G M Erickson

Summary

Affiliation: Florida State University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Androgynous rex - the utility of chevrons for determining the sex of crocodilians and non-avian dinosaurs
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 1100 USA
    Zoology (Jena) 108:277-86. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Complex dental structure and wear biomechanics in hadrosaurid dinosaurs
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 4295, USA
    Science 338:98-101. 2012
  3. pmc Insights into the ecology and evolutionary success of crocodilians revealed through bite-force and tooth-pressure experimentation
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e31781. 2012
  4. pmc Was dinosaurian physiology inherited by birds? Reconciling slow growth in archaeopteryx
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e7390. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint A life table for Psittacosaurus lujiatunensis: initial insights into ornithischian dinosaur population biology
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 292:1514-21. 2009
  6. pmc Growth patterns in brooding dinosaurs reveals the timing of sexual maturity in non-avian dinosaurs and genesis of the avian condition
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 1100, USA
    Biol Lett 3:558-61. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Dinosaurian growth patterns and rapid avian growth rates
    G M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science and College of Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 1100, USA
    Nature 412:429-33. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Tyrannosaur life tables: an example of nonavian dinosaur population biology
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
    Science 313:213-7. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Gigantism and comparative life-history parameters of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 1100, USA
    Nature 430:772-5. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Evolution of the biomechanical material properties of the femur
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Integrative Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    Anat Rec 268:115-24. 2002

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. ncbi request reprint Androgynous rex - the utility of chevrons for determining the sex of crocodilians and non-avian dinosaurs
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 1100 USA
    Zoology (Jena) 108:277-86. 2005
    ..Study of well-preserved tyrannosaurid dinosaurs in museum collections showed nearly invariant chevron positioning like that seen in crocodilians. This suggests the usefulness of chevron anatomy for sexing dinosaurs is tenuous...
  2. doi request reprint Complex dental structure and wear biomechanics in hadrosaurid dinosaurs
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 4295, USA
    Science 338:98-101. 2012
    ..Three-dimensional wear models incorporating fossilized wear properties reveal how these tissues interacted for grinding and ecological specialization...
  3. pmc Insights into the ecology and evolutionary success of crocodilians revealed through bite-force and tooth-pressure experimentation
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e31781. 2012
    ..How these factors relate to biomechanical performance during feeding and their relevance to crocodilian evolutionary success are not known...
  4. pmc Was dinosaurian physiology inherited by birds? Reconciling slow growth in archaeopteryx
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e7390. 2009
    ..This hypothesis predicts that the long bones in these birds formed using rapidly growing, well-vascularized woven tissue typical of non-avialan dinosaurs...
  5. ncbi request reprint A life table for Psittacosaurus lujiatunensis: initial insights into ornithischian dinosaur population biology
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 292:1514-21. 2009
    ..This may reflect increased physiological demands and/or predation exposure associated with reproduction. Collectively these findings suggest that most nonavian dinosaurs may have had a similar life history strategy...
  6. pmc Growth patterns in brooding dinosaurs reveals the timing of sexual maturity in non-avian dinosaurs and genesis of the avian condition
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 1100, USA
    Biol Lett 3:558-61. 2007
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Dinosaurian growth patterns and rapid avian growth rates
    G M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science and College of Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 1100, USA
    Nature 412:429-33. 2001
    ..Non-avian dinosaurs did not attain rates like those of altricial birds. Avian growth rates were attained in a stepwise fashion after birds diverged from theropod ancestors in the Jurassic period...
  8. ncbi request reprint Tyrannosaur life tables: an example of nonavian dinosaur population biology
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
    Science 313:213-7. 2006
    ..Factors such as predation and entrance into the breeding population may have influenced tyrannosaur survivorship. This survivorship pattern can explain the rarity of juvenile specimens in museum collections...
  9. ncbi request reprint Gigantism and comparative life-history parameters of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 1100, USA
    Nature 430:772-5. 2004
    ..T. rex had a maximal growth rate of 2.1 kg d(-1), reached skeletal maturity in two decades and lived for up to 28 years. T. rex's great stature was primarily attained by accelerating growth rates beyond that of its closest relatives...
  10. ncbi request reprint Evolution of the biomechanical material properties of the femur
    Gregory M Erickson
    Department of Integrative Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
    Anat Rec 268:115-24. 2002
    ..Major locomotory challenges to femora during vertebrate evolution were almost solely accomplished by modifications of element size and shape...
  11. ncbi request reprint A basal tyrannosauroid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of China
    Xing Xu
    Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing 100044, China
    Nature 439:715-8. 2006
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint A basal dromaeosaurid and size evolution preceding avian flight
    Alan H Turner
    Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 5192, USA
    Science 317:1378-81. 2007
    ..Thus, change in theropod body size leading to flight's origin was not unidirectional...
  13. ncbi request reprint Definitive fossil evidence for the extant avian radiation in the Cretaceous
    Julia A Clarke
    Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 8208, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA
    Nature 433:305-8. 2005
    ..A minimum of five divergences within Aves before the K/T boundary are inferred from the placement of Vegavis; at least duck, chicken and ratite bird relatives were coextant with non-avian dinosaurs...
  14. pmc Prey choice and cannibalistic behaviour in the theropod Coelophysis
    Sterling J Nesbitt
    Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 5192, USA
    Biol Lett 2:611-4. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that this taxon is not cannibalistic and bring into question the commonality of this behaviour among non-avian dinosaurs...