Harold Franch

Summary

Affiliation: Emory University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Molecular signaling pathways regulating muscle proteolysis during atrophy
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Division, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 8:271-5. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Chaperone-mediated autophagy in the kidney: the road more traveled
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA and Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Electronic address
    Semin Nephrol 34:72-83. 2014
  3. ncbi request reprint Navigating between the Scylla and Charybdis of prescribing dietary protein for chronic kidney diseases
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA 30033, USA
    Annu Rev Nutr 29:341-64. 2009
  4. pmc Nutrition and muscle catabolism in maintenance hemodialysis: does feeding make muscle cells selective self-eaters?
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA
    J Ren Nutr 19:86-90. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Kidney growth during catabolic illness: what it does not destroy makes it grow stronger
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia
    J Ren Nutr 17:167-72. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Modification of the epidermal growth factor response by ammonia in renal cell hypertrophy
    H A Franch
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    J Am Soc Nephrol 11:1631-8. 2000
  7. ncbi request reprint Acidosis impairs insulin receptor substrate-1-associated phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in muscle cells: consequences on proteolysis
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Divisioin, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 287:F700-6. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Pathways of proteolysis affecting renal cell growth
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA and Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 11:445-50. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity is required for epidermal growth factor to suppress proteolysis
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, W M B, Room 338, 1639 Pierce Drive NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Am Soc Nephrol 13:903-9. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Akt and Mammalian target of rapamycin regulate separate systems of proteolysis in renal tubular cells
    Wen Shen
    Address correspondence to Dr Harold A Franch, Renal Division, Emory University School of Medicine, W M B, Room 338, 1639 Pierce Drive, N E, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Am Soc Nephrol 17:2414-23. 2006

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. ncbi request reprint Molecular signaling pathways regulating muscle proteolysis during atrophy
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Division, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 8:271-5. 2005
    ..This review will discuss recent findings on the molecular signaling pathways regulating proteolysis during muscle atrophy...
  2. doi request reprint Chaperone-mediated autophagy in the kidney: the road more traveled
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA and Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Electronic address
    Semin Nephrol 34:72-83. 2014
    ..Although there are more questions than answers about the role of high basal CMA activity, this remarkable feature of tubular protein metabolism appears to influence a variety of chronic diseases. ..
  3. ncbi request reprint Navigating between the Scylla and Charybdis of prescribing dietary protein for chronic kidney diseases
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA 30033, USA
    Annu Rev Nutr 29:341-64. 2009
    ..We have examined how dietary protein influences the mechanisms causing protein wasting, and we propose a framework for approaching the variable dietary protein requirements in patients with CKD or end-stage kidney disease...
  4. pmc Nutrition and muscle catabolism in maintenance hemodialysis: does feeding make muscle cells selective self-eaters?
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA
    J Ren Nutr 19:86-90. 2009
    ..Replacement of oxidized and other damaged proteins may be a benefit of protein feeding in hemodialysis, but alternative strategies, including exercise, will be required to build muscle...
  5. ncbi request reprint Kidney growth during catabolic illness: what it does not destroy makes it grow stronger
    Harold A Franch
    Research Service, Atlanta Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia
    J Ren Nutr 17:167-72. 2007
    ..Diabetes mellitus activates signaling through this pathway in the kidney while down-regulating it in skeletal muscle. We conclude that similar signaling pathways may regulate distinct proteolytic pathways in different tissues...
  6. ncbi request reprint Modification of the epidermal growth factor response by ammonia in renal cell hypertrophy
    H A Franch
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    J Am Soc Nephrol 11:1631-8. 2000
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Acidosis impairs insulin receptor substrate-1-associated phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in muscle cells: consequences on proteolysis
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Divisioin, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 287:F700-6. 2004
    ..We conclude that acidosis accelerates protein degradation by impairing insulin signaling through PI3K in muscle cells...
  8. ncbi request reprint Pathways of proteolysis affecting renal cell growth
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA and Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 11:445-50. 2002
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity is required for epidermal growth factor to suppress proteolysis
    Harold A Franch
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, W M B, Room 338, 1639 Pierce Drive NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Am Soc Nephrol 13:903-9. 2002
    ..It was concluded that EGF suppresses proteolysis by a mechanism that involves Ras and class 1 PI 3-kinase...
  10. ncbi request reprint Akt and Mammalian target of rapamycin regulate separate systems of proteolysis in renal tubular cells
    Wen Shen
    Address correspondence to Dr Harold A Franch, Renal Division, Emory University School of Medicine, W M B, Room 338, 1639 Pierce Drive, N E, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Am Soc Nephrol 17:2414-23. 2006
    ..Rapamycin has a novel effect of regulating proteasomal proteolysis in cells that are stimulated with EGF...
  11. ncbi request reprint Getting to the meat of the matter: beyond protein supplementation in maintenance dialysis
    James L Bailey
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    Semin Dial 22:512-8. 2009
    ..A supplementary exercise program would allow recovery of lean body mass. Given the multiple co-morbidities that exist in this population, therapy would have to be individualized...
  12. ncbi request reprint Suppression of chaperone-mediated autophagy in the renal cortex during acute diabetes mellitus
    Sira Sooparb
    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, and Atlanta Veterans Afffairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Kidney Int 65:2135-44. 2004
    ..Because the lysosomal proteolytic pathway of chaperone-mediated autophagy is suppressed by growth factors in cultured cells, we investigated whether the abundance of substrates of this pathway increase in diabetic hypertrophy...
  13. ncbi request reprint Prevention and treatment of protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease patients: a consensus statement by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism
    T Alp Ikizler
    Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
    Kidney Int 84:1096-107. 2013
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Family members of patients treated for ESRD have high rates of undetected kidney disease
    Claudine Jurkovitz
    Emory Center for Outcomes Research, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30306, USA
    Am J Kidney Dis 40:1173-8. 2002
    ..Several studies have reported that relatives of patients with ESRD are at risk for kidney disease (KD), but little is known about the prevalence and awareness of CKD in this population, which is the object of this report...

Research Grants5

  1. MECHANISMS OF PROTEIN ACCUMULATION IN RENAL HYPERTROPHY
    Harold Franch; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..It should also lay the ground work for further investigations into the mechanisms behind renal hypertrophy. ..
  2. Is Tissue ACE Required for Diabetic Renal Damage?
    Harold Franch; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..We believe that this approach will not only critically test our hypothesis, but will also lay the ground work for future studies into the role of ACE in the diabetic kidney. ..
  3. Mechanism of Protein Accumulation in Renal Hypertrophy
    Harold Franch; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This proposal studies how this same process may be important for destroying proteins damaged by diabetes that contribute to kidney disease. ..
  4. Mechanism of Protein Accumulation in Renal Hypertrophy
    Harold A Franch; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This proposal studies how this same process may be important for destroying proteins damaged by diabetes that contribute to kidney disease. ..