..We discuss the implications of these results for the Hadza. We also discuss the importance of tubers in human evolution...
  2. pmc More 'altruistic' punishment in larger societies
    Frank W Marlowe
    Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:587-90. 2008
    ..Our results show that people in larger, more complex societies engage in significantly more third-party punishment than people in small-scale societies...
  3. doi request reprint Dynamics of postmarital residence among the Hadza: a kin investment model
    Brian M Wood
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Hum Nat 22:128-38. 2011
    ..This simple model may help explain some of the dynamics of postmarital residence among the Hadza and offer insight into the dynamics of multilocal residence, the most prevalent form of postmarital residence among foragers...
  4. ncbi request reprint Facial averageness and attractiveness in an isolated population of hunter-gatherers
    Coren L Apicella
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Perception 36:1813-20. 2007
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint "Economic man" in cross-cultural perspective: behavioral experiments in 15 small-scale societies
    Joseph Henrich
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 28:795-815; discussion 815-55. 2005
    ..Fifth, in many cases experimental play appears to reflect the common interactional patterns of everyday life...
  6. doi request reprint Household and kin provisioning by hadza men
    Brian M Wood
    Department of Anthropology, Yale University, 10 Sachem Street, New Haven, CT, 06511, USA
    Hum Nat 24:280-317. 2013
    ..In light of this, family provisioning is a more viable explanation for why good hunters are preferred as husbands and have higher fertility than others. ..
  7. pmc Testosterone and paternal care in East African foragers and pastoralists
    Martin N Muller
    Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:347-54. 2009
    ..Measurements in both populations confirmed these predictions, adding further support to the hypothesis that paternal care is associated with decreased testosterone production in men...
  8. ncbi request reprint Anthropometric data indicate nutritional homogeneity in Hadza foragers of Tanzania
    Diana S Sherry
    Harvard University, Department of Anthropology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 19:107-18. 2007
    ..Taken collectively, our results support the idea of broad nutritional homogeneity among the Hadza, but indicate that subtle, potentially important differences in energetic condition exist as well...
  9. ncbi request reprint Is human ovulation concealed? Evidence from conception beliefs in a hunter-gatherer society
    Frank W Marlowe
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Arch Sex Behav 33:427-32. 2004
    ..The Hadza know that pregnancy is caused by sex but most say conception occurs right after menstruation ends. Hadza conception beliefs therefore do not suggest that ovulation is more detectable in humans under more natural conditions...
  10. pmc Preferences for symmetry in human faces in two cultures: data from the UK and the Hadza, an isolated group of hunter-gatherers
    Anthony C Little
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3113-7. 2007
    ..These results imply that symmetry is an evolutionarily relevant trait and that variation in symmetry preference appears strategic both between cultures and within individuals of a single culture...