JAMES AARON TULSKY

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Enhancing communication between oncologists and patients with a computer-based training program: a randomized trial
    James A Tulsky
    Duke University, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Ann Intern Med 155:593-601. 2011
  2. ncbi request reprint Beyond advance directives: importance of communication skills at the end of life
    James A Tulsky
    The Center for Palliative Care and the Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    JAMA 294:359-65. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Interventions to enhance communication among patients, providers, and families
    James A Tulsky
    Center for Palliative Care and the Department of Medicine, Duke University, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 8:S95-102. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Approaching difficult communication tasks in oncology
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
    CA Cancer J Clin 55:164-77. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Communication at times of transitions: how to help patients cope with loss and re-define hope
    Wendy G Evans
    Department of Medicine, Section of Medical Ethics and Palliative Care, Institute for Doctor Patient Communication, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    Cancer J 12:417-24. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions to palliative care
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine Oncology, University of Washington, 825 Eastlake Ave E, PO Box 19023, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Arch Intern Med 167:453-60. 2007
  7. pmc One-year trajectories of care and resource utilization for recipients of prolonged mechanical ventilation: a cohort study
    Mark Unroe
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Ann Intern Med 153:167-75. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Resident approaches to advance care planning on the day of hospital admission
    Alexander K Smith
    Division of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arch Intern Med 166:1597-602. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Provider-patient communication about antidepressants among veterans with mental health conditions
    Betsy Sleath
    Cecil G Sheps Center for Health Services Research and the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7590, USA
    Am J Geriatr Pharmacother 5:9-17. 2007
  10. pmc Do unmet expectations for specific tests, referrals, and new medications reduce patients' satisfaction?
    B Mitchell Peck
    College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Gen Intern Med 19:1080-7. 2004

Detail Information

Publications63

  1. pmc Enhancing communication between oncologists and patients with a computer-based training program: a randomized trial
    James A Tulsky
    Duke University, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Ann Intern Med 155:593-601. 2011
    ..Quality cancer care requires addressing patients' emotions, which oncologists infrequently do. Multiday courses can teach oncologists skills to handle emotion; however, such workshops are long and costly...
  2. ncbi request reprint Beyond advance directives: importance of communication skills at the end of life
    James A Tulsky
    The Center for Palliative Care and the Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    JAMA 294:359-65. 2005
    ..However, such planning should occur within a framework that emphasizes responding to patient and family emotions and focuses more on goals for care and less on specific treatments...
  3. ncbi request reprint Interventions to enhance communication among patients, providers, and families
    James A Tulsky
    Center for Palliative Care and the Department of Medicine, Duke University, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 8:S95-102. 2005
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Approaching difficult communication tasks in oncology
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
    CA Cancer J Clin 55:164-77. 2005
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Communication at times of transitions: how to help patients cope with loss and re-define hope
    Wendy G Evans
    Department of Medicine, Section of Medical Ethics and Palliative Care, Institute for Doctor Patient Communication, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    Cancer J 12:417-24. 2006
    ..This is accomplished with the Ask-Tell-Ask and Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst techniques, and most importantly by being curious about patients' hopes and fears...
  6. ncbi request reprint Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions to palliative care
    Anthony L Back
    Department of Medicine Oncology, University of Washington, 825 Eastlake Ave E, PO Box 19023, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Arch Intern Med 167:453-60. 2007
    ..This study evaluated the efficacy of Oncotalk in changing observable communication behaviors...
  7. pmc One-year trajectories of care and resource utilization for recipients of prolonged mechanical ventilation: a cohort study
    Mark Unroe
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Ann Intern Med 153:167-75. 2010
    ..Little is known about the patterns of care as patients transition from acute care hospitals to postacute care facilities or about the associated resource utilization...
  8. ncbi request reprint Resident approaches to advance care planning on the day of hospital admission
    Alexander K Smith
    Division of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arch Intern Med 166:1597-602. 2006
    ..Previous research has demonstrated a need to improve patient-physician communication around advance care planning. A critical time for advance care planning conversations is the day of admission to the hospital...
  9. ncbi request reprint Provider-patient communication about antidepressants among veterans with mental health conditions
    Betsy Sleath
    Cecil G Sheps Center for Health Services Research and the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7590, USA
    Am J Geriatr Pharmacother 5:9-17. 2007
    ..Little is known about provider-patient communication regarding antidepressants in primary care settings...
  10. pmc Do unmet expectations for specific tests, referrals, and new medications reduce patients' satisfaction?
    B Mitchell Peck
    College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Gen Intern Med 19:1080-7. 2004
    ..Patient-centered care requires clinicians to recognize and act on patients' expectations. However, relatively little is known about the specific expectations patients bring to the primary care visit...
  11. ncbi request reprint What length of hospice use maximizes reduction in medical expenditures near death in the US Medicare program?
    Donald H Taylor
    Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University Durham, Durham, NC, USA
    Soc Sci Med 65:1466-78. 2007
    ..Given the length of hospice use observed in the Medicare program, increasing the length of hospice use for 7 in 10 Medicare hospice users would increase savings...
  12. ncbi request reprint Racial differences in the growth of noncancer diagnoses among hospice enrollees
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 34:286-93. 2007
    ..Targeted efforts to increase hospice use among African Americans with noncancer diagnoses may be important in reducing racial disparities in overall hospice use and improving the quality of care for dying African Americans...
  13. pmc Do patient attributes predict oncologist empathic responses and patient perceptions of empathy?
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA
    Support Care Cancer 18:1405-11. 2010
    ..Oncologists may respond more empathically to some patients, and patients may perceive different levels of empathy and trust given past documentation of disparities in cancer care...
  14. ncbi request reprint Studying communication in oncologist-patient encounters: the SCOPE Trial
    Celine M Koropchak
    Department of Medicine and Center for Palliative Care, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Palliat Med 20:813-9. 2006
    ..In this report, we describe the study methods and identify challenges to implementation and how these were overcome...
  15. ncbi request reprint Identifying, recruiting, and retaining seriously-ill patients and their caregivers in longitudinal research
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center, Duke University, NC 27705, USA
    Palliat Med 20:745-54. 2006
    ..The palliative care literature is replete with descriptions of studies unable to meet enrollment goals, and that as a result, do not have adequate power to test hypotheses or draw conclusions...
  16. pmc Racial differences in self-reported exposure to information about hospice care
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Palliat Med 12:921-7. 2009
    ..Previous research suggests that lack of knowledge of hospice is a barrier to the use of hospice care by African Americans. However, there is little data examining racial differences in exposure to hospice information...
  17. ncbi request reprint Communication strategies and cultural issues in the delivery of bad news
    Joshua S Barclay
    Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 3860, USA
    J Palliat Med 10:958-77. 2007
    ..Through good communication practices, clinicians can help to avoid conflict and understand patients' desires for end of life care...
  18. pmc Fertility patients' views about frozen embryo disposition: results of a multi-institutional U.S. survey
    Anne Drapkin Lyerly
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Box 3040, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Fertil Steril 93:499-509. 2010
    ..To describe fertility patients' preferences for disposition of cryopreserved embryos and determine factors important to these preferences...
  19. pmc Negative emotions in cancer care: do oncologists' responses depend on severity and type of emotion?
    Sarah L Kennifer
    Center for Palliative Care, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, United States
    Patient Educ Couns 76:51-6. 2009
    ..To examine how type and severity of patients' negative emotions influence oncologists' responses and subsequent conversations...
  20. doi request reprint Do preparation and life completion discussions improve functioning and quality of life in seriously ill patients? Pilot randomized control trial
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 11:1234-40. 2008
    ..Significant palliative care intervention has focused on physical pain and symptom control; yet less empirical evidence supports efforts to address the psychosocial and spiritual dimensions of experience...
  21. pmc What explains racial differences in the use of advance directives and attitudes toward hospice care?
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 56:1953-8. 2008
    ..This study has implications for the design of healthcare delivery models and programs that provide culturally sensitive end-of-life care to a growing population of ethnically diverse older adults...
  22. pmc Primary care physicians' discussions of weight-related topics with overweight and obese adolescents: results from the Teen CHAT Pilot study
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Adolesc Health 45:205-7. 2009
    ..When physicians used MI skills, patients increased exercise, lost weight, and reduced screen time. Physicians should use MI techniques to help adolescents change...
  23. doi request reprint Racial differences in hospice revocation to pursue aggressive care
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Arch Intern Med 168:218-24. 2008
    ..Because of a greater preference for life-sustaining therapies at the end of life, African American patients may be more likely than white patients to withdraw from hospice to seek life-prolonging therapies...
  24. doi request reprint Characterizing hospice discharge patterns in a nationally representative sample of the elderly, 1993-2000
    Donald H Taylor
    Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Am J Hosp Palliat Care 25:9-15. 2008
    ..After controlling for survival time, costs per day survived are similar for all groups. This study suggests several motivations for being discharged alive that are worthy of more research...
  25. pmc Patient-oncologist communication in advanced cancer: predictors of patient perception of prognosis
    Tracy M Robinson
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA
    Support Care Cancer 16:1049-57. 2008
    ..This study was designed to identify the communication factors that influence patient-oncologist concordance about chance of cure...
  26. ncbi request reprint Oncologist communication about emotion during visits with patients with advanced cancer
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Research Program, Durham, NC, USA
    J Clin Oncol 25:5748-52. 2007
    ..We studied whether oncologist traits were associated with empathic opportunities and empathic responses...
  27. pmc Expectations and outcomes of prolonged mechanical ventilation
    Christopher E Cox
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Crit Care Med 37:2888-94; quiz 2904. 2009
    ..Prolonged mechanical ventilation provision is increasing markedly despite poor patient outcomes. Misunderstanding prognosis in the prolonged mechanical ventilation decision-making process could provide an explanation for this phenomenon...
  28. ncbi request reprint A controlled trial of a short course to improve residents' communication with patients at the end of life
    Stewart C Alexander
    Durham VA Medical Center, North Carolina, USA
    Acad Med 81:1008-12. 2006
    ..The goal was to evaluate the effect of a short course to improve residents' communication skills delivering bad news and eliciting patients' preferences for end-of-life care...
  29. ncbi request reprint Racial differences in next-of-kin participation in an ongoing survey of satisfaction with end-of-life care: a study of a study
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Palliat Med 9:1076-85. 2006
    ..Given the growing diversity of the U.S. population, researchers in end-of-life care must use strategies aimed at recruiting racially and ethnically diverse samples...
  30. ncbi request reprint The influence of spiritual beliefs and practices on the treatment preferences of African Americans: a review of the literature
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC Box 3003, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 53:711-9. 2005
    ..Given the growing ethnic diversity of the United States, some understanding of the complexities of culture and spirituality is essential for healthcare providers...
  31. pmc Effect of palliative oxygen versus room air in relief of breathlessness in patients with refractory dyspnoea: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial
    Amy P Abernethy
    Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Lancet 376:784-93. 2010
    ..We assessed the effectiveness of oxygen compared with room air delivered by nasal cannula for relief of breathlessness in this population of patients...
  32. doi request reprint An integrative approach to advanced kidney disease in the elderly
    Jane O Schell
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705 3860, USA
    Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 17:368-77. 2010
    ..This comprehensive approach to patient care involves the integration of nephrology, geriatric, and palliative medicine practices...
  33. pmc How do non-physician clinicians respond to advanced cancer patients' negative expressions of emotions?
    Stewart C Alexander
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Support Care Cancer 19:155-9. 2011
    ....
  34. pmc Physician communication techniques and weight loss in adults: Project CHAT
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Prev Med 39:321-8. 2010
    ..Physicians are encouraged to counsel overweight and obese patients to lose weight...
  35. pmc Comparing oncologist, nurse, and physician assistant attitudes toward discussions of negative emotions with patients
    Perri A Morgan
    Duke University PA Program, Department of Community and Family Medicine, DUMC 104780, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Physician Assist Educ 21:13-7. 2010
    ..Nurses and physician assistants (PAs) may be able to help fill the need for empathic communication. Our study compares the attitudes of oncologists, nurses, and PAs toward communication with patients who demonstrate negative emotions...
  36. ncbi request reprint Evolution in measuring the quality of dying
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Program on the Medical Encounter and Palliative Care, Durham VA Medical Center and Division of General Internal Medicine, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 5:407-14. 2002
    ..The purpose of this paper is to evaluate quality-of-life instruments currently used to assess the experiences of dying patients, and to offer a design for a next generation instrument to measure quality at the end of life...
  37. pmc Do the five A's work when physicians counsel about weight loss?
    Stewart C Alexander
    Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Fam Med 43:179-84. 2011
    ..An effective and efficient tool for smoking cessation is the Five A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange). We studied the effectiveness of the Five A's in weight-loss counseling...
  38. ncbi request reprint Initial assessment of a new instrument to measure quality of life at the end of life
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Program on the Medical Encounter and Palliative Care, Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 5:829-41. 2002
    ..We conducted this study to pilot a new multidimensional instrument to assess the quality of life at the end of life...
  39. doi request reprint Seriously ill patients' discussions of preparation and life completion: an intervention to assist with transition at the end of life
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Palliat Support Care 7:393-404. 2009
    ..We developed an intervention based on life review and emotional disclosure literatures and conducted a pilot study to determine feasibility and acceptability. This article presents qualitative intervention responses...
  40. ncbi request reprint Behind closed doors: management of patient expectations in primary care practices
    Sheri A Keitz
    Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arch Intern Med 167:445-52. 2007
    ..Managed care restrictions on resource use may affect communication between patients and health care professionals...
  41. ncbi request reprint Factors that affect infertility patients' decisions about disposition of frozen embryos
    Anne Drapkin Lyerly
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Fertil Steril 85:1623-30. 2006
    ..To describe factors that affect infertility patients' decision making regarding their cryopreserved embryos...
  42. pmc Surviving critical illness: acute respiratory distress syndrome as experienced by patients and their caregivers
    Christopher E Cox
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Crit Care Med 37:2702-8. 2009
    ..However, the experiences of acute respiratory distress syndrome survivors have not been reported...
  43. ncbi request reprint Measuring quality of life at the end of life: validation of the QUAL-E
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Program on the Medical Encounter and Palliative Care, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Palliat Support Care 2:3-14. 2004
    ..To validate the QUAL-E, a new measure of quality of life at the end of life...
  44. ncbi request reprint Is there no place like home? Caregivers recall reasons for and experience upon transfer from home hospice to inpatient facilities
    Wendy G Evans
    Department of Medicine, Duke University, and Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 9:100-10. 2006
    ..To describe caregivers' reasons for transfer from home hospice to inpatient facilities, preferences for site of care and death, and their experiences during these transfers...
  45. ncbi request reprint "Are you at peace?": one item to probe spiritual concerns at the end of life
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Centers for Palliative Care, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, School of Nursing, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arch Intern Med 166:101-5. 2006
    ..A practical, evidence-based approach to discussing spiritual concerns in a scope suitable to a physician-patient relationship may improve the quality of the clinical encounter...
  46. ncbi request reprint Ethnic differences in the place of death of elderly hospice enrollees
    Kimberly S Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 53:2209-15. 2005
    ..37-1.53). Admission to hospice reduces but does not eliminate ethnic differences in place of death. Further research should examine the effect of individual and cultural preferences for place of death on decisions to enroll in hospice...
  47. doi request reprint Is a home-care network necessary to access the Medicare hospice benefit?
    Courtney Harold Van Houtven
    Center for Health Services Research and Development in Primary Care, VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 12:687-94. 2009
    ..To test whether the presence of an informal or formal care network in the home leads to different hospice utilization patterns near death. To examine how the informal care relationship affects hospice use patterns...
  48. ncbi request reprint Teaching communication skills to medical oncology fellows
    Anthony L Back
    Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, 1660 S Columbian Way, S 111, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
    J Clin Oncol 21:2433-6. 2003
  49. ncbi request reprint Beyond autonomy: diversifying end-of-life decision-making approaches to serve patients and families
    Gary S Winzelberg
    Division of Geriatric Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 53:1046-50. 2005
    ..The goal of these priorities is to promote understanding of patients' and families' decision-making preferences and goals and to minimize decision-making burdens on families...
  50. ncbi request reprint On saying goodbye: acknowledging the end of the patient-physician relationship with patients who are near death
    Anthony L Back
    University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 1023, USA
    Ann Intern Med 142:682-5. 2005
  51. ncbi request reprint Palliative care curriculum development: a model for a content and process-based approach
    Wayne A Ury
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA
    J Palliat Med 5:539-48. 2002
    ..Two hypothetical institutions are used to illustrate relevant issues. Methods that have been successfully used to develop residency curricula are discussed...
  52. ncbi request reprint Objectives for advance care planning
    Russ C Kolarik
    General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    J Palliat Med 5:697-704. 2002
    ..If we are to improve care at the end of life, future patient care, research, and education about ACP should proceed with specific objectives in mind...
  53. ncbi request reprint Discussing religious and spiritual issues at the end of life: a practical guide for physicians
    Bernard Lo
    JAMA 287:749-54. 2002
    ..By responding to patients' spiritual and religious concerns and needs, physicians may help them find comfort and closure near the end of life...
  54. ncbi request reprint Responding to requests regarding prayer and religious ceremonies by patients near the end of life and their families
    Bernard Lo
    Program in Medical Ethics, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Palliat Med 6:409-15. 2003
    ..Physicians can respond to requests and respect patients' spiritual needs in ways that may deepen the therapeutic doctor-patient relationship, without compromising their own religious and spiritual beliefs or professional roles...
  55. pmc Discordance between patient-predicted and model-predicted life expectancy among ambulatory patients with heart failure
    Larry A Allen
    Duke Clinical Research Institute and Division of Cardiology, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    JAMA 299:2533-42. 2008
    ..Patients with chronic heart failure have impaired long-term survival, but their own expectations regarding prognosis have not been well studied...
  56. ncbi request reprint Reflective teaching practices: an approach to teaching communication skills in a small-group setting
    Kelly Fryer-Edwards
    Department of Medical History and Ethics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Acad Med 81:638-44. 2006
    ..These reflective teaching practices, while developed for communication skills training, may be useful for teaching other challenging topics such as ethics and professionalism...
  57. ncbi request reprint Measuring the quality of dying in long-term care
    Jean C Munn
    College of Social Work, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 55:1371-9. 2007
    ....
  58. pmc "What concerns me is..." Expression of emotion by advanced cancer patients during outpatient visits
    Wendy G Anderson
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine and Palliative Care Program, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue, Suite C 126, Box 0903, San Francisco, CA, 94143 0903, USA
    Support Care Cancer 16:803-11. 2008
    ..Cancer patients have high levels of distress, yet oncologists often do not recognize patients' concerns. We sought to describe how patients with advanced cancer verbally express negative emotion to their oncologists...
  59. ncbi request reprint Manualized communication interventions to enhance palliative care research and training: rigorous, testable approaches
    Joseph S Weiner
    Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Department of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY 11040, USA
    J Palliat Med 9:371-81. 2006
    ..The advantages of manualized communication approaches; some concepts underlying manual construction; and challenges to extending manualized communication to the palliative care domain are discussed...
  60. pmc Dreaded conversations: moving beyond discomfort in patient-physician communication
    Sarah L Clever
    J Gen Intern Med 17:884-5. 2002
  61. ncbi request reprint Hope and hubris
    James A Tulsky
    J Palliat Med 5:339-41. 2002
  62. ncbi request reprint Advance care planning by proxy for residents of long-term care facilities who lack decision-making capacity
    Ladislav Volicer
    Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Dementia Study Unit, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 50:761-7. 2002
    ..Instead, local facilities are advised to develop their own policies and then evaluate their effect. The report contains specific recommendations for the advance proxy planning process...
  63. ncbi request reprint Recommendations for the ethical conduct of quality improvement
    Ellen Fox
    National Center for Ethics in Health Care, Veterans Health Administration, Washington D C, USA
    J Clin Ethics 16:61-71. 2005

Research Grants16

  1. Communication in Oncologist Patient Encounters: A Patient Intervention
    JAMES AARON TULSKY; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..If successful, we will have developed a tool that is easily accessible to cancer patients, will enhance their communication with their oncologists, and improve their quality of life. ..
  2. Communication in Oncologist Patient Encounters: A Patient Intervention
    James Tulsky; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..If successful, we will have developed a tool that is easily accessible to cancer patients, will enhance their communication with their oncologists, and improve their quality of life. ..
  3. Trajectories of Serious Illness: Patients and Caregivers
    James Tulsky; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  4. Enhancing Patient-Oncologist Communication
    James Tulsky; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  5. Self-Management Interventions in Life-Limiting Illness
    JAMES AARON TULSKY; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Through all of these approaches, we hope to learn when and how to intervene and to further develop the theory of self-management in life-limiting illness. ..