D S Pisetsky

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc HMGB1: a smoking gun in lupus nephritis?
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, Box 151G, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 14:112. 2012
  2. pmc Serum, urinary, and salivary nitric oxide in rheumatoid arthritis: complexities of interpreting nitric oxide measures
    J Brice Weinberg
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 8:R140. 2006
  3. pmc Microparticles as biomarkers in autoimmunity: from dust bin to center stage
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 11:135. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?
    David S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Rev Rheumatol 7:551-6. 2011
  5. pmc Antinuclear antibodies in healthy people: the tip of autoimmunity's iceberg?
    David S Pisetsky
    Arthritis Res Ther 13:109. 2011
  6. pmc HMGB1 and microparticles as mediators of the immune response to cell death
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Antioxid Redox Signal 15:2209-19. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Antibodies to DNA: infection or genetics?
    D S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Lupus 18:1176-80. 2009
  8. pmc Microparticles as a source of extracellular DNA
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VAMC, 151G, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Res 49:227-34. 2011
  9. pmc High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1): an alarmin mediating the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 10:209. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint DNA as a marker of cell death in systemic lupus erythematosus
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham, NC, USA
    Rheum Dis Clin North Am 30:575-87, x. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications112 found, 100 shown here

  1. pmc HMGB1: a smoking gun in lupus nephritis?
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, Box 151G, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 14:112. 2012
    ..Defining more precisely the role of HMGB1 in lupus will require treatment studies to block the activity of this alarmin in animal models and ultimately patients...
  2. pmc Serum, urinary, and salivary nitric oxide in rheumatoid arthritis: complexities of interpreting nitric oxide measures
    J Brice Weinberg
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 8:R140. 2006
    ..Despite interest in the use of NO as a marker of disease activity, alterations in renal NOx clearance and fractional excretion in RA make it difficult to assess in vivo NO production even with strict dietary restriction of NOx intake...
  3. pmc Microparticles as biomarkers in autoimmunity: from dust bin to center stage
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 11:135. 2009
    ..These findings suggest microparticles as novel biomarkers for autoimmunity, with levels reflecting events leading to their loss as well as production...
  4. doi request reprint Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?
    David S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Rev Rheumatol 7:551-6. 2011
    ....
  5. pmc Antinuclear antibodies in healthy people: the tip of autoimmunity's iceberg?
    David S Pisetsky
    Arthritis Res Ther 13:109. 2011
    ..Future research will clarify the mechanisms of ANA expression and the utility of current assays as antecedent and screening biomarkers...
  6. pmc HMGB1 and microparticles as mediators of the immune response to cell death
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Antioxid Redox Signal 15:2209-19. 2011
    ..Furthermore, nitric oxide can induce the release of both. These observations suggest that the products of dead cells can serve as important mediators to drive immune responses and promote inflammation and autoreactivity...
  7. ncbi request reprint Antibodies to DNA: infection or genetics?
    D S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Lupus 18:1176-80. 2009
    ..Given the universal expression of DNA, this model suggests that many different kinds of infections could trigger pathogenic autoantibody responses in SLE, as well as induce flare...
  8. pmc Microparticles as a source of extracellular DNA
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VAMC, 151G, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Res 49:227-34. 2011
    ..This DNA is antigenically active and can bind to lupus anti-DNA autoantibodies. These findings suggest that microparticles are an important source of extracellular DNA to serve as an autoantigen and autoadjuvant in SLE...
  9. pmc High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1): an alarmin mediating the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 10:209. 2008
    ..New approaches to therapy for these diseases may involve strategies to inhibit HMGB1 release from cells, its interaction with receptors, and downstream signaling...
  10. ncbi request reprint DNA as a marker of cell death in systemic lupus erythematosus
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham, NC, USA
    Rheum Dis Clin North Am 30:575-87, x. 2004
    ..These results indicate that circulating DNA may be a marker of cell death, although its levels likely reflect a complex process involving the interactions of macrophages with dead and dying cells...
  11. ncbi request reprint The effect of dynamic mechanical compression on nitric oxide production in the meniscus
    C Fink
    Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 9:481-7. 2001
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Mechanical stress and nitric oxide influence leukotriene production in cartilage
    B Fermor
    Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 285:806-10. 2001
    ..These findings provide a direct link between mechanical stress and inflammation in cartilage and may have implications in the pathogenesis and treatment of arthritis...
  13. ncbi request reprint Interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-17 synergistically up-regulate nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production in explants of human osteoarthritic knee menisci
    A Legrand
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 44:2078-83. 2001
    ..NO and PGE2 exhibited reciprocal regulatory effects on one another, suggesting that pharmaceutical agents designed to inhibit NOS2 or COX-2 production may in fact be influencing both pathways...
  14. ncbi request reprint Differences in V kappa gene utilization and VH CDR3 sequence among anti-DNA from C3H-lpr mice and lupus mice with nephritis
    M K Wloch
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA
    Eur J Immunol 26:2225-33. 1996
    ..These results indicate that anti-DNA from C3H-lpr mice differ from anti-DNA from lupus mice with nephritis in patterns of V gene expression and suggest a molecular basis for the lack of pathogenicity of anti-DNA in these mice...
  15. ncbi request reprint The effects of static and intermittent compression on nitric oxide production in articular cartilage explants
    B Fermor
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Orthop Res 19:729-37. 2001
    ..These findings indicate that NO production by chondrocytes is influenced by mechanical compression in vitro and suggest that biomechanical factors may in part regulate NO production in vivo...
  16. pmc Role of the heat shock protein 90 in immune response stimulation by bacterial DNA and synthetic oligonucleotides
    F G Zhu
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Hospital, and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Infect Immun 69:5546-52. 2001
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of murine macrophage IL-12 production by natural and synthetic DNA
    D S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, 27705, USA
    Clin Immunol 96:198-204. 2000
    ..Together, these results indicate that DNA has inhibitory properties, suggesting that mammalian DNA could limit immune activation during inflammation and counteract the effects of bacterial DNA...
  18. ncbi request reprint The generation of extracellular DNA in SLE: the role of death and sex
    D S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham VA Hospital, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Scand J Immunol 64:200-4. 2006
    ..Together, these studies clarify the origin of extracellular DNA circulating in the blood in SLE and suggest steps in this process that can be interdicted by novel therapy...
  19. ncbi request reprint Influence of backbone chemistry on immune activation by synthetic oligonucleotides
    D S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Hospital, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Biochem Pharmacol 58:1981-8. 1999
    ..While suggesting differences in the structure-function relationships of nucleic acids in their immune activities, these findings also raise the possibility of the design of agents with specific patterns of immune modulation...
  20. ncbi request reprint Immune responses to DNA in normal and aberrant immunity
    D S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 22:119-26. 2000
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint The use of fluorometric assays to assess the immune response to DNA in murine systemic lupus erythematosus
    L Björkman
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Hospital and Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Scand J Immunol 57:525-33. 2003
    ..Together, our results suggest that a fluorometric dye can accurately monitor DNA and anti-DNA antibody levels in SLE and may provide important information on immunopathogenesis...
  22. ncbi request reprint The role of extracellular DNA in autoimmunity in SLE
    K Y Su
    Durham VA Medical Center and Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Scand J Immunol 70:175-83. 2009
    ..Together, these findings indicate that the generation of extracellular DNA in SLE can result from cell death and that steps in this process represent potential targets for new therapies...
  23. ncbi request reprint The role of cpg sequences in the induction of anti-DNA antibodies
    D S Pisetsky
    Durham VA and Duke University Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Clin Immunol 100:157-63. 2001
    ..These results thus extend the adjuvant effects of CpG sequences to self antigens and suggest mechanisms by which self and foreign antigens can interact in the generation of autoimmunity...
  24. ncbi request reprint The role of bacterial DNA in autoantibody induction
    D S Pisetsky
    VA Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 247:143-55. 2000
    ..Future studies will hopefully both determine the role of foreign nucleic acids in the induction of autoantibodies and lead to strategies for their elimination...
  25. ncbi request reprint Influence of hypoxia and reoxygenation on cytokine-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in articular cartilage
    Julie Cernanec
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 46:968-75. 2002
    ..The goal of this study was to determine the effects of hypoxia and reoxygenation on cytokine-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in articular cartilage...
  26. ncbi request reprint Molecular properties of anti-DNA induced in preautoimmune NZB/W mice by immunization with bacterial DNA
    M K Wloch
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Immunol 158:4500-6. 1997
    ..The findings suggest that preautoimmune NZB/W mice have immunoregulatory defects that allow activation of mammalian dsDNA reactive B cells by bacterial DNA...
  27. pmc The influence of DNA size on the binding of antibodies to DNA in the sera of normal human subjects and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
    D S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Clin Exp Immunol 116:354-9. 1999
    ..These results suggest that SLE and NHS anti-DNA react with different antigenic determinants on DNA, as shown by cross-reactivity as well as size dependency in solid-phase assays...
  28. pmc The role of macrophages in the in vitro generation of extracellular DNA from apoptotic and necrotic cells
    Jin Jung Choi
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunology 115:55-62. 2005
    ..Together, these results indicate that macrophages play an important role in the generation of extracellular DNA from dead and dying cells, with the effect dependent on how the cell died...
  29. ncbi request reprint Specificity and immunochemical properties of anti-DNA antibodies induced in normal mice by immunization with mammalian DNA with a CpG oligonucleotide as adjuvant
    Trinh T Tran
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27709, USA
    Clin Immunol 109:278-87. 2003
    ..Together, these results indicate that normal mice can produce autoantibodies to dsDNA, with a CpG ODN allowing the generation of antibodies resembling those in spontaneous autoimmunity...
  30. ncbi request reprint The influence of lipofectin on the in vitro stimulation of murine spleen cells by bacterial DNA and plasmid DNA vectors
    D S Pisetsky
    Medical Service, Durham VA Medical Center, NC 27705, USA
    J Interferon Cytokine Res 19:1219-26. 1999
    ..These findings indicate that lipofectin can increase the in vitro immunostimulatory effects of bacterial and plasmid DNA, although the magnitude of the increase may vary among responses...
  31. ncbi request reprint Release of DNA from dead and dying lymphocyte and monocyte cell lines in vitro
    J J Choi
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Scand J Immunol 60:159-66. 2004
    ..These studies suggest that extracellular release of DNA is a consequence of apoptosis and may account for some of the DNA in the blood...
  32. ncbi request reprint Anti-DNA and autoantibodies
    D S Pisetsky
    Division Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Durham VA and Duke University Medical Centers, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Curr Opin Rheumatol 12:364-8. 2000
    ..The clinical measurement of ANAs, although valuable in assessing diagnosis and prognosis, must nevertheless be interpreted with caution because ANAs, despite their disease associations, can occur in healthy individuals...
  33. ncbi request reprint Stimulation of thymocyte proliferation by phosphorothioate DNA oligonucleotides
    R B Mannon
    Division of Nephrology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, 27710, USA
    Cell Immunol 201:14-21. 2000
    ..These observations thus extend the range of actions of CpG DNA and suggest additional mechanisms for its function as an immunomodulatory agent or adjuvant...
  34. ncbi request reprint The role of microparticles in inflammation and thrombosis
    S P Ardoin
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, Durham, NC, USA
    Scand J Immunol 66:159-65. 2007
    ..As biomarkers, MP allow access to usually inaccessible tissues such as the endothelium. Further research will hopefully lead to interventions targeting MP release and function...
  35. ncbi request reprint Microparticles as autoadjuvants in the pathogenesis of SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Department of Medicine and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Rev Rheumatol 6:368-72. 2010
    ..We would therefore advance the idea that a model for SLE based on MP autoadjuvants can provide a new paradigm to elucidate the mechanisms by which DNA and RNA affect the immune system and critically influence B-cell fate...
  36. pmc The release of microparticles by Jurkat leukemia T cells treated with staurosporine and related kinase inhibitors to induce apoptosis
    Anirudh J Ullal
    Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Apoptosis 15:586-96. 2010
    ..Together, these results indicate that STS and UCN-01 induce MPs that are phenotypically distinct and reflect specific patterns of kinase inhibition during apoptosis...
  37. pmc The blood nucleome in the pathogenesis of SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 10:35-7. 2010
    ..Together, these findings suggest that cell death is an important event in lupus pathogenesis and can provide a supply of blood DNA essential for immune complex formation...
  38. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of Disease: the role of high-mobility group protein 1 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis
    Weiwen Jiang
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 3:52-8. 2007
    ..These studies identify a novel pathway in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, as well as a new target for biologic therapy...
  39. ncbi request reprint The origin of extracellular DNA during the clearance of dead and dying cells
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Autoimmunity 40:281-4. 2007
    ..Together, these results indicate that, while apoptosis and necrosis can lead to a blood DNA response, this process requires macrophages and may be hormonally mediated...
  40. ncbi request reprint The role of nuclear macromolecules in innate immunity
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center and Duke University Medical Center, Box 151G, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Proc Am Thorac Soc 4:258-62. 2007
    ..For both DNA and HMGB1, the immune properties may therefore reflect the array of other endogenous as well as exogenous molecules present...
  41. ncbi request reprint The content of DNA and RNA in microparticles released by Jurkat and HL-60 cells undergoing in vitro apoptosis
    Charles F Reich
    Medical Research Service, 151G Durham VAMC, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Exp Cell Res 315:760-8. 2009
    ....
  42. ncbi request reprint Role of Toll-like receptors in HMGB1 release from macrophages
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1109:58-65. 2007
    ..Because the kinetics of HMGB1 release differs from that of a conventional cytokine, it provides a broader therapeutic window and may be an important new target of therapy for inflammatory, autoimmune, and infectious diseases...
  43. ncbi request reprint Clinician's comment on the management of pain in arthritis
    David S Pisetsky
    Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Health Psychol 26:657-9. 2007
    ..These factors include the following: diagnosis, disease activity, damage, disease stage, patient age and demographics, presence of comorbidities, and availability of alternative or adjunctive approaches...
  44. doi request reprint A landmark study on treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis
    David S Pisetsky
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 58:S123-5. 2008
  45. pmc The role of cell death in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease: HMGB1 and microparticles as intercellular mediators of inflammation
    Stacy P Ardoin
    Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Divisions of Rheumatology and Pediatric Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC Box 3212, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Mod Rheumatol 18:319-26. 2008
    ..Given their range of activity and association with active disease, both structures may prove to be targets for effective therapy in these and other disorders...
  46. pmc Use of SYTO 13, a fluorescent dye binding nucleic acids, for the detection of microparticles in in vitro systems
    Anirudh J Ullal
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Cytometry A 77:294-301. 2010
    ..Together, these findings indicate that the nucleic acid content of MPs provides the basis for their detection in in vitro systems and suggests the utility of fluorescent dyes like SYTO 13 for more sensitive quantitative assays...
  47. ncbi request reprint A walk on the beach
    David S Pisetsky
    Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Ann Intern Med 137:366-7. 2002
  48. ncbi request reprint The role of innate immunity in the induction of autoimmunity
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 8:69-72. 2008
    ..Together, these observations suggest that DNA can induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses and promote the pathogenesis of SLE because of its intrinsic immunostimulatory activity...
  49. pmc Developments in the scientific understanding of lupus
    Stacy P Ardoin
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, 2301 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Arthritis Res Ther 10:218. 2008
    ..Together, these findings point to new genetic and immunologic markers of disease as well as targets for new therapies...
  50. ncbi request reprint Autoimmunity: the nuclear arsenal of autoimmunity
    David S Pisetsky
    1151G Durham VA Hospital, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Cell Biol 85:344-5. 2007
  51. pmc The effect of dexamethasone on the generation of plasma DNA from dead and dying cells
    Ning Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Pathol 164:1751-9. 2004
    ..These activities may be relevant to the efficacy of glucocorticoids in the treatment of inflammatory disease...
  52. ncbi request reprint OutOfDate
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc 67:17-8. 2004
  53. ncbi request reprint Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of human disease
    Donald N Cook
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, and the Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Nat Immunol 5:975-9. 2004
    ..As this body of data grows, it will provide new insights into disease pathogenesis as well as valuable information on the merits of various therapeutic options...
  54. ncbi request reprint The influence of oxygen tension on the induction of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 by mechanical stress in articular cartilage
    Beverley Fermor
    Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Box 3093, Duke University Medical Center, NC 27710, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 13:935-41. 2005
    ..The objective of this study was to determine the influence of oxygen tension on the induction of NO and PGE(2) production in articular cartilage in response to mechanical stress...
  55. ncbi request reprint The expression of plasma nucleosomes in mice undergoing in vivo apoptosis
    Ning Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27709, USA
    Clin Immunol 106:139-47. 2003
    ..These results suggest that plasma nucleosome levels reflect specific patterns of cell death and are not an invariable consequence of in vivo apoptosis or immune cell activation...
  56. ncbi request reprint The immune response to cell death in SLE
    David S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, 151G Durham VA Hospital, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Autoimmun Rev 3:500-4. 2004
    ....
  57. doi request reprint The role of microparticles in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus
    J R Dye
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Scand J Immunol 78:140-8. 2013
    ..Future studies will define the pathways by which particles promote pathogenesis, strategies to block their activity and their utility as biomarkers to assess disease activity and the response to therapy. ..
  58. pmc The role of the macrophage scavenger receptor in immune stimulation by bacterial DNA and synthetic oligonucleotides
    F G Zhu
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Hospital and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Immunology 103:226-34. 2001
    ..Together, these findings indicate that, while the SRA may bind DNA, this receptor is not essential for the uptake of CpG DNA or its immunostimulatory activity...
  59. pmc Host response to infection: the role of CpG DNA in induction of cyclooxygenase 2 and nitric oxide synthase 2 in murine macrophages
    D K Ghosh
    Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs and Duke University Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Infect Immun 69:7703-10. 2001
    ..Thus, analogues of microbial DNA (i.e., CpG DNA) activate mouse macrophage lineage cells for the expression of NOS2 and COX2, with the production of NO and that of PGE(2) occurring in an interdependent manner...
  60. ncbi request reprint The influence of base sequence on the immunostimulatory properties of DNA
    D S Pisetsky
    Medical Service Durham VA Medical Center and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, NC 27705, USA
    Immunol Res 19:35-46. 1999
    ..The array of these sequences may determine the overall immune activity of a DNA molecule and affect such processes as host defense against infection as well as the use of plasmids and synthetic oligonucleotides to treat disease...
  61. pmc The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of spontaneous murine autoimmune disease: increased nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase expression in MRL-lpr/lpr mice, and reduction of spontaneous glomerulonephritis and arthritis by orally admi
    J B Weinberg
    Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705
    J Exp Med 179:651-60. 1994
    ..These results suggest that elevated nitric oxide production could be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, and that treatments to block the production of nitric oxide or block its effects might be valuable therapeutically...
  62. ncbi request reprint The release of microparticles by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells stimulated with TLR ligands
    Julie Gauley
    Duke University Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 87:1115-23. 2010
    ..Together, these experiments demonstrate that TLR stimulation of macrophages can lead to MP release, and NO plays a key role in this response...
  63. pmc Effect of cytofectins on the immune response of murine macrophages to mammalian DNA
    Fu Gang Zhu
    Durham Veterans Administration Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Immunology 109:255-62. 2003
    ..Our findings indicate that macrophages vary in their response to DNA depending on uptake pathway, suggesting that activation by DNA reflects not only sequence but also context or intracellular location...
  64. ncbi request reprint Systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases
    Trinh T Tran
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27709, USA
    Autoimmunity 37:301-4. 2004
  65. ncbi request reprint B lymphocytes and systemic lupus erythematosus
    Lisa G Criscione
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, 151G Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Curr Rheumatol Rep 5:264-9. 2003
    ..New approaches to therapy aim to abrogate autoantibody production by targeting specific steps in B cell activation, including blockade of T cell costimulation...
  66. ncbi request reprint Early rheumatoid arthritis
    Kate L Mitchell
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Curr Opin Rheumatol 19:278-83. 2007
    ..The purpose of current research is therefore to identify prognostic markers of early disease and to determine the role of aggressive treatment strategies in inducing remission in such patients...
  67. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of activation of the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line by transfected mammalian DNA
    Weiwen Jiang
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Cell Immunol 229:31-40. 2004
    ..These data indicate that the immune activity of DNA is influenced by context or intracellular location and that, when transfected into cells, mammalian DNA can activate cells through signaling pathways similar to those of bacterial DNA...
  68. ncbi request reprint Role of macrophages in the generation of circulating blood nucleosomes from dead and dying cells
    Ning Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Blood 102:2243-50. 2003
    ..Together, these findings suggest that the generation of blood nucleosomes depends on macrophages, with apoptosis a concomitant of a high burden of dead and dying cells...
  69. ncbi request reprint CD19 regulates B lymphocyte signaling thresholds critical for the development of B-1 lineage cells and autoimmunity
    S Sato
    Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 157:4371-8. 1996
    ....
  70. ncbi request reprint Antinuclear antibodies in rheumatic disease: a proposal for a function-based classification
    D S Pisetsky
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Scand J Immunol 76:223-8. 2012
    ..This classification provides a framework to elucidate the serological features of rheumatic disease and the often uncertain relationship between ANA expression and disease manifestations...
  71. doi request reprint The effects of heparins on the liver: application of mechanistic serum biomarkers in a randomized study in healthy volunteers
    A H Harrill
    Hamner University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 92:214-20. 2012
    ..Biomarker profiles did not differ significantly across heparin treatments. We conclude that heparins as a class cause self-limited and mild hepatocyte necrosis with secondary activation of an innate immune response...
  72. ncbi request reprint Immune response to DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus
    D S Pisetsky
    Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Durham, VA, USA
    Isr Med Assoc J 3:850-3. 2001
    ..To the extent that self-DNA drives responses in SLE, anti-DNA production in this disease may reflect a failure of this suppression. The recognition of DNA's immune activities thus suggests novel possibilities for disease pathogenesis...
  73. pmc Genetic analysis of MRL-lpr mice: relationship of the Fas apoptosis gene to disease manifestations and renal disease-modifying loci
    M L Watson
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710
    J Exp Med 176:1645-56. 1992
    ..Moreover, this study provides a model for dissecting the complex genetic interactions that result in manifestations of autoimmune disease...
  74. ncbi request reprint Regulation of matrix turnover in meniscal explants: role of mechanical stress, interleukin-1, and nitric oxide
    Sang Jin Shin
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Appl Physiol 95:308-13. 2003
    ..These finding suggest that IL-1 may modulate the effects of mechanical stress on extracellular matrix turnover through a pathway that is dependent on NO...
  75. ncbi request reprint The extracellular release of HMGB1 during apoptotic cell death
    Charles W Bell
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, and Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Affairs Hospital, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 291:C1318-25. 2006
    ..Together, these studies indicate that HMGB1 release can occur during the course of apoptosis as well as necrosis and suggest that the release process may vary with cell type...
  76. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of murine macrophage nitric oxide production by synthetic oligonucleotides
    Fu Gang Zhu
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Hospital and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 71:686-94. 2002
    ..Together, these observations indicate that Ps ODN can inhibit macrophage production of inflammatory mediators, suggesting a role of these compounds as immunomodulatory agents...
  77. pmc The induction of HMGB1 release from RAW 264.7 cells by transfected DNA
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Mol Immunol 45:2038-44. 2008
    ....
  78. ncbi request reprint The effect of inflammation on the generation of plasma DNA from dead and dying cells in the peritoneum
    Ning Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 151G, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 77:296-302. 2005
    ....
  79. ncbi request reprint The binding of sera of patients with SLE to bacterial and mammalian DNA
    Kimberly J Hamilton
    Department of Medicine, Medical Research Service, Durham VA Hospital, 151G, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Clin Immunol 118:209-18. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that anti-DNA antibodies vary in specificity and are consistent with a role of both foreign and self-DNA in anti-DNA induction...
  80. ncbi request reprint The release of DNA into the plasma of mice following hepatic cell death by apoptosis and necrosis
    Trinh T Tran
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Biomarkers 13:184-200. 2008
    ..These results indicate that increased blood DNA is common in hepatotoxic injury and is a feature of both apoptotic and necrotic death...
  81. ncbi request reprint The effects of CpG DNA on HMGB1 release by murine macrophage cell lines
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 78:930-6. 2005
    ....
  82. ncbi request reprint The role of IFN-alpha and nitric oxide in the release of HMGB1 by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or lipopolysaccharide
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 177:3337-43. 2006
    ..7 cells. Together, these experiments indicate that, although both LPS and poly(I:C) induce HMGB1 release from RAW 264.7 cells and murine macrophages, the response is differentially dependent on NO and IFN-alpha...
  83. ncbi request reprint The Expression of HMGB1 on Microparticles from Jurkat and HL-60 Cells Undergoing Apoptosis in vitro
    D M Spencer
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Scand J Immunol 80:101-10. 2014
    ..These results indicate that HMGB1, like other nuclear molecules, can translocate into MPs during apoptosis and demonstrate another biochemical form of this molecule that may be immunologically active. ..
  84. ncbi request reprint The effects of intravenous doxycycline therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
    E W St Clair
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 44:1043-7. 2001
    ..CONCLUSION: Although IV doxycycline therapy was generally well-tolerated by patients in this trial, it did not show any evidence of reducing disease activity or collagen crosslink production...
  85. ncbi request reprint Deficiency of 5-lipoxygenase abolishes sex-related survival differences in MRL-lpr/lpr mice
    J L Goulet
    Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Immunol 163:359-66. 1999
    ..These findings suggest that the presence of a functional 5lo gene confers a survival advantage on male MRL-lpr/lpr mice and that, when 5LO function is inhibited, either genetically or pharmacologically, this advantage is abolished...
  86. ncbi request reprint Genetic control of inflammatory arthritis and glomerulonephritis in congenic lpr mice and their F1 hybrids
    G S Gilkeson
    Medical Research Service, Durham VA Medical Center, North Carolina
    J Autoimmun 4:595-606. 1991
    ..These results indicate that renal disease and arthritis develop independently in lpr mice, possibly on a genetic basis, and that the presence and titer of autoantibodies do not correlate with tissue injury...
  87. ncbi request reprint The relationship between apoptosis and high-mobility group protein 1 release from murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, and Medical Research Services, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 178:6495-503. 2007
    ..Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 release from macrophages is correlated with the occurrence of apoptosis and suggest that these processes reflect common mechanisms and can occur concomitantly...
  88. pmc Glomerular type 1 angiotensin receptors augment kidney injury and inflammation in murine autoimmune nephritis
    Steven D Crowley
    Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Duke University Medical Center, and Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Clin Invest 119:943-53. 2009
    ..Since AT1A-deficient lpr mice had low blood pressure, these findings suggest that activation of type 1 angiotensin receptors in the glomerulus is sufficient to accelerate renal injury and inflammation in the absence of hypertension...
  89. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of murine dendritic cell activation by synthetic phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides
    Fu Gang Zhu
    Medical Research Service, Durham Veterans Administration Hospital and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    J Leukoc Biol 72:1154-63. 2002
    ..Together, these observations extend the range of action of inhibitory ODN to DC and suggest a role of these compounds as immunomodulatory agents...
  90. ncbi request reprint Informed consent in a clinical trial of a novel treatment for rheumatoid arthritis
    Lisa G Criscione
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 49:361-7. 2003
    ..To evaluate the informed consent process for a clinical trial of intravenous doxycycline for rheumatoid arthritis...
  91. ncbi request reprint The effects of cyclic mechanical strain and tumor necrosis factor alpha on the response of cells of the meniscus
    Beverley Fermor
    Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 12:956-62. 2004
    ....
  92. ncbi request reprint Induction of immune activation by a novel immunomodulatory oligonucleotide without thymocyte apoptosis
    Weiwen Jiang
    Division of Rheumatology and Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 318:60-6. 2004
    ..The levels of corticosterone induced by HYB2048 were also significantly lower than those induced by LPS. This pattern of activation could distinguish CpG DNA from LPS in its effects on the immune system...
  93. ncbi request reprint Enhancing immunogenicity by CpG DNA
    Weiwen Jiang
    Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, PO Box 151G, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    Curr Opin Mol Ther 5:180-5. 2003
    ..Furthermore, CpG DNA can provide protection against pathogens in animal models and has therapeutic applications in clinical settings such as in cancer and allergy...
  94. pmc Induction of plasma (TRAIL), TNFR-2, Fas ligand, and plasma microparticles after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission: implications for HIV-1 vaccine design
    Nancy Gasper-Smith
    Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Virol 82:7700-10. 2008
    ....
  95. doi request reprint Rheumatology in the current era: the challenge of success
    David S Pisetsky
    Division of Rheumatology and Immunology at the Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 4:165. 2008