R B Jackson

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Fine-root respiration in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization
    John E Drake
    Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
    Plant Cell Environ 31:1663-72. 2008
  2. pmc Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction
    Robert B Jackson
    Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:11250-5. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint Increased belowground biomass and soil CO2 fluxes after a decade of carbon dioxide enrichment in a warm-temperate forest
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecology 90:3352-66. 2009
  4. pmc Ecosystem rooting depth determined with caves and DNA
    R B Jackson
    Department of Botany and Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:11387-92. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Trading water for carbon with biological carbon sequestration
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 1000, USA
    Science 310:1944-7. 2005
  6. pmc From icy roads to salty streams
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 1000, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14487-8. 2005
  7. pmc Curbing the U.S. carbon deficit
    Robert B Jackson
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, and Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:15827-9. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Root water uptake and transport: using physiological processes in global predictions
    R B Jackson
    Dept of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Plant Sci 5:482-8. 2000
  9. ncbi request reprint Comment on "A reservoir of nitrate beneath desert soils"
    R B Jackson
    Department of Biology, and Nicholas School of theEnvironment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0340, USA
    Science 304:51; author reply 51. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Ecosystem carbon loss with woody plant invasion of grasslands
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0340, USA
    Nature 418:623-6. 2002

Detail Information

Publications34

  1. doi request reprint Fine-root respiration in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization
    John E Drake
    Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
    Plant Cell Environ 31:1663-72. 2008
    ..These results suggest that R(r) is coupled to daily canopy photosynthesis and increases with carbon allocation below ground...
  2. pmc Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction
    Robert B Jackson
    Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:11250-5. 2013
    ..Overall, our data suggest that some homeowners living <1 km from gas wells have drinking water contaminated with stray gases. ..
  3. ncbi request reprint Increased belowground biomass and soil CO2 fluxes after a decade of carbon dioxide enrichment in a warm-temperate forest
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecology 90:3352-66. 2009
    ..Similar increases were observed for soil-solution conductivity and alkalinity at 200 cm in elevated CO2. Overall, the effect of elevated CO2 belowground shows no sign of diminishing after more than a decade of CO2 enrichment...
  4. pmc Ecosystem rooting depth determined with caves and DNA
    R B Jackson
    Department of Botany and Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:11387-92. 1999
    ..fusiformis confirmed water uptake from 18 m underground. The availability of resources at depth, coupled with small surface pools of water and nutrients, may explain the occurrence of deep roots in this and other systems...
  5. ncbi request reprint Trading water for carbon with biological carbon sequestration
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 1000, USA
    Science 310:1944-7. 2005
    ..Plantations can help control groundwater recharge and upwelling but reduce stream flow and salinize and acidify some soils...
  6. pmc From icy roads to salty streams
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 1000, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14487-8. 2005
  7. pmc Curbing the U.S. carbon deficit
    Robert B Jackson
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, and Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:15827-9. 2004
    ..Issues of permanence, leakage, and economic potentials are discussed briefly, as is the recognition that such scenarios are only a first step in addressing total U.S. emissions...
  8. ncbi request reprint Root water uptake and transport: using physiological processes in global predictions
    R B Jackson
    Dept of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Trends Plant Sci 5:482-8. 2000
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Comment on "A reservoir of nitrate beneath desert soils"
    R B Jackson
    Department of Biology, and Nicholas School of theEnvironment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0340, USA
    Science 304:51; author reply 51. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Ecosystem carbon loss with woody plant invasion of grasslands
    Robert B Jackson
    Department of Biology and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0340, USA
    Nature 418:623-6. 2002
    ..Assessments relying on carbon stored from woody plant invasions to balance emissions may therefore be incorrect...
  11. ncbi request reprint Nutrient uptake as a contributing explanation for deep rooting in arid and semi-arid ecosystems
    R L McCulley
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0340, USA
    Oecologia 141:620-8. 2004
    ..We propose that hydraulic redistribution of shallow surface water to deep soil layers by roots may be the mechanism through which deep soil nutrients are mobilized and taken up by plants...
  12. ncbi request reprint Nonlinear grassland responses to past and future atmospheric CO(2)
    Richard A Gill
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 0340, USA
    Nature 417:279-82. 2002
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Hydraulic lift and tolerance to salinity of semiarid species: consequences for species interactions
    Cristina Armas
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Oecologia 162:11-21. 2010
    ..Salt also seems to mediate the interaction between the two species, negating the potential positive effects of an additional water source via hydraulic lift...
  14. doi request reprint Re-assessment of plant carbon dynamics at the Duke free-air CO(2) enrichment site: interactions of atmospheric [CO(2)] with nitrogen and water availability over stand development
    Heather R McCarthy
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    New Phytol 185:514-28. 2010
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Progressive nitrogen limitation of ecosystem processes under elevated CO2 in a warm-temperate forest
    Adrien C Finzi
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Massachusetts 02215, USA
    Ecology 87:15-25. 2006
    ..widening C-to-N ratios and ecosystem-N accrual as processes that drive and delay PNL, respectively. Only direct observations through time will definitively answer this question...
  16. ncbi request reprint A global meta-analysis of soil exchangeable cations, pH, carbon, and nitrogen with afforestation
    Sean T Berthrong
    University Program in Ecology, Duke University, Campus Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:2228-41. 2009
    ..These sustainable practices would in turn slow soil compaction, erosion, and organic matter loss, maintaining soil fertility to the greatest extent possible...
  17. ncbi request reprint Geographical and interannual variability in biomass partitioning in grassland ecosystems: a synthesis of field data
    Dafeng Hui
    Department of Biology and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    New Phytol 169:85-93. 2006
    ..Based on these results, both geographical variability in f(BNPP) and the divergent responses of f(BNPP) with climatic variables at geographical and temporal scales should be considered in global C modeling...
  18. doi request reprint Enhanced isoprene-related tolerance of heat- and light-stressed photosynthesis at low, but not high, CO2 concentrations
    Danielle A Way
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Oecologia 166:273-82. 2011
    ..We propose that isoprene biosynthesis may have evolved at low CO(2) concentrations, where its physiological effect is greatest, and that rising CO(2) will reduce the functional benefit of isoprene in the near future...
  19. pmc Increases in nitrogen uptake rather than nitrogen-use efficiency support higher rates of temperate forest productivity under elevated CO2
    Adrien C Finzi
    Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:14014-9. 2007
    ..Biogeochemical models must be reformulated to allow C transfers below ground that result in additional N uptake under elevated CO(2)...
  20. ncbi request reprint Physical and economic potential of geological CO2 storage in saline aquifers
    Jordan K Eccles
    Nicholas School of the Environment, Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences and Center on Global Change, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 43:1962-9. 2009
    ..Like traditional projects in the extractive industries, geosequestration capacity should be exploited starting with the low-cost storage options first then moving gradually up the supply curve...
  21. pmc Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands
    Sean T Berthrong
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 75:6240-8. 2009
    ..Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils...
  22. ncbi request reprint Set-asides can be better climate investment than corn ethanol
    Gervasio Piñeiro
    Department of Biology and Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0338, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:277-82. 2009
    ..Our results suggest that conversion of CRP lands or other set-aside programs to corn ethanol production should not be encouraged through greenhouse gas policies...
  23. doi request reprint The global stoichiometry of litter nitrogen mineralization
    Stefano Manzoni
    Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 321:684-6. 2008
    ..Our results suggest that decomposers lower their carbon-use efficiency to exploit residues with low initial nitrogen concentration, a strategy used broadly by bacteria and consumers across trophic levels...
  24. doi request reprint Amino acid abundance and proteolytic potential in North American soils
    Kirsten S Hofmockel
    Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Oecologia 163:1069-78. 2010
    ....
  25. pmc Assessment of soil microbial community structure by use of taxon-specific quantitative PCR assays
    Noah Fierer
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:4117-20. 2005
    ..Primers were thoroughly tested for specificity, and the method was applied to three distinct soils. The technique provides a rapid and robust index of microbial community structure...
  26. ncbi request reprint Coupling diurnal cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations to the CAS-IP3 pathway in Arabidopsis
    Ru Hang Tang
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Science 315:1423-6. 2007
    ..The phase and period of oscillations are likely determined by stomatal conductance. Thus, the internal concentration of Ca2+ in plant cells is constantly being actively revised...
  27. pmc The diversity and biogeography of soil bacterial communities
    Noah Fierer
    Department of Biology and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:626-31. 2006
    ..Our results suggest that microbial biogeography is controlled primarily by edaphic variables and differs fundamentally from the biogeography of "macro" organisms...
  28. ncbi request reprint Responses of tropical native and invader C4 grasses to water stress, clipping and increased atmospheric CO2 concentration
    Zdravko Baruch
    Department Estudios Ambientales, University Simòn Bolívar Aptdo, 89000 Caracas, Venezuela
    Oecologia 145:522-32. 2005
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Potential nitrogen constraints on soil carbon sequestration under low and elevated atmospheric CO2
    Richard A Gill
    Program in Environmental Science and Regional Planning, Washington State University, Pullman 99164, USA
    Ecology 87:41-52. 2006
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Functional coordination between leaf gas exchange and vulnerability to xylem cavitation in temperate forest trees
    Hafiz Maherali
    Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada
    Plant Cell Environ 29:571-83. 2006
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Environmental controls on the landscape-scale biogeography of stream bacterial communities
    Noah Fierer
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA
    Ecology 88:2162-73. 2007
    ..Together these results suggest that microorganisms, like "macro"-organisms, do exhibit biogeographical patterns at the landscape scale and that these patterns may be predictable based on biogeochemical factors...
  32. ncbi request reprint Aquaporin-mediated changes in hydraulic conductivity of deep tree roots accessed via caves
    Andrew J McElrone
    USDA ARS, Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit, Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Plant Cell Environ 30:1411-21. 2007
    ..Adjustments in FRHC and AQPC to changing canopy water demands may help the trees maintain the use of reliable water resources from depth and contribute to the success of these species in this semi-arid environment...
  33. ncbi request reprint Toward an ecological classification of soil bacteria
    Noah Fierer
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA
    Ecology 88:1354-64. 2007
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Genetic variance and covariance for physiological traits in Lobelia: are there constraints on adaptive evolution?
    Christina M Caruso
    Department of Biology and Mathematics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa 50112, USA
    Evolution 59:826-37. 2005
    ..cardinalis are caused primarily by a lack of genetic variation, rather than by genetic correlations between these functionally related traits...