Holly K Dressman

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-beta and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression
    Andreas Lux
    University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
    BMC Cardiovasc Disord 6:13. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Gene expression profiles of multiple breast cancer phenotypes and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
    Holly K Dressman
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 12:819-26. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Genomic signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer: targeting the targeted therapies
    Holly K Dressman
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Curr Oncol Rep 8:252-7. 2006
  4. pmc Intratumor heterogeneity and precision of microarray-based predictors of breast cancer biology and clinical outcome
    William T Barry
    Department of Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Center Box 3712, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Oncol 28:2198-206. 2010
  5. pmc Diagnosis of partial body radiation exposure in mice using peripheral blood gene expression profiles
    Sarah K Meadows
    Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e11535. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Gene expression signatures, clinicopathological features, and individualized therapy in breast cancer
    Chaitanya R Acharya
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    JAMA 299:1574-87. 2008
  7. pmc Characterizing the developmental pathways TTF-1, NKX2-8, and PAX9 in lung cancer
    David S Hsu
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Department of Medicine, and Institute for Statistics and Decision Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:5312-7. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Oncogenic pathway signatures in human cancers as a guide to targeted therapies
    Andrea H Bild
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Nature 439:353-7. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Pharmacogenomic strategies provide a rational approach to the treatment of cisplatin-resistant patients with advanced cancer
    David S Hsu
    Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Oncol 25:4350-7. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint A genomic strategy to refine prognosis in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer
    Anil Potti
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    N Engl J Med 355:570-80. 2006

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. pmc ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-beta and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression
    Andreas Lux
    University Hospital Mannheim, Germany
    BMC Cardiovasc Disord 6:13. 2006
    ..Consequently, a perturbance of ALK1, ALK5 or TbetaRII activity leads to vascular defects. Mutations in ALK1 cause the vascular disorder hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)...
  2. ncbi request reprint Gene expression profiles of multiple breast cancer phenotypes and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
    Holly K Dressman
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 12:819-26. 2006
    ..In addition, we defined molecular signatures that correlate with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy...
  3. ncbi request reprint Genomic signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer: targeting the targeted therapies
    Holly K Dressman
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Curr Oncol Rep 8:252-7. 2006
    ....
  4. pmc Intratumor heterogeneity and precision of microarray-based predictors of breast cancer biology and clinical outcome
    William T Barry
    Department of Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Medical Center Box 3712, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Oncol 28:2198-206. 2010
    ..Here, we investigate the additional impact of intratumor heterogeneity, a largely unstudied component of variance, on the performance of several microarray-based assays in breast cancer...
  5. pmc Diagnosis of partial body radiation exposure in mice using peripheral blood gene expression profiles
    Sarah K Meadows
    Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e11535. 2010
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Gene expression signatures, clinicopathological features, and individualized therapy in breast cancer
    Chaitanya R Acharya
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    JAMA 299:1574-87. 2008
    ..Gene expression profiling may be useful for prognostic and therapeutic strategies in breast carcinoma...
  7. pmc Characterizing the developmental pathways TTF-1, NKX2-8, and PAX9 in lung cancer
    David S Hsu
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Department of Medicine, and Institute for Statistics and Decision Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:5312-7. 2009
    ..This suggests that the cohort of patients with coactivation of TTF-1 and NKX2-8 pathways appears to be resistant to standard cisplatin therapy, suggesting the need for alternative therapies in this cohort of high-risk patients...
  8. ncbi request reprint Oncogenic pathway signatures in human cancers as a guide to targeted therapies
    Andrea H Bild
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Nature 439:353-7. 2006
    ..Linking pathway deregulation with sensitivity to therapeutics that target components of the pathway provides an opportunity to make use of these oncogenic pathway signatures to guide the use of targeted therapeutics...
  9. ncbi request reprint Pharmacogenomic strategies provide a rational approach to the treatment of cisplatin-resistant patients with advanced cancer
    David S Hsu
    Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Clin Oncol 25:4350-7. 2007
    ..We utilized a genomic strategy to develop signatures predictive of chemotherapeutic response to both cisplatin and pemetrexed to provide a rational approach to effective individualized medicine...
  10. ncbi request reprint A genomic strategy to refine prognosis in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer
    Anil Potti
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    N Engl J Med 355:570-80. 2006
    ..Indeed, approximately 25 percent of patients with stage IA disease have a recurrence after surgery, suggesting the need to identify patients in this subgroup for more effective therapy...
  11. pmc Gene expression signatures of radiation response are specific, durable and accurate in mice and humans
    Sarah K Meadows
    Division of Cellular Therapy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1912. 2008
    ..Previous work has demonstrated the potential for peripheral blood (PB) gene expression profiling for the detection of disease or environmental exposures...
  12. pmc Gene expression signatures that predict radiation exposure in mice and humans
    Holly K Dressman
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS Med 4:e106. 2007
    ..The capacity to assess environmental inputs to biological phenotypes is limited by methods that can accurately and quantitatively measure these contributions. One such example can be seen in the context of exposure to ionizing radiation...
  13. pmc An integrated approach to the prediction of chemotherapeutic response in patients with breast cancer
    Kelly H Salter
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1908. 2008
    ..This emphasizes the need to evaluate every patient's probability of responding to each chemotherapeutic agent and limiting the agents used to those most likely to be effective...
  14. ncbi request reprint Patterns of gene expression that characterize long-term survival in advanced stage serous ovarian cancers
    Andrew Berchuck
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences, Center for Applied Genomics and Technology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 11:3686-96. 2005
    ..The objective of this study was to define gene expression patterns associated with favorable survival...
  15. ncbi request reprint Prediction of optimal versus suboptimal cytoreduction of advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer with the use of microarrays
    Andrew Berchuck
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am J Obstet Gynecol 190:910-25. 2004
    ..The purpose of this study was to define gene expression patterns that are associated with the optimal versus suboptimal debulking of advanced-stage serous ovarian cancers...
  16. ncbi request reprint Toxicogenomic studies of the rat brain at an early time point following acute sarin exposure
    Tirupapuliyur V Damodaran
    Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, P O Box 3813, Durham, NC, 27710, USA
    Neurochem Res 31:367-81. 2006
    ..Our model (based on current and previous studies) indicates that both degenerative and regenerative pathways are activated early and contribute to the level of neurodegeneration at a later time, leading to neuro-pathological alterations...
  17. ncbi request reprint Genomic signatures to guide the use of chemotherapeutics
    Anil Potti
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Box 3382, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Nat Med 12:1294-300. 2006
    ..The development of gene expression profiles that can predict response to commonly used cytotoxic agents provides opportunities to better use these drugs, including using them in combination with existing targeted therapies...
  18. pmc A methodology for utilization of predictive genomic signatures in FFPE samples
    Jennifer A Freedman
    Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    BMC Med Genomics 4:58. 2011
    ..To facilitate broad use, including in a clinical setting, the ability to generate data from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is essential...
  19. pmc Novel tumor sampling strategies to enable microarray gene expression signatures in breast cancer: a study to determine feasibility and reproducibility in the context of clinical care
    Christopher L Tebbit
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Breast Cancer Res Treat 118:635-43. 2009
    ..Sampling of breast cancer for microarray data is reproducible and feasible in clinical practice and can yield signatures predictive of multiple breast cancer phenotypes...
  20. ncbi request reprint Gene expression profiling and genetic markers in glioblastoma survival
    Jeremy N Rich
    Department of Medicine, W M Keck Center for Neuro Oncogenomics, Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Cancer Res 65:4051-8. 2005
    ....
  21. doi request reprint Ovarian cancer tumor infiltrating T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells are associated with a metastatic phenotype
    Jason C Barnett
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Gynecol Oncol 116:556-62. 2010
    ..The objective of this study was to examine the clinicopathologic correlates of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cell infiltration in serous ovarian cancers and to define gene signatures associated with high T(reg)s...
  22. pmc Microarray analysis of early stage serous ovarian cancers shows profiles predictive of favorable outcome
    Andrew Berchuck
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 15:2448-55. 2009
    ..In the present study, we report on gene expression of early-stage cancers and validate our prognostic model for advanced-stage cancers...
  23. ncbi request reprint Phase I trial of sequential low-dose 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine plus high-dose intravenous bolus interleukin-2 in patients with melanoma or renal cell carcinoma
    Jared A Gollob
    Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 12:4619-27. 2006
    ..To determine how a hypomethylating agent would modulate the toxicity and antitumor activity of immunotherapy, we initiated a phase I trial of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) plus high-dose interleukin 2 (IL-2)...
  24. pmc Gene-expression patterns predict phenotypes of immune-mediated thrombosis
    Anil Potti
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3841 Red Zone, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Blood 107:1391-6. 2006
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Gene expression patterns that characterize advanced stage serous ovarian cancers
    Johnathan M Lancaster
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Soc Gynecol Investig 11:51-9. 2004
    ..To identify gene expression patterns that characterize advanced stage serous ovarian cancers by using microarray expression analysis...
  26. pmc Distinctions in the specificity of E2F function revealed by gene expression signatures
    Esther P Black
    Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:15948-53. 2005
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint Gene expression changes and signaling events associated with the direct antimelanoma effect of IFN-gamma
    Jared A Gollob
    Division of Medical Oncology and Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Cancer Res 65:8869-77. 2005
    ..These findings provide new insights into the signaling events and gene expression changes associated with growth inhibition and apoptosis in melanoma and may thereby assist in identifying new targets for the treatment of melanoma...
  28. ncbi request reprint Elevated expression of a subset of interferon inducible genes in primary bone marrow cells expressing p185 Bcr-Abl versus p210 Bcr-Abl by DNA microarray analysis
    Anjali S Advani
    Division of Hematology and Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Leuk Res 28:285-94. 2004
    ..Our data suggest that their increased expression may contribute to the biological/clinical phenotype associated with p185...
  29. ncbi request reprint Gene expression profiles of the rat brain both immediately and 3 months following acute sarin exposure
    Tirupapuliyur V Damodaran
    Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Biochem Pharmacol 71:497-520. 2006
    ..Our model also predicts that besides dose and duration of post-treatment period, age and possibly other factors may be playing important roles in the regulation of pathways, leading to the neurotoxicity...
  30. ncbi request reprint Molecular profile and partial functional analysis of novel endothelial cell-derived growth factors that regulate hematopoiesis
    John P Chute
    Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Stem Cells 24:1315-27. 2006
    ..These data demonstrate the potential of primary HUBECs as a reservoir for the discovery of novel secreted proteins that regulate human hematopoiesis...
  31. pmc Assessing incomplete deprotection of microarray oligonucleotides in situ
    Holly K Dressman
    Center for Genome Technology, Institute for Genome Science and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:e131. 2006
    ..Screening of microarrays with these monoclonal antibodies should guide the consideration given to data derived from these and should enhance the accuracy of the results obtained...
  32. pmc Unfolded protein response genes regulated by CED-1 are required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity
    Kylie A Haskins
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Dev Cell 15:87-97. 2008
    ..The results indicate that unfolded protein response genes, regulated in a CED-1-dependent manner, are involved in the C. elegans immune response to live bacteria...
  33. ncbi request reprint An integrated genomic-based approach to individualized treatment of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer
    Holly K Dressman
    Division of Gynecologic Surgical Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
    J Clin Oncol 25:517-25. 2007
    ..We have used gene expression profiles to identify patients likely to be resistant to primary platinum-based chemotherapy and also to identify alternate targeted therapeutic options for patients with de novo platinum-resistant disease...
  34. ncbi request reprint Standardizing global gene expression analysis between laboratories and across platforms
    Theodore Bammler
    Nat Methods 2:351-6. 2005
    ..These findings indicate that microarray results can be comparable across multiple laboratories, especially when a common platform and set of procedures are used...
  35. ncbi request reprint Gene microarray analysis of human brain arteriovenous malformations
    Tomoki Hashimoto
    Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, and Center for Cerebrovascular Research, University of California San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
    Neurosurgery 54:410-23; discussion 423-5. 2004
    ..Human brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs) display abnormal expression of various angiogenesis-related genes and their products. We examined gene expression patterns in BAVMs by the gene microarray technique...