Kathryn I Pollak

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Predictors of weight loss communication in primary care encounters
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Patient Educ Couns 85:e175-82. 2011
  2. pmc Use of email in a family practice setting: opportunities and challenges in patient- and physician-initiated communication
    Ayaz Virji
    6 Step Weight Loss Center, 13191 Starkey Rd, Suite A 3, Largo, FL 33773, USA
    BMC Med 4:18. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Oncologist communication about emotion during visits with patients with advanced cancer
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Research Program, Durham, NC, USA
    J Clin Oncol 25:5748-52. 2007
  4. pmc Effects of counseling techniques on patients' weight-related attitudes and behaviors in a primary care clinic
    Mary E Cox
    Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA
    Patient Educ Couns 85:363-8. 2011
  5. pmc Primary care physicians' discussions of weight-related topics with overweight and obese adolescents: results from the Teen CHAT Pilot study
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Adolesc Health 45:205-7. 2009
  6. pmc Do patient attributes predict oncologist empathic responses and patient perceptions of empathy?
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA
    Support Care Cancer 18:1405-11. 2010
  7. pmc Can physicians accurately predict which patients will lose weight, improve nutrition and increase physical activity?
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Fam Pract 29:553-60. 2012
  8. pmc Olfactory and gustatory sensory changes to tobacco smoke in pregnant smokers
    Pamela K Pletsch
    School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Res Nurs Health 31:31-41. 2008
  9. pmc Predictors of adverse events among pregnant smokers exposed in a nicotine replacement therapy trial
    Geeta K Swamy
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Am J Obstet Gynecol 201:354.e1-7. 2009
  10. pmc Nicotine replacement and behavioral therapy for smoking cessation in pregnancy
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Am J Prev Med 33:297-305. 2007

Detail Information

Publications58

  1. pmc Predictors of weight loss communication in primary care encounters
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Patient Educ Couns 85:e175-82. 2011
    ..We assessed patient, physician, relationship, and systems predictors of length of weight-loss discussions and whether physicians' used MI techniques...
  2. pmc Use of email in a family practice setting: opportunities and challenges in patient- and physician-initiated communication
    Ayaz Virji
    6 Step Weight Loss Center, 13191 Starkey Rd, Suite A 3, Largo, FL 33773, USA
    BMC Med 4:18. 2006
    ..Electronic mail (email) has the potential to improve communication between physicians and patients...
  3. ncbi request reprint Oncologist communication about emotion during visits with patients with advanced cancer
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Research Program, Durham, NC, USA
    J Clin Oncol 25:5748-52. 2007
    ..We studied whether oncologist traits were associated with empathic opportunities and empathic responses...
  4. pmc Effects of counseling techniques on patients' weight-related attitudes and behaviors in a primary care clinic
    Mary E Cox
    Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA
    Patient Educ Couns 85:363-8. 2011
    ..Examine primary care physicians' use of counseling techniques when treating overweight and obese patients and the association with mediators of behavior change as well as change in nutrition, exercise, and weight loss attempts...
  5. pmc Primary care physicians' discussions of weight-related topics with overweight and obese adolescents: results from the Teen CHAT Pilot study
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Adolesc Health 45:205-7. 2009
    ..When physicians used MI skills, patients increased exercise, lost weight, and reduced screen time. Physicians should use MI techniques to help adolescents change...
  6. pmc Do patient attributes predict oncologist empathic responses and patient perceptions of empathy?
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA
    Support Care Cancer 18:1405-11. 2010
    ..Oncologists may respond more empathically to some patients, and patients may perceive different levels of empathy and trust given past documentation of disparities in cancer care...
  7. pmc Can physicians accurately predict which patients will lose weight, improve nutrition and increase physical activity?
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Fam Pract 29:553-60. 2012
    ..The relationships between physician outcome expectations and patient motivation and confidence also are assessed...
  8. pmc Olfactory and gustatory sensory changes to tobacco smoke in pregnant smokers
    Pamela K Pletsch
    School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Res Nurs Health 31:31-41. 2008
    ..Olfactory aversions were associated with women smoking less. Aversions to tobacco smoke are common among pregnant smokers, are associated with women smoking less, and could help explain pregnant women's smoking patterns...
  9. pmc Predictors of adverse events among pregnant smokers exposed in a nicotine replacement therapy trial
    Geeta K Swamy
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Am J Obstet Gynecol 201:354.e1-7. 2009
    ....
  10. pmc Nicotine replacement and behavioral therapy for smoking cessation in pregnancy
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Am J Prev Med 33:297-305. 2007
    ..This study examines whether adding nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pregnant smokers increases rates of smoking cessation...
  11. pmc Adherence to nicotine replacement therapy among pregnant smokers
    Laura J Fish
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center and Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Research Program, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Suite 602, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nicotine Tob Res 11:514-8. 2009
    ....
  12. pmc Negative emotions in cancer care: do oncologists' responses depend on severity and type of emotion?
    Sarah L Kennifer
    Center for Palliative Care, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, United States
    Patient Educ Couns 76:51-6. 2009
    ..To examine how type and severity of patients' negative emotions influence oncologists' responses and subsequent conversations...
  13. pmc Enhancing communication between oncologists and patients with a computer-based training program: a randomized trial
    James A Tulsky
    Duke University, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Ann Intern Med 155:593-601. 2011
    ..Quality cancer care requires addressing patients' emotions, which oncologists infrequently do. Multiday courses can teach oncologists skills to handle emotion; however, such workshops are long and costly...
  14. pmc Physician empathy and listening: associations with patient satisfaction and autonomy
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    J Am Board Fam Med 24:665-72. 2011
    ..Motivational Interviewing (MI) is used to help patients change their behaviors. We sought to determine if physician use of specific MI techniques increases patient satisfaction with the physician and perceived autonomy...
  15. pmc Physician communication techniques and weight loss in adults: Project CHAT
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Prev Med 39:321-8. 2010
    ..Physicians are encouraged to counsel overweight and obese patients to lose weight...
  16. pmc Comparing oncologist, nurse, and physician assistant attitudes toward discussions of negative emotions with patients
    Perri A Morgan
    Duke University PA Program, Department of Community and Family Medicine, DUMC 104780, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Physician Assist Educ 21:13-7. 2010
    ..Nurses and physician assistants (PAs) may be able to help fill the need for empathic communication. Our study compares the attitudes of oncologists, nurses, and PAs toward communication with patients who demonstrate negative emotions...
  17. ncbi request reprint Studying communication in oncologist-patient encounters: the SCOPE Trial
    Celine M Koropchak
    Department of Medicine and Center for Palliative Care, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Palliat Med 20:813-9. 2006
    ..In this report, we describe the study methods and identify challenges to implementation and how these were overcome...
  18. ncbi request reprint Empathy goes a long way in weight loss discussions
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Fam Pract 56:1031-6. 2007
    ..This study explores how weight-related topics are discussed between physicians and their overweight and obese female patients...
  19. pmc Hypertension improvement project: randomized trial of quality improvement for physicians and lifestyle modification for patients
    Laura P Svetkey
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Hypertension 54:1226-33. 2009
    ..Differences between treatment groups did not persist at 18 months. Combined physician and patient interventions lowers blood pressure; future research should focus on enhancing effectiveness and sustainability of these interventions...
  20. pmc Do the five A's work when physicians counsel about weight loss?
    Stewart C Alexander
    Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Fam Med 43:179-84. 2011
    ..An effective and efficient tool for smoking cessation is the Five A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange). We studied the effectiveness of the Five A's in weight-loss counseling...
  21. pmc How do non-physician clinicians respond to advanced cancer patients' negative expressions of emotions?
    Stewart C Alexander
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Support Care Cancer 19:155-9. 2011
    ....
  22. pmc Patient-oncologist communication in advanced cancer: predictors of patient perception of prognosis
    Tracy M Robinson
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA
    Support Care Cancer 16:1049-57. 2008
    ..This study was designed to identify the communication factors that influence patient-oncologist concordance about chance of cure...
  23. pmc Physician characteristics as predictors of blood pressure control in patients enrolled in the hypertension improvement project (HIP)
    Leonor Corsino
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) 13:106-11. 2011
    ..Given the increasing time demands on physicians, future research should examine how physicians with a busy practice are able to successfully address BP in their patients...
  24. pmc Factors associated with patient-recalled smoking cessation advice in a low-income clinic
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Durham, North Carolina 27710 2949, USA
    J Natl Med Assoc 94:354-63. 2002
    ..Future studies should address the dynamics of patient-provider communication about smoking cessation, especially in populations that include ethnically diverse patients...
  25. ncbi request reprint Physicians' beliefs about discussing obesity: results from focus groups
    Stewart C Alexander
    Durham VA Medical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 3860, USA
    Am J Health Promot 21:498-500. 2007
    ..Physicians are expected to discuss weight loss with overweight and obese patients. Physicians' beliefs, outcome expectancies, and strategies for addressing weight with patients have not been examined...
  26. ncbi request reprint Interpretation of genetic risk feedback among African American smokers with low socioeconomic status
    Isaac M Lipkus
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27701, USA
    Health Psychol 23:178-88. 2004
    ..The authors suggest additional research is needed to develop more effective strategies for communicating genetic risk feedback to motivate smoking cessation...
  27. pmc Is pregnancy a teachable moment for smoking cessation among US Latino expectant fathers? A pilot study
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Suite 602, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Ethn Health 15:47-59. 2010
    ..A 'teachable moment' is theorized to increase motivation to change a behavior through increased risk perceptions, emotional responses, and changes in self-image...
  28. pmc Hypertension Improvement Project (HIP): study protocol and implementation challenges
    Rowena J Dolor
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Trials 10:13. 2009
    ..The chronic care model suggests that blood pressure control can be achieved by improving how patients and physicians address patient self-care...
  29. pmc Family physicians as team leaders: "time" to share the care
    Kimberly S H Yarnall
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Prev Chronic Dis 6:A59. 2009
    ..The creation of primary care teams that include members such as physician assistants, nurse practitioners, dietitians, health educators, and lay coaches is important to meeting patients' primary care needs...
  30. ncbi request reprint Couples' reports of support for smoking cessation predicting women's late pregnancy cessation
    Kathryn I Pollak
    SDuke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, 2424 Erwin Road, Room 6029, Hock Plaza I Suite 602, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Am J Health Promot 21:90-6. 2006
    ..Although social support has been linked to smoking cessation, no studies have examined whether social support predicts women's late pregnancy cessation. Further, few have included reports from both support recipients and providers...
  31. ncbi request reprint Understanding health behavior change among couples: an interdependence and communal coping approach
    Megan A Lewis
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Soc Sci Med 62:1369-80. 2006
    ..Implications for research related to couples and health behavior change are also highlighted...
  32. ncbi request reprint A randomized trial comparing the effects of self-help materials and proactive telephone counseling on teen smoking cessation
    Isaac M Lipkus
    Department of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27701, USA
    Health Psychol 23:397-406. 2004
    ..However, refinements in telephone-counseling approaches may be needed to achieve the success observed in adult populations...
  33. pmc Primary care residents' characteristics and motives for providing differential medical treatment of cervical cancer screening
    Elva M Arredondo
    Department of Psychology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0085, USA
    J Natl Med Assoc 95:576-84. 2003
    ..This report assesses potential mechanisms that explain why certain providers do not address cervical cancer screening...
  34. doi request reprint Accuracy and Congruence of Patient and Physician Weight-Related Discussions: From Project CHAT (Communicating Health: Analyzing Talk)
    Michael E Bodner
    The Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC the School of Human Kinetics, Trinity Western University, Langley, British Columbia, Canada the Durham VA Medical Center, Center for Health Services Research, Durham, NC the Departments of Medicine and Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC and Health Services and Systems Research, Duke NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore
    J Am Board Fam Med 27:70-7. 2014
    ..Rates of self-reported, weight-related counseling vary, perhaps because of self-report bias. We assessed the accuracy and congruence of weight-related discussions among patients and physicians during audio-recorded encounters...
  35. ncbi request reprint Influence of stereotyping in smoking cessation counseling by primary care residents
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 2949, USA
    Ethn Dis 12:578-85. 2002
    ..Future research on the role of stereotyping in medical settings is warranted...
  36. ncbi request reprint Weight and smoking cessation among low-income African Americans
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Hanes House DUMC 2949, Trent Drive, Durham, NC 27710 2949, USA
    Am J Prev Med 25:136-9. 2003
    ..Cultural differences in weight standards and the high prevalence of weight-related health conditions (e.g., hypertension and diabetes) may influence concerns about smoking cessation-related weight gain...
  37. pmc Is there time for management of patients with chronic diseases in primary care?
    Truls Østbye
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Ann Fam Med 3:209-14. 2005
    ..Despite the availability of national practice guidelines, many patients fail to receive recommended chronic disease care. Physician time constraints in primary care are likely one cause...
  38. ncbi request reprint Rated helpfulness and partner-reported smoking cessation support across the pregnancy-postpartum continuum
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Research Program, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Health Psychol 25:762-70. 2006
    ..Partners may provide negative support in response to women's smoking cues. Women who are struggling with cessation may not view negative support as negative...
  39. ncbi request reprint Challenges and solutions for recruiting pregnant smokers into a nicotine replacement therapy trial
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nicotine Tob Res 8:547-54. 2006
    ..This paper discusses specific obstacles for recruitment and solutions. Knowing the potential pitfalls to recruiting pregnant women into these trials can lead to better studies and thus improved outcomes...
  40. doi request reprint A pilot study testing SMS text delivered scheduled gradual reduction to pregnant smokers
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC
    Nicotine Tob Res 15:1773-6. 2013
    ..Most interventions to help pregnant smokers quit or reduce their smoking are not easily disseminable. Innovative and disseminable interventions are needed...
  41. ncbi request reprint Distress and motivation for smoking cessation among lung cancer patients' relatives who smoke
    Colleen M McBride
    Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC 2949, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Cancer Educ 18:150-6. 2003
    ..Heightened distress at the time of a loved one's lung cancer diagnosis may motivate relatives to quit smoking or could undermine cessation...
  42. pmc Smoking prevalence in early pregnancy: comparison of self-report and anonymous urine cotinine testing
    Geeta K Swamy
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 24:86-90. 2011
    ..The objective of this study was to compare prevalence of smoking at prenatal intake by self-report with anonymous biochemical validation...
  43. ncbi request reprint Women's reports of smoking cessation advice during reproductive health visits and subsequent smoking cessation
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Durham, NC 27710 2949, USA
    Am J Manag Care 8:837-44. 2002
    ..To examine associations of women's characteristics with reports of provider advice to quit smoking and smoking cessation 1 year after a reproductive health visit...
  44. ncbi request reprint Exploring the association between perceived risks of smoking and benefits to quitting: who does not see the link?
    Pauline Lyna
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC 27710 2949, USA
    Addict Behav 27:293-307. 2002
    ..In conclusion, these subgroup differences in the relationship between perceptions of risks and benefits could be important to consider to increase the relevance and motivational potency of smoking cessation interventions...
  45. ncbi request reprint Age-related vulnerabilities of older adults with colon adenomas: evidence from Project Prevent
    Elizabeth C Clipp
    School of Nursing, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Cancer 100:1085-94. 2004
    ..S. overall and the first leading cause among individuals age > or = 75 years. Because polyp risk increases with age, interventions to prevent recurrent polyps among older adults likely would reduce CRC morbidity and mortality...
  46. pmc Estimated time spent on preventive services by primary care physicians
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center
    BMC Health Serv Res 8:245. 2008
    ..Delivery of preventive health services in primary care is lacking. One of the main barriers is lack of time. We estimated the amount of time primary care physicians spend on important preventive health services...
  47. pmc Primary care: is there enough time for prevention?
    Kimberly S H Yarnall
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am J Public Health 93:635-41. 2003
    ..We sought to determine the amount of time required for a primary care physician to provide recommended preventive services to an average patient panel...
  48. pmc Applying motivational interviewing techniques to palliative care communication
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Palliat Med 14:587-92. 2011
    ..Some elements from MI can be used to improve the quality and efficacy of palliative care conversations...
  49. ncbi request reprint Reported cessation advice given to African Americans by health care providers in a community health clinic
    Kathryn I Pollak
    Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 2949, USA
    J Community Health 27:381-93. 2002
    ..Providers may need additional training and prompting to counsel young healthy smokers about the importance of cessation...
  50. ncbi request reprint The impact of health status on physicians' intentions to offer cancer screening to older women
    Mitchell T Heflin
    Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, 2511 Blue Zone Duke South, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 61:844-50. 2006
    ..Screening for breast and cervical cancer reduces disease-specific mortality, but high rates of comorbidity and disability among elderly persons may alter the risks and benefits of screening...
  51. ncbi request reprint Relations between self-generated positive and negative expected smoking outcomes and smoking behavior: an exploratory study among adolescents
    Cheryl B Anderson
    Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Children s Nutrition Reseach Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Psychol Addict Behav 16:196-204. 2002
    ..In sum, greater elaboration of smoking-related memory networks, as well as the specific content of those networks, appear to be associated with smoking behavior...
  52. pmc "What concerns me is..." Expression of emotion by advanced cancer patients during outpatient visits
    Wendy G Anderson
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine and Palliative Care Program, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue, Suite C 126, Box 0903, San Francisco, CA, 94143 0903, USA
    Support Care Cancer 16:803-11. 2008
    ..Cancer patients have high levels of distress, yet oncologists often do not recognize patients' concerns. We sought to describe how patients with advanced cancer verbally express negative emotion to their oncologists...
  53. ncbi request reprint Project PREVENT: a randomized trial to reduce multiple behavioral risk factors for colon cancer
    Karen M Emmons
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Community Based Research, 44 Binney Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:1453-9. 2005
    ..This report examines the outcome data for Project PREVENT, a two-site randomized control trial designed to reduce behavioral risk factors for colorectal cancer among individuals who have been diagnosed with adenomatous colon polyps...
  54. ncbi request reprint Gender differences in adolescent smoking: mediator and moderator effects of self-generated expected smoking outcomes
    Jennifer Irvin Vidrine
    Department of Health Disparities Research, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, P O Box 301439 Unit 1330, Houston, Texas 77230 1439, USA
    Am J Health Promot 20:383-7. 2006
    ..To examine relations among gender, self-generated smoking-outcome expectancies, and smoking in adolescents...
  55. ncbi request reprint Race/ethnicity, smoking status, and self-generated expected outcomes from smoking among adolescents
    Jennifer Irvin Vidrine
    Department of Health Disparities Research, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77230 1439, USA
    Cancer Control 12:51-7. 2005
    ..Research is needed to examine more thoroughly racial/ethnic differences in expectancies...
  56. ncbi request reprint Prenatal and postpartum smoking abstinence a partner-assisted approach
    Colleen M McBride
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 8000, USA
    Am J Prev Med 27:232-8. 2004
    ..A partner's provision of support and smoking status has been consistently associated with women's likelihood of smoking cessation during pregnancy and relapse in postpartum...
  57. ncbi request reprint Prevalence and predictors of multiple behavioral risk factors for colon cancer
    Karen M Emmons
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Community Based Research, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Prev Med 40:527-34. 2005
    ..g., red meat consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, multivitamin intake, alcohol, smoking, and physical inactivity), co-occurrence among these behaviors, and motivation for change among patients at increased risk...
  58. pmc Understanding the role of cancer worry in creating a "teachable moment" for multiple risk factor reduction
    Colleen M McBride
    National Human Genome Research Institute, Social and Behavioral Research Branch, 2 Center Drive, Building 2, Room E408, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Soc Sci Med 66:790-800. 2008
    ....