Matthew J Kennedy

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Organelles and trafficking machinery for postsynaptic plasticity
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 29:325-62. 2006
  2. pmc Syntaxin-4 defines a domain for activity-dependent exocytosis in dendritic spines
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Cell 141:524-35. 2010
  3. pmc Mechanisms and function of dendritic exocytosis
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Neuron 69:856-75. 2011
  4. pmc Rapid blue-light-mediated induction of protein interactions in living cells
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina, USA
    Nat Methods 7:973-5. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Visual pigment phosphorylation but not transducin translocation can contribute to light adaptation in zebrafish cones
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Biochemistry, Box 357350, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Neuron 41:915-28. 2004
  6. pmc Light-dependent redistribution of arrestin in vertebrate rods is an energy-independent process governed by protein-protein interactions
    K Saidas Nair
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology and Neuroscience Program, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 33136, USA
    Neuron 46:555-67. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Recoverin undergoes light-dependent intracellular translocation in rod photoreceptors
    Katherine J Strissel
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:29250-5. 2005
  8. pmc Mechanisms underlying the rapid induction and sustained expression of synaptic homeostasis
    C Andrew Frank
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Neuroscience Program, University of California, San Francisco, 1550 4th Street, Rock Hall 4th Floor North, San Francisco, California 94158, USA
    Neuron 52:663-77. 2006

Collaborators

  • Ian G Davison
  • Michael Ehlers
  • C Andrew Frank
  • Katherine J Strissel
  • James B Hurley
  • K Saidas Nair
  • Graeme W Davis
  • Kurt W Marek
  • Carleton P Goold
  • Valery I Shestopalov
  • Ana Mendez
  • Vladlen Z Slepak
  • Sergey A Vishnivetskiy
  • Vsevolod V Gurevich
  • Jeannie Chen
  • Lynn H Trieu
  • Polina V Lishko
  • Vadim Y Arshavsky
  • Eugenia V Gurevich
  • Susan M Hanson

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. pmc Organelles and trafficking machinery for postsynaptic plasticity
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 29:325-62. 2006
    ....
  2. pmc Syntaxin-4 defines a domain for activity-dependent exocytosis in dendritic spines
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Cell 141:524-35. 2010
    ..Thus, Stx4 defines an exocytic zone that directs membrane fusion for postsynaptic plasticity, revealing a novel specialization for local membrane traffic in dendritic spines...
  3. pmc Mechanisms and function of dendritic exocytosis
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Neuron 69:856-75. 2011
    ..Here we review the molecules and mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis and discuss how exocytosis from dendrites influences neuronal function and circuit plasticity...
  4. pmc Rapid blue-light-mediated induction of protein interactions in living cells
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina, USA
    Nat Methods 7:973-5. 2010
    ..We demonstrate the utility of this system by inducing protein translocation, transcription and Cre recombinase-mediated DNA recombination using light...
  5. ncbi request reprint Visual pigment phosphorylation but not transducin translocation can contribute to light adaptation in zebrafish cones
    Matthew J Kennedy
    Department of Biochemistry, Box 357350, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Neuron 41:915-28. 2004
    ..Immunocytochemical analyses revealed that neither light nor cytoplasmic Ca2+ influences the localization of transducin in zebrafish cones...
  6. pmc Light-dependent redistribution of arrestin in vertebrate rods is an energy-independent process governed by protein-protein interactions
    K Saidas Nair
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology and Neuroscience Program, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 33136, USA
    Neuron 46:555-67. 2005
    ..These results indicate that the distribution of arrestin in rods is controlled by its dynamic interactions with rhodopsin in the OS and microtubules in the IS and that its movement occurs by simple diffusion...
  7. ncbi request reprint Recoverin undergoes light-dependent intracellular translocation in rod photoreceptors
    Katherine J Strissel
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:29250-5. 2005
    ..To the contrary, no translocation of rhodopsin kinase itself or either GCAP was identified...
  8. pmc Mechanisms underlying the rapid induction and sustained expression of synaptic homeostasis
    C Andrew Frank
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Neuroscience Program, University of California, San Francisco, 1550 4th Street, Rock Hall 4th Floor North, San Francisco, California 94158, USA
    Neuron 52:663-77. 2006
    ..1 calcium channel encoded by cacophony. These data confirm the presynaptic expression of synaptic homeostasis and implicate presynaptic Ca(V)2.1 in a homeostatic retrograde signaling system...