Cris A Slentz

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Inactivity, exercise training and detraining, and plasma lipoproteins. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiology, Duke Univ Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Appl Physiol 103:432-42. 2007
  2. pmc Effects of aerobic vs. resistance training on visceral and liver fat stores, liver enzymes, and insulin resistance by HOMA in overweight adults from STRRIDE AT/RT
    Cris A Slentz
    Div of Cardiology, Dept of Medicine, PO Box 3022, Duke Univ Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 301:E1033-9. 2011
  3. ncbi request reprint Modest exercise prevents the progressive disease associated with physical inactivity
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 35:18-23. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of the amount of exercise on body weight, body composition, and measures of central obesity: STRRIDE--a randomized controlled study
    Cris A Slentz
    Divisions of Cardiology, Geriatric Medicine, and General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke Center for Living, Center for Health Policy Research, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Arch Intern Med 164:31-9. 2004
  5. pmc Exercise, abdominal obesity, skeletal muscle, and metabolic risk: evidence for a dose response
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 17:S27-33. 2009
  6. pmc Effects of exercise training intensity on pancreatic beta-cell function
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 32:1807-11. 2009
  7. pmc The STEDMAN project: biophysical, biochemical and metabolic effects of a behavioral weight loss intervention during weight loss, maintenance, and regain
    Lillian F Lien
    Department of Medicine, Sarah W Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    OMICS 13:21-35. 2009
  8. pmc Impact of hormone replacement therapy on exercise training-induced improvements in insulin action in sedentary overweight adults
    Kim M Huffman
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Metabolism 57:888-95. 2008
  9. pmc Exercise training amount and intensity effects on metabolic syndrome (from Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention through Defined Exercise)
    Johanna L Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center and Duke Center for Living, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Cardiol 100:1759-66. 2007
  10. pmc Comparison of aerobic versus resistance exercise training effects on metabolic syndrome (from the Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention Through Defined Exercise - STRRIDE-AT/RT)
    Lori A Bateman
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Cardiol 108:838-44. 2011

Detail Information

Publications32

  1. ncbi request reprint Inactivity, exercise training and detraining, and plasma lipoproteins. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiology, Duke Univ Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Appl Physiol 103:432-42. 2007
    ..Moderate-intensity but not vigorous-intensity exercise resulted in sustained VLDL-triglyceride lowering. Thirty minutes per day of vigorous exercise, like jogging, has sustained beneficial effects on HDL metabolism...
  2. pmc Effects of aerobic vs. resistance training on visceral and liver fat stores, liver enzymes, and insulin resistance by HOMA in overweight adults from STRRIDE AT/RT
    Cris A Slentz
    Div of Cardiology, Dept of Medicine, PO Box 3022, Duke Univ Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 301:E1033-9. 2011
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Modest exercise prevents the progressive disease associated with physical inactivity
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 35:18-23. 2007
    ..There seems to be a critical minimal level of physical activity required to maintain metabolic health. A modest amount of exercise seems to prevent metabolic deterioration...
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of the amount of exercise on body weight, body composition, and measures of central obesity: STRRIDE--a randomized controlled study
    Cris A Slentz
    Divisions of Cardiology, Geriatric Medicine, and General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke Center for Living, Center for Health Policy Research, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Arch Intern Med 164:31-9. 2004
    ..Obesity is a major health problem due, in part, to physical inactivity. The amount of activity needed to prevent weight gain is unknown...
  5. pmc Exercise, abdominal obesity, skeletal muscle, and metabolic risk: evidence for a dose response
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 17:S27-33. 2009
    ..Finally, favorable modulation of mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle by exercise training may reduce a block for complete oxidation of fatty acids in muscle and thereby relieve a block to effective insulin signaling...
  6. pmc Effects of exercise training intensity on pancreatic beta-cell function
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 32:1807-11. 2009
    ..Insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction both are important contributors to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Exercise training improves insulin sensitivity, but its effects on beta-cell function are less well studied...
  7. pmc The STEDMAN project: biophysical, biochemical and metabolic effects of a behavioral weight loss intervention during weight loss, maintenance, and regain
    Lillian F Lien
    Department of Medicine, Sarah W Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    OMICS 13:21-35. 2009
    ..These findings provide evidence for sustained benefits of weight loss in obese humans and insights into mechanisms...
  8. pmc Impact of hormone replacement therapy on exercise training-induced improvements in insulin action in sedentary overweight adults
    Kim M Huffman
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Metabolism 57:888-95. 2008
    ..These findings have implications for the relative utility of ET for improving insulin action in middle-aged men and women, particularly in the setting of differences in HRT use...
  9. pmc Exercise training amount and intensity effects on metabolic syndrome (from Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention through Defined Exercise)
    Johanna L Johnson
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center and Duke Center for Living, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Cardiol 100:1759-66. 2007
    ..A higher amount of vigorous exercise had greater and more widespread benefits. Finally, there was an indication that moderate-intensity may be better than vigorous-intensity exercise for improving MS...
  10. pmc Comparison of aerobic versus resistance exercise training effects on metabolic syndrome (from the Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention Through Defined Exercise - STRRIDE-AT/RT)
    Lori A Bateman
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Cardiol 108:838-44. 2011
    ..When weighing the time commitment versus health benefit, the data suggest that AT alone was the most efficient mode of exercise for improving cardiometabolic health...
  11. ncbi request reprint Minimal versus umbilical waist circumference measures as indicators of cardiovascular disease risk
    Leslie H Willis
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, P O Box 102903, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 15:753-9. 2007
    ..We examined two WC locations to determine which was more highly correlated with CVD risk factors and metabolic syndrome (MS)...
  12. pmc A branched-chain amino acid-related metabolic signature that differentiates obese and lean humans and contributes to insulin resistance
    Christopher B Newgard
    Sarah W Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Cell Metab 9:311-26. 2009
    ..Our findings show that in the context of a dietary pattern that includes high fat consumption, BCAA contributes to development of obesity-associated insulin resistance...
  13. pmc Effects of aerobic and/or resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight or obese adults
    Leslie H Willis
    Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Appl Physiol 113:1831-7. 2012
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Inactivity, exercise, and visceral fat. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount
    Cris A Slentz
    Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Appl Physiol 99:1613-8. 2005
    ..Importantly, a modest increase over the CDC/ACSM exercise recommendations resulted in significant decreases in visceral, subcutaneous, and total abdominal fat without changes in caloric intake...
  15. ncbi request reprint Response of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein to exercise training in an at-risk population
    Kim M Huffman
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am Heart J 152:793-800. 2006
    ..Our objective was to determine if modulating fitness with exercise training imposes changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in a mixed-sex population at risk for cardiovascular disease...
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of exercise training amount and intensity on peak oxygen consumption in middle-age men and women at risk for cardiovascular disease
    Brian D Duscha
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3022, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Chest 128:2788-93. 2005
    ..Although increasing aerobic fitness by exercise training is advocated as part of a healthy lifestyle, studies examining the different effects of intensity and amount on peak consumption (V(O2)) remain sparse...
  17. pmc Exercise-induced changes in metabolic intermediates, hormones, and inflammatory markers associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity
    Kim M Huffman
    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 34:174-6. 2011
    ..To understand relationships between exercise training-mediated improvements in insulin sensitivity (S(I)) and changes in circulating concentrations of metabolic intermediates, hormones, and inflammatory mediators...
  18. pmc Aerobic and resistance training effects on energy intake: the STRRIDE-AT/RT study
    Connie W Bales
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 44:2033-9. 2012
    ..Our study characterizes food and energy intake responses to long-term aerobic training (AT) and resistance training (RT) during a controlled 8-month trial...
  19. pmc Exercise effects on lipids in persons with varying dietary patterns-does diet matter if they exercise? Responses in Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention through Defined Exercise I
    Kim M Huffman
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Am Heart J 164:117-24. 2012
    ..The purpose of the current study was to determine if, across a range of dietary patterns, there were variable lipoprotein responses to an aerobic exercise training intervention...
  20. pmc Relationships between adipose tissue and cytokine responses to a randomized controlled exercise training intervention
    Kim M Huffman
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Metabolism 57:577-83. 2008
    ..In contradiction to our hypothesis, despite significant alterations in body composition, exercise training produced limited cytokine responses...
  21. ncbi request reprint Effects of the amount and intensity of exercise on plasma lipoproteins
    William E Kraus
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    N Engl J Med 347:1483-92. 2002
    ..However, the amount of exercise training required for optimal benefit is unknown. In a prospective, randomized study, we investigated the effects of the amount and intensity of exercise on lipoproteins...
  22. pmc Relationships between circulating metabolic intermediates and insulin action in overweight to obese, inactive men and women
    Kim M Huffman
    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 32:1678-83. 2009
    ..To determine whether circulating metabolic intermediates are related to insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction in individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes...
  23. pmc Effects of an 8-month exercise training program on off-exercise physical activity
    Vikram V Rangan
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 43:1744-51. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in PAEE in response to aerobic training (AT), resistance training (RT), or combined aerobic and resistance training (AT/RT)...
  24. doi request reprint Exercise training, lipid regulation, and insulin action: a tangled web of cause and effect
    William E Kraus
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 17:S21-6. 2009
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Gender and racial differences in lipoprotein subclass distributions: the STRRIDE study
    Johanna L Johnson
    Divisions of Cardiology, Duke Center for Living, Duke University Medical Center, 1300 Morreene Road, DUMC Box 3022 Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Atherosclerosis 176:371-7. 2004
    ..Within this homogenous population, there were distinct differences between gender and racial groups. Blacks and women had less atherogenic profiles than whites and men, which was not evident from the standard lipid panel...
  26. doi request reprint Effects of exercise training amount on physical activity energy expenditure
    Robert P Hollowell
    Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 41:1640-4. 2009
    ....
  27. doi request reprint Metabolic deterioration of the sedentary control group in clinical trials
    Mahesh J Patel
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Duke Univ Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Appl Physiol 111:1211-7. 2011
    ..Improving the understanding of how these factors influence an individual's physical activity requirements will help advance the field and help move the field toward the development of more personalized physical activity recommendations...
  28. ncbi request reprint The effect of the PREMIER interventions on insulin sensitivity
    Jamy D Ard
    Duke Hypertension Center, Duke University Medical Center, and Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 27:340-7. 2004
    ..This ancillary study of PREMIER sought to determine the effects on insulin sensitivity of a comprehensive behavioral intervention for hypertension with and without the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern...
  29. pmc Relationships between exercise-induced reductions in thigh intermuscular adipose tissue, changes in lipoprotein particle size, and visceral adiposity
    Michael T Durheim
    Duke University Medical Center, 1300 Morreene Rd, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 295:E407-12. 2008
    ..Reducing IMAT through aerobic exercise may be functionally related to some improvements in atherogenic dyslipidemia in men...
  30. ncbi request reprint The Study of the Effects of Diet on Metabolism and Nutrition (STEDMAN) weight loss project: Rationale and design
    Andrea M Haqq
    Sarah W Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Contemp Clin Trials 26:616-25. 2005
    ..Results from this study will expand our knowledge of the biology of obesity and weight regulation and may lead to targeted strategies for its treatment and control...
  31. ncbi request reprint Effect of the volume and intensity of exercise training on insulin sensitivity
    Joseph A Houmard
    Department of Exercise and Sports Science, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA
    J Appl Physiol 96:101-6. 2004
    ..Total exercise duration should thus be considered when designing training programs with the intent of improving insulin action...
  32. ncbi request reprint Adiponectin is not altered with exercise training despite enhanced insulin action
    Matthew W Hulver
    Department of Physiology, East Carolina University, Greenville North Carolina 27858, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 283:E861-5. 2002
    ..These data suggest that adiponectin is not a contributory factor to the exercise-related improvements in insulin sensitivity...