Anne M Burrows

Summary

Affiliation: Duquesne University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The facial expression musculature in primates and its evolutionary significance
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, PA and Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Bioessays 30:212-25. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Muscles of facial expression in Otolemur, with a comparison to lemuroidea
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 274:827-36. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Expression of neuron-specific markers by the vomeronasal neuroepithelium in six species of primates
    John C Dennis
    Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 281:1190-200. 2004
  4. doi request reprint Evolution of the muscles of facial expression in a monogamous ape: evaluating the relative influences of ecological and phylogenetic factors in hylobatids
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294:645-63. 2011
  5. pmc Facial musculature in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta): evolutionary and functional contexts with comparisons to chimpanzees and humans
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    J Anat 215:320-34. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Testing the validity of metacarpal use in sex assessment of human skeletal remains
    V Page Zanella
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA, USA
    J Forensic Sci 48:17-20. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Histomorphology of the mandibular condylar cartilage in greater galagos (Otolemur spp.)
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282, USA
    Am J Primatol 69:36-45. 2007
  8. pmc Muscles of facial expression in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes): descriptive, comparative and phylogenetic contexts
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    J Anat 208:153-67. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Blocking bone morphogenetic protein function using in vivo noggin therapy does not rescue premature suture fusion in rabbits with delayed-onset craniosynostosis
    James Cray
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15201, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:1163-72. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint Noggin inhibits postoperative resynostosis in craniosynostotic rabbits
    Gregory M Cooper
    Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 22:1046-54. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. doi request reprint The facial expression musculature in primates and its evolutionary significance
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, PA and Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Bioessays 30:212-25. 2008
    ..In addition, the unique structure, function and evolution of human mimetic musculature are discussed, along with the potential influential roles of human speech and eye gaze...
  2. ncbi request reprint Muscles of facial expression in Otolemur, with a comparison to lemuroidea
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 274:827-36. 2003
    ..These results underscore the need for a reexamination of facial musculature in prosimians in general, and may have taxonomic value as regards the position of Otolemur with lemuroids and other galagos...
  3. ncbi request reprint Expression of neuron-specific markers by the vomeronasal neuroepithelium in six species of primates
    John C Dennis
    Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 281:1190-200. 2004
    ..We establish that two strepsirrhine species and at least some New World haplorhines have mature sensory neurons in the VNO. In contrast, at all ages examined, Saguinus geoffroyi VNO expresses these markers in only a few cells...
  4. doi request reprint Evolution of the muscles of facial expression in a monogamous ape: evaluating the relative influences of ecological and phylogenetic factors in hylobatids
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294:645-63. 2011
    ....
  5. pmc Facial musculature in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta): evolutionary and functional contexts with comparisons to chimpanzees and humans
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    J Anat 215:320-34. 2009
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Testing the validity of metacarpal use in sex assessment of human skeletal remains
    V Page Zanella
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA, USA
    J Forensic Sci 48:17-20. 2003
    ..These results suggest that the use of metacarpals in sex determination may be limited and should be applied cautiously...
  7. ncbi request reprint Histomorphology of the mandibular condylar cartilage in greater galagos (Otolemur spp.)
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282, USA
    Am J Primatol 69:36-45. 2007
    ..These results suggest that O. crassicaudatus may be specialized to resist greater compressive force at the TMJ condylar cartilage in specific regions of the mandibular condyle...
  8. pmc Muscles of facial expression in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes): descriptive, comparative and phylogenetic contexts
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    J Anat 208:153-67. 2006
    ..These results amplify the importance of understanding facial musculature in primate taxa, which may hold great taxonomic value...
  9. doi request reprint Blocking bone morphogenetic protein function using in vivo noggin therapy does not rescue premature suture fusion in rabbits with delayed-onset craniosynostosis
    James Cray
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15201, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:1163-72. 2011
    ..The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that BMP inhibition using noggin therapy may rescue sutures destined to fuse by inhibiting initial ossification...
  10. ncbi request reprint Noggin inhibits postoperative resynostosis in craniosynostotic rabbits
    Gregory M Cooper
    Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 22:1046-54. 2007
    ..This study used a single dose of Noggin protein to prevent resynostosis and improve postoperative outcomes in a rabbit model of craniosynostosis...
  11. doi request reprint Microanatomical variation of the nasal capsular cartilage in newborn primates
    Timothy D Smith
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Pennsylvania, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 295:950-60. 2012
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Effects of flutamide therapy on craniofacial growth and development in a model of craniosynostosis
    James Cray
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Children s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15201, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 21:711-8. 2010
    ..Results suggest that androgen receptor-blocking using flutamide may only provide a transient rescue to suture fusion in this model. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of hormones on suture development and maintenance...
  13. doi request reprint Fate of the nasal capsular cartilages in prenatal and perinatal tamarins (Saguinus geoffroyi) and extent of secondary pneumatization of maxillary and frontal sinuses
    Timothy D Smith
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 16057, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 291:1397-413. 2008
    ..Since cartilage has the capacity to produce substances that trigger angiogenesis and bone resorption, further detailed characterization of the cartilage bordering sites of secondary pneumatization is merited...
  14. ncbi request reprint Scaling of the first ethmoturbinal in nocturnal strepsirrhines: olfactory and respiratory surfaces
    Timothy D Smith
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 16057, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 290:215-37. 2007
    ..g., maxilloturbinals) may scale close to isometry. In primates and perhaps other mammals, variation in ETI morphology may reflect dual adaptations for olfaction and endothermy...
  15. doi request reprint Microanatomical assessment of nasomaxillary suture patency
    Timothy D Smith
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA 16057, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 293:651-7. 2010
    ..These results indicate that microanatomical evidence is required to fully assess the extent of fusion of facial sutures. These findings also support previous observations of differing magnitude of suture fusion between the two species...
  16. ncbi request reprint Perinatal size and maturation of the olfactory and vomeronasal neuroepithelia in lorisoids and lemuroids
    Timothy D Smith
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 16057, USA
    Am J Primatol 69:74-85. 2007
    ..These results indicate that the VNNE may be relatively longer at birth in altricial species. However, it remains uncertain how phylogeny and/or ontogeny may explain these findings...
  17. ncbi request reprint The vomeronasal organ of greater bushbabies (Otolemur spp.): species, sex, and age differences
    Timothy D Smith
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA 16057, USA
    J Neurocytol 34:135-47. 2005
    ..Bushbabies or other strepsirrhine primates may offer an opportunity for further understanding of behavioral correlates of VNNE postnatal plasticity, which may represent primitive functional characteristics of the order Primates...
  18. doi request reprint Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced craniosynostosis and growth restriction in the immature skeleton
    Christopher R Kinsella
    Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:1173-81. 2011
    ..In the skeletally immature patient, the safety of rhBMP-2 therapy remains uncertain. Experiments are needed that investigate the effect of rhBMP-2 on growth and development in clinically relevant models...
  19. ncbi request reprint Three-dimensional analysis of mandibular morphology in Otolemur
    Anne M Burrows
    Department of Physical Therapy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 127:219-30. 2005
    ..garnettii. It is suggested that the results of the present study reflect adaptations for scraping in O. crassicaudatus rather than gouging...
  20. ncbi request reprint Comparative study of lectin reactivity in the vomeronasal organ of human and nonhuman primates
    Jonathan H Kinzinger
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 16057, USA
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 284:550-60. 2005
    ..The overall pattern of lectin reactivity in the human and chimpanzee VNO is unlike that seen in mammals with chemosensory VNOs, suggesting that the VNO of these hominoids does not function similarly to that of other primates...
  21. ncbi request reprint Postoperative anti-Tgf-beta2 antibody therapy improves intracranial volume and craniofacial growth in craniosynostotic rabbits
    Mark P Mooney
    Department of Oral Biology, Cleft Palate Craniofacial Center, University of Pittsburgh, and Children s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 18:336-46; discussion 347-9. 2007
    ..Thus, this biologically based therapy may be a potential surgical adjunct in the treatment of infants with craniosynostosis...
  22. doi request reprint Brief communication: histology and micro CT as methods for assessment of facial suture patency
    Lauren E Reinholt
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA 16057, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 138:499-506. 2009
    ..Thus, microanatomical evidence may be needed to fully assess biomechanical correlates and phylogenetic interpretations based on fusion of facial sutures. Our results also indicate micro CT may be a useful tool to obtain this evidence...
  23. ncbi request reprint Mandibular form in a rabbit model of familial nonsyndromic coronal suture synostosis
    Anne M Burrows
    School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 13:244-50. 2002
    ..The form difference noted is most likely secondary to the synostosed coronal suture and may reflect alterations in the cranial base or masticatory musculature in this rabbit model...
  24. doi request reprint Selection for universal facial emotion
    Bridget M Waller
    Centre for the Study of Emotion, Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, UK
    Emotion 8:435-9. 2008
    ..This explains how universal facial expression production is achieved, implies that facial muscles have been selected for essential nonverbal communicative function, and yet also accommodate individual variation...