Elizabeth J Marsh

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Memorial consequences of testing school-aged children
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 20:899-906. 2012
  2. doi request reprint Using verification feedback to correct errors made on a multiple-choice test
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 20:645-53. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Part-set cuing effects in younger and older adults
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA
    Psychol Aging 19:134-44. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Test-induced priming of false memories
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 14:479-83. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint The memorial consequences of multiple-choice testing
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 14:194-9. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Memorial consequences of answering SAT II questions
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, 9 Flowers Drive, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Psychol Appl 15:1-11. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Learning errors from fiction: difficulties in reducing reliance on fictional stories
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, 9 Flowers Drive, Box 90086, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Mem Cognit 34:1140-9. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint When does generation enhance memory for location?
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 32:1216-20. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Memory and the Moses illusion: failures to detect contradictions with stored knowledge yield negative memorial consequences
    Hayden C Bottoms
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, 9 Flowers Drive, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 18:670-8. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Learning facts from fiction: effects of healthy aging and early-stage dementia of the Alzheimer type
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Neuropsychology 19:115-29. 2005

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. pmc Memorial consequences of testing school-aged children
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 20:899-906. 2012
    ..This negative testing effect was eliminated when children received immediate feedback (consisting of the correct answer) after each multiple-choice selection. Implications for educational practice are discussed...
  2. doi request reprint Using verification feedback to correct errors made on a multiple-choice test
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 20:645-53. 2012
    ..Overall, verification feedback conveyed information to the learner, which has both practical and theoretical implications...
  3. ncbi request reprint Part-set cuing effects in younger and older adults
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA
    Psychol Aging 19:134-44. 2004
    ..Across experiments, older adults showed robust part-set cuing effects, and sometimes, they were disproportionately impaired by cues...
  4. ncbi request reprint Test-induced priming of false memories
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 14:479-83. 2007
    ..The results are consistent with an activation-monitoring explanation of false memories and support that retrieving veridical memories can be a source of memory error...
  5. ncbi request reprint The memorial consequences of multiple-choice testing
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 14:194-9. 2007
    ..Such persistence appears due to faulty reasoning rather than to an increase in the familiarity of lures. Even though students may learn false facts from multiple-choice tests, the positive effects of testing outweigh this cost...
  6. doi request reprint Memorial consequences of answering SAT II questions
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, 9 Flowers Drive, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Psychol Appl 15:1-11. 2009
    ..Students who scored well on the initial test benefited from taking the test, but lower achieving students showed either less benefit (undergraduates) or costs from the testing (high school students)...
  7. ncbi request reprint Learning errors from fiction: difficulties in reducing reliance on fictional stories
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, 9 Flowers Drive, Box 90086, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Mem Cognit 34:1140-9. 2006
    ..Readers do not appear to spontaneously monitor fiction for its veracity, but can do so if reminded on a trial-by-trial basis...
  8. ncbi request reprint When does generation enhance memory for location?
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 32:1216-20. 2006
    ..Generation can enhance location memory in addition to item memory but only if the experimental parameters do not interfere with the processing benefits of generation...
  9. doi request reprint Memory and the Moses illusion: failures to detect contradictions with stored knowledge yield negative memorial consequences
    Hayden C Bottoms
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, 9 Flowers Drive, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 18:670-8. 2010
    ..Overall, answering distorted questions can yield errors in the knowledge base; most importantly, prior knowledge does not protect against these negative memorial consequences...
  10. ncbi request reprint Learning facts from fiction: effects of healthy aging and early-stage dementia of the Alzheimer type
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Neuropsychology 19:115-29. 2005
    ..Benefits of story reading depended on activation of the semantic network, whereas costs of story reading were more dependent on episodic memory processes...
  11. ncbi request reprint Story stimuli for creating false beliefs about the world
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Behav Res Methods Instrum Comput 36:650-5. 2004
    ..The full set of stories and reading comprehension questions may be downloaded from www.psychonomic.org/archive/...
  12. ncbi request reprint Does test-induced priming play a role in the creation of false memories?
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Memory 12:44-55. 2004
    ..Surprisingly, test-induced priming of the critical item does not seem to play a large role in this memory illusion...
  13. pmc Ironic effects of drawing attention to story errors
    Andrea N Eslick
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 19:184-91. 2011
    ..Failure to monitor for errors, not failure to identify the information requiring evaluation, leads to suggestibility...
  14. pmc Memorial consequences of multiple-choice testing on immediate and delayed tests
    Lisa K Fazio
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Mem Cognit 38:407-18. 2010
    ..These results are consistent with the argument that recollection underlies both the positive and negative testing effects...
  15. ncbi request reprint Slowing presentation speed increases illusions of knowledge
    Lisa K Fazio
    Department of Psychology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 15:180-5. 2008
    ..Manipulations that reduce suggestibility for episodic false memories do not always reduce suggestibility for illusions of knowledge...
  16. pmc Receiving right/wrong feedback: consequences for learning
    Lisa K Fazio
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 18:335-50. 2010
    ..Overall, right/wrong feedback conveys some information to the learner, but is not nearly as useful as being told the correct answer or having the chance to review the to-be-learned materials...
  17. doi request reprint Creating illusions of knowledge: learning errors that contradict prior knowledge
    Lisa K Fazio
    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 142:1-5. 2013
    ..Errors can enter the knowledge base even when learners have the knowledge necessary to catch the errors...
  18. ncbi request reprint Older, not younger, children learn more false facts from stories
    Lisa K Fazio
    Duke University, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Cognition 106:1081-9. 2008
    ..Older children, however, were better able to form memories of the misinformation and thus showed greater suggestibility on the general knowledge test...
  19. doi request reprint Aging and the memorial consequences of catching contradictions with prior knowledge
    Sharda Umanath
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Psychol Aging 27:1033-8. 2012
    ..However, older adults were better able to recover and answer correctly after failing to notice errors during story-reading. Implications for false memories and semantic illusions are discussed...
  20. pmc Surprising feedback improves later memory
    Lisa K Fazio
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:88-92. 2009
    ..Overall, participants better remembered both the surface features and the content of surprising feedback...
  21. ncbi request reprint Creating illusions of past encounter through brief exposure
    Alan S Brown
    Department of Psychology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275, USA
    Psychol Sci 20:534-8. 2009
    ..A brief glance at an identical symbol increased attributions to preexperimental experience, relative to a glance at a different symbol or no symbol, providing a possible mechanism for common illusions of false recognition...
  22. ncbi request reprint Evoking false beliefs about autobiographical experience
    Alan S Brown
    Department of Psychology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 15:186-90. 2008
    ..This laboratory procedure for inducing autobiographical false beliefs may have implications for better understanding various illusions of recognition...
  23. ncbi request reprint The positive and negative consequences of multiple-choice testing
    Henry L Roediger
    Department of Psychology, Washington University in St Louis, MO 63130 4899, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 31:1155-9. 2005
    ..Multiple-choice testing may inadvertently lead to the creation of false knowledge...
  24. ncbi request reprint The role of rehearsal and generation in false memory creation
    Elizabeth J Marsh
    Washington University in St Louis, MO, USA
    Memory 12:748-61. 2004
    ..Generation of the lure during study contributes to later false recognition, although it does not explain the entire effect...
  25. pmc Neural correlates of retrieval-based memory enhancement: an fMRI study of the testing effect
    Erik A Wing
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90086, 417 Chapel Drive, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 United States Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Box 90999, B203 Levine Science Research Center, Durham, NC 27708 United States Electronic address
    Neuropsychologia 51:2360-70. 2013
    ..g. relational binding, selection and elaboration of semantically-related information) in addition to those more often associated with retrieval (e.g. memory search). ..
  26. pmc Inferring facts from fiction: reading correct and incorrect information affects memory for related information
    Andrew C Butler
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Memory 20:487-98. 2012
    ..Readers learn more than what is directly stated in stories; they use references to the real world to make both correct and incorrect inferences that are integrated into their knowledge bases...
  27. ncbi request reprint Ageing and the Moses illusion: older adults fall for Moses but if asked directly, stick with Noah
    Sharda Umanath
    a Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Memory 22:481-92. 2014
    ..Most importantly, older adults were more likely to recover from exposure to distorted questions and respond correctly. Explanations of these findings, drawing on theories of cognitive ageing, are discussed. ..
  28. doi request reprint The hypercorrection effect persists over a week, but high-confidence errors return
    Andrew C Butler
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0086, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 18:1238-44. 2011
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint The cognitive, emotional, and social impacts of the September 11 attacks: group differences in memory for the reception context and the determinants of flashbulb memory
    Olivier Luminet
    University of Louvain at Louvain la Neuve, Department of Psychology, Belgium
    J Gen Psychol 131:197-224. 2004
    ..The authors discuss the implications of those findings for the study of group differences in memory and for the formation of flashbulb memories...