David S Pisetsky

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The role of innate immunity in the induction of autoimmunity
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 8:69-72. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint The relationship between apoptosis and high-mobility group protein 1 release from murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, and Medical Research Services, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 178:6495-503. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Effects of cartilage impact with and without fracture on chondrocyte viability and the release of inflammatory markers
    Josef A Stolberg-Stolberg
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3389, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Orthop Res 31:1283-92. 2013
  4. pmc The induction of HMGB1 release from RAW 264.7 cells by transfected DNA
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Mol Immunol 45:2038-44. 2008
  5. doi request reprint The release of microparticles by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells stimulated with TLR ligands
    Julie Gauley
    Duke University Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 87:1115-23. 2010
  6. ncbi request reprint The release of DNA into the plasma of mice following hepatic cell death by apoptosis and necrosis
    Trinh T Tran
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Biomarkers 13:184-200. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Microparticles as autoadjuvants in the pathogenesis of SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Rev Rheumatol 6:368-72. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of Disease: the role of high-mobility group protein 1 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis
    Weiwen Jiang
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 3:52-8. 2007
  9. pmc Microparticles as a source of extracellular DNA
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VAMC, 151G, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Res 49:227-34. 2011
  10. pmc The role of macrophages in the in vitro generation of extracellular DNA from apoptotic and necrotic cells
    Jin Jung Choi
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunology 115:55-62. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications51

  1. doi request reprint The role of innate immunity in the induction of autoimmunity
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 8:69-72. 2008
    ..Together, these observations suggest that DNA can induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses and promote the pathogenesis of SLE because of its intrinsic immunostimulatory activity...
  2. ncbi request reprint The relationship between apoptosis and high-mobility group protein 1 release from murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, and Medical Research Services, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 178:6495-503. 2007
    ..Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 release from macrophages is correlated with the occurrence of apoptosis and suggest that these processes reflect common mechanisms and can occur concomitantly...
  3. doi request reprint Effects of cartilage impact with and without fracture on chondrocyte viability and the release of inflammatory markers
    Josef A Stolberg-Stolberg
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3389, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Orthop Res 31:1283-92. 2013
    ..This study indicates that the mechanism of trauma determines the type of chondrocyte death and the potential for post-injury inflammation...
  4. pmc The induction of HMGB1 release from RAW 264.7 cells by transfected DNA
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Mol Immunol 45:2038-44. 2008
    ....
  5. doi request reprint The release of microparticles by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells stimulated with TLR ligands
    Julie Gauley
    Duke University Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 87:1115-23. 2010
    ..Together, these experiments demonstrate that TLR stimulation of macrophages can lead to MP release, and NO plays a key role in this response...
  6. ncbi request reprint The release of DNA into the plasma of mice following hepatic cell death by apoptosis and necrosis
    Trinh T Tran
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Biomarkers 13:184-200. 2008
    ..These results indicate that increased blood DNA is common in hepatotoxic injury and is a feature of both apoptotic and necrotic death...
  7. doi request reprint Microparticles as autoadjuvants in the pathogenesis of SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Rev Rheumatol 6:368-72. 2010
    ..We would therefore advance the idea that a model for SLE based on MP autoadjuvants can provide a new paradigm to elucidate the mechanisms by which DNA and RNA affect the immune system and critically influence B-cell fate...
  8. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of Disease: the role of high-mobility group protein 1 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis
    Weiwen Jiang
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 3:52-8. 2007
    ..These studies identify a novel pathway in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, as well as a new target for biologic therapy...
  9. pmc Microparticles as a source of extracellular DNA
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VAMC, 151G, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Res 49:227-34. 2011
    ..This DNA is antigenically active and can bind to lupus anti-DNA autoantibodies. These findings suggest that microparticles are an important source of extracellular DNA to serve as an autoantigen and autoadjuvant in SLE...
  10. pmc The role of macrophages in the in vitro generation of extracellular DNA from apoptotic and necrotic cells
    Jin Jung Choi
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunology 115:55-62. 2005
    ..Together, these results indicate that macrophages play an important role in the generation of extracellular DNA from dead and dying cells, with the effect dependent on how the cell died...
  11. pmc HMGB1 and microparticles as mediators of the immune response to cell death
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Antioxid Redox Signal 15:2209-19. 2011
    ..Furthermore, nitric oxide can induce the release of both. These observations suggest that the products of dead cells can serve as important mediators to drive immune responses and promote inflammation and autoreactivity...
  12. pmc Use of SYTO 13, a fluorescent dye binding nucleic acids, for the detection of microparticles in in vitro systems
    Anirudh J Ullal
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Cytometry A 77:294-301. 2010
    ..Together, these findings indicate that the nucleic acid content of MPs provides the basis for their detection in in vitro systems and suggests the utility of fluorescent dyes like SYTO 13 for more sensitive quantitative assays...
  13. pmc The release of microparticles by Jurkat leukemia T cells treated with staurosporine and related kinase inhibitors to induce apoptosis
    Anirudh J Ullal
    Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Apoptosis 15:586-96. 2010
    ..Together, these results indicate that STS and UCN-01 induce MPs that are phenotypically distinct and reflect specific patterns of kinase inhibition during apoptosis...
  14. ncbi request reprint The binding of sera of patients with SLE to bacterial and mammalian DNA
    Kimberly J Hamilton
    Department of Medicine, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 151G, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Clin Immunol 118:209-18. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that anti-DNA antibodies vary in specificity and are consistent with a role of both foreign and self-DNA in anti-DNA induction...
  15. ncbi request reprint Autoimmunity: the nuclear arsenal of autoimmunity
    David S Pisetsky
    1151G Durham VA Hospital, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Cell Biol 85:344-5. 2007
  16. pmc The role of microparticles in the generation of immune complexes in murine lupus
    Anirudh J Ullal
    Duke University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Clin Immunol 146:1-9. 2013
    ..Together, these studies indicate important differences in the serological features of the two strains as reflected by the capacity of antibodies to bind to MPs...
  17. pmc Microparticles as mediators and biomarkers of rheumatic disease
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Rheumatology (Oxford) 51:1737-46. 2012
    ..MPs thus represent novel subcellular structures that can impact on the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease and serve as biomarkers of underlying cellular disturbances...
  18. ncbi request reprint The role of IFN-alpha and nitric oxide in the release of HMGB1 by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or lipopolysaccharide
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 177:3337-43. 2006
    ..7 cells. Together, these experiments indicate that, although both LPS and poly(I:C) induce HMGB1 release from RAW 264.7 cells and murine macrophages, the response is differentially dependent on NO and IFN-alpha...
  19. ncbi request reprint Role of Toll-like receptors in HMGB1 release from macrophages
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1109:58-65. 2007
    ..Because the kinetics of HMGB1 release differs from that of a conventional cytokine, it provides a broader therapeutic window and may be an important new target of therapy for inflammatory, autoimmune, and infectious diseases...
  20. ncbi request reprint The origin of extracellular DNA during the clearance of dead and dying cells
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Autoimmunity 40:281-4. 2007
    ..Together, these results indicate that, while apoptosis and necrosis can lead to a blood DNA response, this process requires macrophages and may be hormonally mediated...
  21. ncbi request reprint DNA as a marker of cell death in systemic lupus erythematosus
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham, NC, USA
    Rheum Dis Clin North Am 30:575-87, x. 2004
    ..These results indicate that circulating DNA may be a marker of cell death, although its levels likely reflect a complex process involving the interactions of macrophages with dead and dying cells...
  22. ncbi request reprint The immune response to cell death in SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, 151G Durham VA Hospital, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 3:500-4. 2004
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint The extracellular release of HMGB1 during apoptotic cell death
    Charles W Bell
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, and Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Affairs Hospital, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 291:C1318-25. 2006
    ..Together, these studies indicate that HMGB1 release can occur during the course of apoptosis as well as necrosis and suggest that the release process may vary with cell type...
  24. ncbi request reprint The effects of CpG DNA on HMGB1 release by murine macrophage cell lines
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 78:930-6. 2005
    ....
  25. pmc Effects of progesterone and estradiol sex hormones on the release of microparticles by RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated by Poly(I:C)
    David S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, 151G Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Clin Vaccine Immunol 18:1420-6. 2011
    ..Together, these results indicate that progesterone but not estradiol can inhibit particle release by stimulated macrophages and suggest a mechanism that may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of this sex hormone...
  26. doi request reprint Microparticles as antigenic targets of antibodies to DNA and nucleosomes in systemic lupus erythematosus
    Anirudh J Ullal
    Duke University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Autoimmun 36:173-80. 2011
    ..Together, these findings indicate that microparticles display DNA and nucleosomal molecules in an antigenic form and could represent a source of immune complexes in SLE...
  27. ncbi request reprint Systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases
    Trinh T Tran
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27709, USA
    Autoimmunity 37:301-4. 2004
  28. doi request reprint The content of DNA and RNA in microparticles released by Jurkat and HL-60 cells undergoing in vitro apoptosis
    Charles F Reich
    Medical Research Service, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Exp Cell Res 315:760-8. 2009
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint In vitro assay of immunostimulatory activities of plasmid vectors
    Weiwen Jiang
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 127:55-70. 2006
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Early rheumatoid arthritis
    Kate L Mitchell
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Curr Opin Rheumatol 19:278-83. 2007
    ..The purpose of current research is therefore to identify prognostic markers of early disease and to determine the role of aggressive treatment strategies in inducing remission in such patients...
  31. ncbi request reprint The effect of inflammation on the generation of plasma DNA from dead and dying cells in the peritoneum
    Ning Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 151G, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 77:296-302. 2005
    ....
  32. doi request reprint Predictors of preterm birth in patients with mild systemic lupus erythematosus
    Megan E B Clowse
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Ann Rheum Dis 72:1536-9. 2013
    ..Biomarkers that would identify at-risk pregnancies could allow interventions to prevent preterm birth...
  33. pmc Serum, urinary, and salivary nitric oxide in rheumatoid arthritis: complexities of interpreting nitric oxide measures
    J Brice Weinberg
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 8:R140. 2006
    ..Despite interest in the use of NO as a marker of disease activity, alterations in renal NOx clearance and fractional excretion in RA make it difficult to assess in vivo NO production even with strict dietary restriction of NOx intake...
  34. ncbi request reprint The role of nuclear macromolecules in innate immunity
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center and Duke University Medical Center, Box 151G, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Proc Am Thorac Soc 4:258-62. 2007
    ..For both DNA and HMGB1, the immune properties may therefore reflect the array of other endogenous as well as exogenous molecules present...
  35. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of activation of the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line by transfected mammalian DNA
    Weiwen Jiang
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Cell Immunol 229:31-40. 2004
    ..These data indicate that the immune activity of DNA is influenced by context or intracellular location and that, when transfected into cells, mammalian DNA can activate cells through signaling pathways similar to those of bacterial DNA...
  36. ncbi request reprint Induction of immune activation by a novel immunomodulatory oligonucleotide without thymocyte apoptosis
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 318:60-6. 2004
    ..The levels of corticosterone induced by HYB2048 were also significantly lower than those induced by LPS. This pattern of activation could distinguish CpG DNA from LPS in its effects on the immune system...
  37. ncbi request reprint The translocation of HMGB1 during cell activation and cell death
    Julie Gauley
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Autoimmunity 42:299-301. 2009
    ..Since agents that stimulate MPhi can also induce apoptosis, HMGB1 release following TLR stimulation may also reflect a contribution from dead cells, suggesting a common mechanism for protein release in activation and death...
  38. pmc Developments in the scientific understanding of lupus
    Stacy P Ardoin
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, 2301 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 10:218. 2008
    ..Together, these findings point to new genetic and immunologic markers of disease as well as targets for new therapies...
  39. ncbi request reprint Specificity and immunochemical properties of anti-DNA antibodies induced in normal mice by immunization with mammalian DNA with a CpG oligonucleotide as adjuvant
    Trinh T Tran
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27709, USA
    Clin Immunol 109:278-87. 2003
    ..Together, these results indicate that normal mice can produce autoantibodies to dsDNA, with a CpG ODN allowing the generation of antibodies resembling those in spontaneous autoimmunity...
  40. pmc The role of cell death in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease: HMGB1 and microparticles as intercellular mediators of inflammation
    Stacy P Ardoin
    Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Divisions of Rheumatology and Pediatric Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC Box 3212, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Mod Rheumatol 18:319-26. 2008
    ..Given their range of activity and association with active disease, both structures may prove to be targets for effective therapy in these and other disorders...
  41. pmc The effect of dexamethasone on the generation of plasma DNA from dead and dying cells
    Ning Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Pathol 164:1751-9. 2004
    ..These activities may be relevant to the efficacy of glucocorticoids in the treatment of inflammatory disease...
  42. pmc The origin and properties of extracellular DNA: from PAMP to DAMP
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Clin Immunol 144:32-40. 2012
    ..Together, these findings suggest that the immune properties of DNA are mutable and diverse, reflecting its context and the array of attached molecules...
  43. doi request reprint A landmark study on treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis
    David S Pisetsky
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 58:S123-5. 2008
  44. ncbi request reprint Clinician's comment on the management of pain in arthritis
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Health Psychol 26:657-9. 2007
    ..These factors include the following: diagnosis, disease activity, damage, disease stage, patient age and demographics, presence of comorbidities, and availability of alternative or adjunctive approaches...
  45. pmc High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1): an alarmin mediating the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 10:209. 2008
    ..New approaches to therapy for these diseases may involve strategies to inhibit HMGB1 release from cells, its interaction with receptors, and downstream signaling...
  46. pmc The blood nucleome in the pathogenesis of SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 10:35-7. 2010
    ..Together, these findings suggest that cell death is an important event in lupus pathogenesis and can provide a supply of blood DNA essential for immune complex formation...
  47. pmc The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers
    Nancy A Stearns
    Duke University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e40862. 2012
    ..Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment...
  48. ncbi request reprint The influence of oxygen tension on the induction of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 by mechanical stress in articular cartilage
    Beverley Fermor
    Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Box 3093, Duke University Medical Center, NC 27710, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 13:935-41. 2005
    ..The objective of this study was to determine the influence of oxygen tension on the induction of NO and PGE(2) production in articular cartilage in response to mechanical stress...
  49. ncbi request reprint B lymphocytes and systemic lupus erythematosus
    Lisa G Criscione
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, 151G Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Curr Rheumatol Rep 5:264-9. 2003
    ..New approaches to therapy aim to abrogate autoantibody production by targeting specific steps in B cell activation, including blockade of T cell costimulation...
  50. pmc Glomerular type 1 angiotensin receptors augment kidney injury and inflammation in murine autoimmune nephritis
    Steven D Crowley
    Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Duke University Medical Center, and Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Clin Invest 119:943-53. 2009
    ..Since AT1A-deficient lpr mice had low blood pressure, these findings suggest that activation of type 1 angiotensin receptors in the glomerulus is sufficient to accelerate renal injury and inflammation in the absence of hypertension...
  51. doi request reprint Rheumatology in the current era: the challenge of success
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology at the Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 4:165. 2008